10 Tips For Your First Resume

10 Tips For Those Just Starting To Build A Resume

How to stand out and be professional at the same time.

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A resume is something every single job on the planet will request. You all have one, or you at least know how to outline one and what to put on it.

Your resume should tell your potential employer everything relevant about you in one page or less. If your anything like me, that can be hard. So, I've compiled some tips that maybe will help you out, especially if your just getting started in the workforce:

1. Match your resume to your cover letter

In one of my classes, I learned that sometimes people put all of their focus into making their resume look so bold and flashy, that they forget they should be putting the same amount of effort into their cover letters. This is a huge mistake. If you use Microsoft Word to outline your resume, they probably have the same template for a cover letter. Utilize that, because not everyone does and that could give you an edge in the hiring process. You should also be rewriting your cover letter each time and tailoring it to the specific company and position.

2. Make a list of *all* your skills

One great tip I learned is that different companies might expect different skills, even if you're applying for a similar position. By making a long list of all your personal traits and skills, you can highlight your best aspects for a tailor-made resume. Read their expectations and qualifications very carefully, because they usually hint what they are looking for. For example, if they say they want someone who is proficient in AP Style and Microsoft Excel, you should probably include in your skill portion that you know AP Style and how to use Microsoft Excel (only if you actually are, don't lie on your resume! That's unprofessional).

3. Your experience section should reflect your traits

I know this seems like common sense, but when you are describing your responsibilities this is your chance to showcase those traits. If you say you're fluent in AP Style, then obviously you should write your resume in AP Style and not a different format. If you say you have leadership skills, include a position where you were in charge of a project or in a managerial position.

4. Short skills section

Those generic descriptors (motivated, hard-working, self-sufficient) are unnecessary. Keep it short and sweet, only the most relevant information here. This is where that list comes in handy because you can cherry pick your skills that are the most beneficial. Plus, your work experience and your samples will display even more skills that you have. This is just supposed to be the part that can catch the hiring managers attention, it's the part that shows them almost immediately if you're worth even a second glance.

5. Don't just describe your job, identify your accomplishments

The hiring manager reading through your resume probably doesn't care that you wrote an article for Odyssey once a week. However, they probably do care that you racked up 500,000 views on one article or that you have an average of 3,000 views per article.

Give them the numbers and the physical proof, that's what they want. Anyone can say that they worked a Twitter page and have experience running an account for someone, but only you can say that you increased the follower count by 30 percent in the three months that you were there.

6. Update your resume as you go

If you're applying for an entry-level, try to clean out anything older than five years, within reason. You don't need to include your high school volunteer job that you did to get your National Honor Society hours. However, if you've been working at the same grocery store throughout both high school and college, that's a good inclusion because it shows commitment.

When you get older and join the workforce, 10 to 15 years of experience should be fine. This is because higher level positions clearly expect you to have more than a few years of experience. Plus, when you get older, the length of time that you were at a position shows expertise in the field.

7. Proofread

This should be clear enough. Read through your resume and then read through it again. Let multiple pairs of eyes check it, too. When you're 100 percent sure that it's free of mistakes, read through it again.

8. Margins and white space

Use standard one-inch margins, but remember that you shouldn't be cramming all of your text into single space to the point where it looks like a block of text in jibberish. White space is important, it makes it neat and readable. Include it and if it means your resume ends up going a little bit over one page, that's OK. Once your resume gets to two pages, that's when you need to start chopping.

9. Name your file accordingly

If you name your file "resume.docx," guess what... it's gonna get lost. If you name your file "firstname_lastname_resume.docx" then when it comes time to pull resumes for interviews, people are gonna be able to find it easier.

10. Save it in every format imaginable

There's nothing more terrifying than the thought of having to completely redo your resume. All that hard work you put into it and the perfectly crafted descriptions disappearing is my personal worst nightmare.

Save it as a .PDF, copy it onto a flash drive and email it to yourself.

Note: Take my tips with a grain of salt. I'm not a hiring manager. I don't know everything that goes on behind the scenes. This is what I have been told, and what I've researched. Remember that every position and field will expect different things. When you're more experienced and an expert in your field, it will be different.

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I Don't Care How Hard Your Major Is, There Is No Excuse Not To Have A Job While In College

If the name on your credit card does not match the name on your birth certificate, then you really need to re-evaluate your priorities.

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We seem to live in a generation where everyone wants to go to college.

It is nice to see that people want to invest in their education, but at what expense? It's easy to commit to a school, and it is even easier to get yourself and your parents into thousands of dollars of debt because you're "living your best life."

To me, it's pathetic if you're over the age of eighteen and you don't have some sort of income or responsibilities outside of homework and attendance. The old excuse, "I want to focus on school," is no longer valid. You can get all A's while having a job, and that has nothing to do with intelligence, but rather your will to succeed. "I don't have time for a job/internship," translates to, "I'm really lazy,".

You don't need to overextend yourself and work forty hours a week, but you should at least work summers or weekends. Any job is a good job. Whether you babysit, walk dogs, work retail, serve tables or have an internship. You need to do something.

"My major is too hard," is not an excuse either. If you can go out on the weekends, you can work.

The rigor of your major should not determine whether or not you decide to contribute to your education. If the name on your credit card does not match the name on your birth certificate, then you really need to re-evaluate your priorities.

Working hard in school does not compensate for having any sense of responsibility.

I understand that not everyone has the same level of time management skills, but if you truly can't work during the school year, you need to be working over the summer and during your breaks. The money you make should not exclusively be for spending; you should be putting it towards books, loans, or housing.

Internships are important too, paid or not.

In my opinion, if you chose not to work for income, you should be working for experience. Your resume includes your degree, but your degree does not include your resume. Experience is important, and internships provide experience. A person working an unpaid internship deserves the same credit as a student working full/part-time.

Though they are not bringing in income for their education, they are gaining experience, and opening up potential opportunities for themselves.

If you go to college just to go to class and do nothing else, then you don't deserve to be there. College is so much more than just turning in assignments, it is a place for mental and academic growth. You need to contribute to your education, whether it is through working for income or working for knowledge or experience.

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8 Ways You Can Pursue An International Job After College

Working in a foreign country is something that so many people dream of, but no one really knows where to start.

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You're extraordinary, not ordinary — so why settle for a bland, typical career? Those who have the traveling bug can find work easily all over the globe. But, how do you decide where to go and what to do?

Those with the wanderlust can look to the ideas below to find a gig enabling them to live anywhere on the planet they may like. Whether you dream of summer days spent on an Australian beach or meditating on a mountain peak in Nepal, it's so much easier to start living your dream sooner than you think!

1. Help children learn English.

To those with a bachelor's degree, the world truly is their oyster. Even if you earned your degree in something like underwater basket weaving (I swear it's a thing), you can enjoy a career overseas teaching English.

In order to receive permission to teach English overseas, you'll need to complete a training program to obtain your Teaching English as a Foreign Language certification. Some organizations will sponsor you to obtain said certification in exchange for offering to teach overseas for at least a year. Of course, if you find working abroad suits you, you can stay longer.

2. Put your typing skills to work and transcribe conversations.

Enjoy nothing better than listening to conversations and transcribing them? Consider heading overseas by landing a transcription job allowing work-from-home scheduling. In the age of the internet, the opportunity is so much closer to you than you'd think.

Didn't get enough training to type quickly by pulling those undergrad essay all-nighters? No problem. You can learn how to type quicker online for free.

3. Flex your entrepreneurial muscles and join a global team.

Not the sort who enjoys listening to their boss all day? Why not strike out on your own while traveling the globe? Sure, you may not have much capital state-side but moving to a nation with a less pricey cost-of-living can help you grow your business endeavors quickly.

Furthermore, hiring international team players makes solid business sense. 72% of people like working on global teams, but they like them even more when they feel listened to and treated fairly. Getting an outside perspective can help business owners find innovative solutions to common problems.

4. Become the live-in help, and enjoy a homestay while you're at it.

Have wanderlust and love the little ones? Consider traveling overseas as an au pair. Being an au pair is similar to becoming a nanny but the job description includes caring for basic cleaning tasks, homework help and dinner preparation as well as changing diapers.

Many of those wanting to explore Europe become au pairs in order to fund the journey. Even though said positions pay relatively little, you get free room and board as part of the bargain. Given how European trains travel great distances in little time, you can reserve many weekends for excursions to nearby nations in the region for super cheap.

5. Or, you can take care of pets abroad.

Who said traveling the world meant needing a huge bankroll? Those who adore our four-legged friends can fund their international escapades by pet sitting for those overseas.

Many people treat their fur babies like family and they demand nothing but the utmost quality of care for their puppies and kitties. Getting started can prove somewhat tricky but once you learn the ropes, you can explore foreign cities to your heart's content for little more than the cost of a big bag of kibble.

6. Use your medical skills for even more good.

Did you do your undergraduate work in nursing or another health-related field? Consider joining an international organization such as Doctors Without Borders to quench your thirst for adventure.

Nothing feels more rewarding than putting your skills to good use to help others. Depending on where you envision your career going, having such experience on your resume stands out to future employers and will help you in the long-run.

7. Join the circus (no, really).

When you were a young child, did you dream of growing up only to run away and join the circus? Believe it or not, this can make for an interesting, if unusual, career path!

If you trained as a gymnast or dancer as a child, you'll have an easier job of finding a troupe of performers with whom to travel the globe. Only got fit in your teen years or early 20s? No problem! Consider getting your group fitness instructors' license and teach classes aboard a cruise ship (only steer clear of the all-night buffet to keep fitting into your leggings).

8. Perform acts of kindness for others around the globe through volunteering.

Are you one of those lucky devils born with a trust fund in hand? If money is no object, consider joining the Peace Corps. As a volunteer with the Peace Corps, you'll receive housing and stipends in exchange for help with their projects around the globe. While competition makes finding roles challenging, anything giving you the opportunity to travel for free comes with some strings.

The Peace Corps isn't only for young people leaving school for the first time. Many retirees wishing to give back after a rewarding career also flock to sign up and begin their journeys.

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