Thank You, Lucy

Thank You, Lucy

How 'I Love Lucy' and its star helped to shape Hollywood.
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I Love Lucy was and remains the original masterpiece of television. Lucy, premiering as television was first emerging as what would become the ultimate American entertainment medium, was incredibly smart of its creators Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Jess Oppenheimer, Madelyn Pugh and Bob Carroll Jr. and incredibly lucky for them all, to say the least. This brain trust would go on to be the true innovators of their respective fields, as well as television as a whole.

It all started with the success of Lucille Ball’s comedic radio show, My Favorite Husband. The tongue-and-cheek title itself proves Ball’s involvement in the rise of female entertainers as more than just sexual beings. Of course, the radio show, and later I Love Lucy both do conform to the ideals of the nuclear family and traditional gender roles. However, in the early 1950s, these were both major progress for women in the entertainment industry. From the time of the incredibly smart decision of Lucy and Desi to start their own television production company, they reminded audiences and their peers that Lucy and Desi were in charge of their show and their own careers. It was right there in the title for them to see.

Historical baby steps in progress for women need to be considered within their historical context. We are able to still celebrate the strides made by past women while still being aware and critiquing the presence of the patriarchy within these historical strides. For example, while the groundbreaking book The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan was soaked in exclusivity against anyone who was not a white, upper or middle-class hetero woman. Yet, we can still understand that Friedan’s work had a part within feminism and the fight for equality. Growing up, Lucille Ball was a true hero and female icon to me. It is still rare to this day for a female comedian to see the success that many male comedians are praised for. Still today, Lucille Ball remains a household name, and probably the most famous American female comedian.

Beside Lucy being innovative television entertainment, the Desilu production company also paved the way for a world of meta sitcoms to come. When Lucy and Desi chose to portray an alternate version of themselves, whether they knew it at the time or not, they created their own sub-genre within sitcoms. This idea of portraying an alternate version of your real life had not been introduced until I Love Lucy, and the television and entertainment industry both have Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz to thank for that.

Additionally, I Love Lucy also created new jobs and opportunities within the behind-the-camera world. Jess Oppenheimer was the beating heart of I Love Lucy, credited both as a writer and a producer of the show. Oppenheimer’s role in Lucy is to thank for the creation of the job title Showrunner, which no television series exists without, to this day. Desi Arnaz also paved the way for a world of creative opportunities in the entertainment industry. He was the first star of a show to not only own the rights to his show but to own the entire production company that produced his show. Desi put his hand in every creative aspect, from scripts to lighting, to the camera department, to stunts, to casting and eventually being double credited as a producer on the show.

Cover Image Credit: Wikimedia

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18 Ways The Disney College Program Destroys You

"I can only hope we never lose sight of one thing, that it was all started by a mouse" - Walt Disney
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The Disney College Program, three little words that may or may not forever change your perspective of the world. Working for Disney has been my dream since I was a little kid. That’s all I ever wanted to do with my life-- to become a part of the magic. It wasn’t just because it’s Disney World, the most magical place on Earth. It's because I truly admire everything that this company stands for. Disney is all about bringing families and friends together, creating memories that will last a lifetime and sprinkling a little pixie dust over this magical place that I’ve called home for eleven months. I knew all of this when I received that “Congratulations!” email. Excitement rushed through my veins . The world of possibilities had finally opened its door for me. What I didn’t know, was what those possibilities truly meant, until post DCP depression kicked in. It's a real thing my friends.

1. You are always going to be an extremely friendly and approachable person.

No matter where you are or who you are talking to, you can't help to smile. You always carry a welcoming vibe with you, no matter what situation you are placed in. Working for Disney taught you how to have the patience of a Saint when it comes to dealing with people. You learned that the best way to communicate is listening to everyone with an open mind, even if they’re screaming in your face about Test Track being out of FastPasses.

2. You are constantly finding hidden Mickeys in the real world.

Admit it, your mind creates hidden Mickeys out of almost every random three circle formation. You can’t help it. You have Disney on your mind all the time.

3. You are FULL of Disney Park fun facts.

Did you know that there are 11,324 triangles that make up Spaceship Earth?!

You love sharing your vast pool of knowledge of random Disney Park fun facts. Sometimes even when people don't care about it, you just have to talk about all the things you learned as a CP.

4. You also may speak ride spiel.

“We're not gonna make it, we're not gonna make it"- Dinosaur at Disney's Animal Kingdom.

When you work for Disney, you live and breath Disney. You couldn't even count how many times you've been to the park, even just to hub grass and chill or ride the People Mover four times in a row. Those spiels were a part of your everyday life. You know when you are riding Hunted Mansion with a boatload of cast members when everyone in the stretch room whispers, "I am your host, your ghost host". Going to the park almost every day is a part of CP culture. Accidentally referring to ride spells still sometimes slips into your daily conversation. Did you really do the college program if you don't know at least one ride spiel?

5. You constantly feel the need to get down the small child's level and talk to them about their favorite Disney characters.

"Hi Princess! My, you look dashing today, what Kingdom did you travel from?!"

What you would do to get back to the days when you were paid to sit on the ground to talk to a child dressed up as Cinderella. You see a child at your real world job and you feel the need to ask them about the about their favorite Disney movie. You catch yourself accidentally referring to people as princess in the real world, but it instated of the magic it used to produce, they look at you like you’re a crazy person. *sigh*

6. If your friends hear you say, ”So this one time in Disney…" one more time they may punch you in the face.

OMG-- this reminds me of this one time in Disney when...*insert story of an amazing day you and your Disney fam had here.*

You can’t help it, every single day was filled with an adventure during your CP. You want to share your stories with everyone you encounter. It's like word vomit. The second something reminds you of your CP there is no stopping you. Your friends back home may either get really annoyed or end up learning everything you did when you had free access to Disney World.

7. Boy do you miss the days when Mondays were happy.

"We love you Mondays, we do."

For some who were into the social scene, you blankly gaze out your window on a Monday night wondering what county you would have been playing at Son On The Beach. You watch your remaining CP friends' Snapchat stories and think to yourself, "Anzacs VS. Gayllerie!? Ugh, must have been a good game." You miss the days when your only struggle was to make it out of work on time to get to Happy Mondays. Your friends back home wonder how you are so freakishly good at flip cup. It’s a CP thing.

8. 90% of your best friends are long distance.

Skype dates are essential.

You created bonds with people from all over the world during your CP. You celebrated holidays with these people. You spent every single day with them during your time in Florida. Your program would never be as magical if it wasn't for the amazing people you met here. Some of these people turn into your life long best friends-- even if they currently reside 12 hours ahead of you. There isn't a day that goes by that you don’t think about you CP BFFs. When they say you will meet the most amazing people you will ever interact with working for Disney, they were not kidding. These people are even more than friends to you, they are family. If it means staying up till 2AM to Skype with your old roommate, who now lives on the other side of the world, it doesn't even cross your mind how late it is. Catching up with them is always worth it.

9. You probably have roughly 500 "I'm Celebrating" buttons.

"Happy squad-iversary!"

You found every excuse in the book to rock an "I'm Celebrating" button when you and your squad hit the parks. "I'm celebrating ERs" was a great one to sport when you got off work early. The button days were the special days. You could probably fill an entire cork board with all of the buttons you collected over your CP. Thank goodness for that, you'll have a tangible memory of those magical days for a lifetime.

10. The clock strikes 3:00PM and you know the Festival Of Fantasy Parade is strolling out of Frontier Land.

“Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, the time has come to take your places” -The Festival Of Fantasy Parade.

You continuously catch yourself looking at the clock around 3PM and feeling a little empty inside. To all the days before work when you watched that parade with your roommates, you were the greatest. You can always spot a cast member as “dreams that glow” blur down Main Street. They are usually the ones dancing along and singing as their favorite floats pass by. What you would do to relive those days.

11. You know a lot about the world and the people it's made up of.

I’d be real keen to learn about your culture over some Maccas, eh.

You know to never tell an Australian their accent sounds like a Kiwi's or visa-versa. You can spot the difference from miles away. You’ve learned the lads from down under are some of the funniest people you’ll ever interact with, and there are in fact, no kangaroos in New Zealand— just wallabies. You know that the people from Spain and Brazil are usually down for some fun and it's always a good time to kick back with your friends from France or The Netherlands. It's true that the Italians are loud and outspoken, in the best way possible. The people from Japan are simply the some of the sweetest. You meet so many people from all over the world and learn so much about their culture. You get more of a feel for all of the greatness the world is made up of than any textbook could ever explain.

12. You could draw a map of Magic Kingdom blindfolded.

“Nearest FastPass kiosk?!” “Down the pathway to the left!

Not only is Disney World your home, but you know every square inch of it. You could still probably give someone directions to the nearest quick service restaurant of your location, from wherever you are currently sitting in the world.

13. Applying for jobs? Disney always makes you stand out.

“Wow, you worked for Disney World? Tell me more about that!”

Your resume stands out among the thousands. Potential employers want to hear about your Disney College Program experience and you are over the moon to share. You tell them about the days where you immersed guests into the theme of your location and all of the magic you made. Working for the number one entertainment company is something to be proud of.

14. You are constantly checking airline prices to reunite with your roommates and get back to the place that started it all.

There is nothing better than reuniting with your Disney family. Your most visited web pages are airlines sites. You count the days where you can rule the parks again with your favorite people by your side. You can't help but to run to them in the middle of MCO with tears in your eyes and magic in your heart, ready to create even more memories together. You know you found forever friends in them, it's never goodbye— it's see ya real soon.

15. You have a strong emotional attachment to certain rides of shows.

"The best part is, you'll never run out of wishes"- Wishes Nighttime Spectacular.

There are some shows and rides that take you right back to the days where Walt Disney World was your usual hang out spot. Some of those shows have so much more meaning to you and the magic you made. You tend to get a little teary eyed watching them when you visit. Even when your CP is over, the magic lives on in your soul.

16. Disney is not just a vacation spot to you, it’s your home.

You feel at ease here. You may have even found who you are and who you aspire to be here. It’s a special place to you that holds so much magic. Going back feels familiar. You never feel like an outsider here. Walt Disney World really is your home and it welcomes you right back every time you return.

17. People who know you before your College Program say you've changed.

You're more outspoken, you are confident in yourself and you carry on with pride. Not to mention your work ethic and customer service skills are outstanding. You believe in things and the people around you. You believe in magic and that's all thanks to the Disney College Program.

18. It was the best 4 months - 1 year of your life and you would do anything to relive just one more day of being a CP.

"While no one knows for sure what we'll see or do. I do know it will be quite an adventure, an adventure that we'll take and make together. See you in the future"- Spaceship Earth.

If you were given the opportunity to put on those extreme high-waisted polyester grandpa pants and that florescent shirt that was probably eight sizes too big for you— you’d do it in a heartbeat. Despite the long hours and blazing sun, sometimes your life felt like a dream. Your time spent working for the mouse will forever be your most magical days, as the Disney College Program was the best opportunity of your entire life.

Cover Image Credit: Dana Saccoccio

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A new version for a new generation.

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I would like to propose a cinematic edition of Truman Capote's story "Breakfast at Tiffany's" which I aptly would like to call "Cross My Heart and Kiss My Elbow." The title is a quote from the film, where Holly Golightly, the main character, states: "I don't know that I should even discuss it. But, well, he never told me not to tell anyone. Cross your heart and kiss your elbow."

This idea would combine the work as well as the film adaptation that was directed by Blake Edwards in 1961. I want it to be a digital edition of the work that will include excerpts from the film script and compare the plot, dialogue, and differences between the editions of the book and the film, as well as suggestions for a more "modern edition". I do want the modern suggestions in the pages because I want to highlight the relevance of the story itself through time that the novel was written until now, as well as simplify some of the slang that was used in the '50s and the grandiose way that Holly Golightly speaks.

I also think that there are certain things that could be simplified for the audience, whether they be students reading the book in a school setting or a reader who simply loves Capote or the book just happens to catch their interest. For example, Holly uses some French phrases throughout the novella and the film, so that is something that I would want in with any collation notes or suggestions for modernization.

This edition is important because there are many lessons that can be learned from Holly Golightly and her story. I think that my edition will be able to help make those messages clear, as well as bring together editions and the film in a way that generations will be able to enjoy. Because I want to encapsulate things from the film, and photographs from the biographies on Audrey that I found.

To accomplish this edition, in addition to the excerpts from the script, I plan to include stills from the film, as well as any cast interviews. In the layout of the original publication, there were cartoons inserted in the bottom corners of the page, so I would like to put the film stills in the same areas for the edition. The quotes from the film I want in footnotes, because it will help aid the reader in examining the differences between the movie and the book. I think that this will be able to help further point out editorial choices and liberties that the editors and filmmakers have made over the course of time. Any suggestions for modernization will be along with the quotes from the film, that way everything is together and concise. In particular, scenes that the film has done well, I want to have them hyperlinked in the text, so readers after getting through the reading of scene can see it acted out and contextualized in a different way. There are also lines from the book that were kept for the film that I particularly wanted to note and link as well.

In terms of typography on the title page and table of contents, I feel using the same or a similar font of the Tiffany&Co; logo would be a good choice. It encapsulates the quote from the film where Holly states: "Well when I get it the only thing that does any good is to jump in a cab and go to Tiffany's. Calms me down right away. The quietness and the proud look of it; nothing very bad could happen to you there. If I could find a real-life place that'd make me feel like Tiffany's, then-then I'd buy some furniture and give the cat a name!", as well as the title of both the film and the novella. I want the text to look as authentic and as close to the layout in

Esquire as possible, which will help with the aforementioned film stills and the placement of them.

For the apparatus, I want to, as I have mentioned, provide stills from the film and hyperlink scenes from the film that way readers can see the scenes from the book acted out. For the stills, I want to have screenshots from the movie. One of the most important skills to include is the iconic scene where Holly exits her cab and stares longingly at the closed Tiffany store. In the scenes, hyperlinks to the scenes on YouTube I want to be included at the ends of the relevant paragraphs. For example, the ending scene I want to be linked, that way once the reader finishes the book, they can compare the endings for themselves.

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