Just because I'm skinny doesn't mean you can body shame me

Just Because I'm Skinny Doesn't Mean It's OK To Body Shame Me

It's not okay for me to tell you to slow down on the Ho Hos but it's okay for you to tell me to go eat a burger?

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In today's society, body shaming seems to be common, which is unfortunate since it happens to everyone. Body shaming is known to occur to women or men we may consider "overweight." People may crack jokes or insults to overweight individuals.

As I am not considered "overweight," I am considered a "twig" to most — which has, of course, come with body shaming.

When you have a high and fast metabolism, it's pretty easy to just eat whatever you want and not gain the weight like other individuals might, but can I help that? No, I cannot, so stop telling me to go "eat a burger" because that doesn't make me feel any better about my thigh gap.

Skinny individuals might often hear negative comments from people that may pose to be "larger" or "thicker" but that doesn't make it okay.

If I can't tell you to "shed a few pounds" then you most certainly cannot tell me to "gain a couple pounds."

In my opinion and experience, it seems as though skinny individuals like myself get the backlash from "overweight" individuals. Is that because people that are bigger than me think I won't get offended because I'm small, or weigh less than them? Do people that body shame the skinny think that we're too comfortable in our own skin to get mad or angry? Or is it to make me feel bad about being too skinny to eat my way into a couple extra pounds?

Yes, in this world it is very hard to feel confident in your own skin with all the body shaming and negative feedback, but that shouldn't be a trigger to thinking it's okay to lash out on others.

I know for a fact that if I got on Twitter and found a "thick" person and called her "fat" that I wouldn't see the light in the next day because I'd be called cruel or get negative attention for body shaming. Now, If you were on Twitter and saw a bigger person call a skinny person a "twig" or "too skinny" there would be not near as much hate. That is completely outrageous because it all hurts the same.

The truth is, if you're a decent human being you won't care if there's a 400lb man on Twitter posting shirtless selfies or a 5'8"125-pound girl posting bikini pictures. A decent human being would be able to sit back and acknowledge that both pictures are the same. Because if both individuals in the picture are happy and confident then you should respect that and not body shame. What do you achieve from being a negative Nancy? 20k likes on a tweet? If that's the case, then you're just pathetic.

And don't think that just because I can wear a size 0 pant or an extra small top that I'm not self-conscious about my body. It's because of body shaming pricks like you that make me feel like I can't go out to the beach in my bikini because my ribs show when I raise my arms, or because my ass isn't peachy enough for you to look at.

The word on the street has always been, if you don't have anything nice to say then don't say it all — at least that's how my parents always raised me.

If you are overweight, who cares? If you have a thigh gap, who cares? And if you're considered an average weight, who cares? I know I don't, and I especially don't care enough to make an insult about it.

If you don't like when people tell you to go to the gym and lay off the junk food then do not come at me with a “go eat a burger" comment or a “do you even eat" side comment. because you won't gain anything out of that one — especially because I've heard that too many times. Be confident with yourself and keep your snide comments to yourself. I don't care if you're a size 14, so don't care that I'm a size 0.

And that's the tea, sis.

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ASU Students Push For A Healthier Dining Hall To Counter 'Freshman 15' Fears

The freshman 15 is an avoidable curse, but many students will continue to follow into its trap.

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Arizona State University students are pushing for change within the downtown Phoenix dining hall as they strive to avoid the infamous freshman 15.

The downtown Phoenix campus offers fewer dining options than the Tempe campus and has a less appetizing dining hall. The freshman 15 is a common scare among students living in the dorms, who are often freshman.

The freshman 15 is defined as a student who gains 15 pounds or more in their first year of college. Studies prove the average freshman does not exercise the right amount, is sleep deprived, has a poor diet, increases their stress level, alcohol consumption, and fatty food intake, which is most likely causing their weight gain.

Lauren Hernandez

Daniella Rudoy, a journalism major and fitness instructor at the SDFC, relived her freshman year as she provided tips for incoming freshman.

"There are a lot of workouts you can do in your dorm room as long as you have access to YouTube or a floor. You can go on a run, a walk, or do exercises that do not require equipment," Rudoy said in support of college fitness.

Rudoy said that mental health, fitness, and nutrition all correlate with one another.

"I follow the saying abs are made in the kitchen. So if you are working out day and night, but eating a giant pizza and chicken wings with a pack of beer when you come home you aren't doing yourself much good," Rudoy said.

Lauren Hernandez

The main cause for weight gain is increased alcohol consumption. 80 percent of college students drink and this includes binge-drinking, which is unhealthy for many reasons.

Students who do not drink are most likely gaining weight because of their exposure to an all-you-can-eat dining hall. The downtown Phoenix campus offers a salad bar as their only consistent healthy option for students, therefore students are left eating hamburgers, fries, and pizza.

"I haven't been to the dining hall this semester. Last semester, I went because I had no other options. I am a vegetarian and the dining hall is not accommodating to those with allergies or food restrictions. I find it very difficult to find vegetarian options," Lexi Varrato, a journalism major said.

Lauren Hernandez

Varrato explained that she believes the freshman 15 is "100% real" and that incoming freshmen should research their meal plans and ask their school how their dietary restrictions will be accommodated before purchasing a non-refundable meal plan.

Megan Tretter, a nursing major at Seattle University emphasized that not every dining hall is like ASU's and that the freshman 15 is "definitely not a problem" at her school.

"I always eat healthy at my dining hall. There are a lot of good and healthy options at Seattle University. I usually go to the smoothie line in the morning, have a salad for lunch, and make myself an acai bowl after work with avocado toast in our floor's kitchen," Tretter said in support of her school's strive for healthy options.

College students across the United States have healthier dining options than ASU, but many colleges still face the same problems that students here are facing.

Tara Shultz, a journalism major at ASU believes she has avoided the "very real" freshman 15 by living at home.

"I believe the freshman 15 targets dorm residence and first-year students who do not live at home as they do not have their parents as a guide and are forced to eat at a dining hall that only serves fatty foods," Shultz emphasized.

Lauren Hernandez

The downtown Phoenix campus offers students access to the SDFC, YMCA, and Taylor Place gym, where students can take group fitness classes, run on a track, play basketball, or swim. Alternative options for students are purchasing a membership at Orangetheory or EOS Fitness.

Most students agreed with journalism major Vanessa Gonzalez that they have little time to work out due to their workload, but many students like Varrato, Tretter, and Rudoy explained that they try to work out every day as it is a stress reliever and it enriches their mental health.

Steve Fiorentino, the owner of Powered Up Nutrition encourages college students to learn what they are putting in their bodies.

"I think it starts with nutrition. Students believe they can outwork a bad diet and I believe that is their number one mistake. My advice is to stop eating fast foods and start eating whole and healthy foods along with supplements," Fiorentino stated.

The freshman 15 is an avoidable curse, but many students will continue to follow into its trap. The campus dining hall is not always the reason to blame as students have the option to decrease their meal plans, become active, and make healthy choices!

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The Only Difference Between A Summer Body And Your Winter Body Is Your Attitude

Your love handles need love, too.

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Summer is coming and for most, this is a very exciting time. The weather is warm, school is out, and the beaches are packed. Although summer is great most of the time, it can also be super stressful for people who aren't confident in their bodies. There is a body ideal that is set on media sharing sites such as Instagram, Facebook, and VSCO that makes people feel like they need to fit that image to be considered attractive.

My first problem is, well, these images are unrealistic in the first place. Most of the time, people posting photos of them in their bikinis or swim trunks have edited the photo in some way. Whether they've edited it to appear skinnier, more muscular, or tanner, odds are they've doctored the photo in some way. Even if they haven't, who cares!

I know I've personally struggled when it comes time to buy a bathing suit. Honestly, it's the worst thing ever. Looking in the mirror and seeing what you look like after the holidays and 4 months without the sun can be shocking. It's time to embrace this! I've seen so many people posting "working on my summer body," or "getting ready for bikini season," and it's honestly just sad.

A person shouldn't have to change their everyday lifestyle to want to "look good" in their bathing suit. What's wrong with a little extra weight on the thighs or some cellulite on your butt? As long as you feel confident with your body, you should want to embrace it and show it off!

Feeling confident in today's world is harder than ever for women. The media is pushing body positivity, but it doesn't seem like it applies to everyone. If a celebrity is a little thicker, everyone applauds them and talks about how beautiful they are, "even though they're bigger," and that is exactly where the problem lies. Shifting the standard of beauty because someone is bigger totally discredits whatever compliments they receive. It's a backhanded compliment and it's not fair to include a comment about their weight while trying to compliment them. Someone's beauty should not be defined by how big or small they are and saying people are an exception to the rule probably hurts them more than you think.

I don't know about you but I won't be doing anything to prepare my body for this summer because these people are going to take what I give them! All in all, love yourself first and it'll give others the opportunity to do the same!

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