'RuPaul's Drag Race' Season 11 Has Us Gagging For More

'RuPaul's Drag Race' Season 11 Has Us Gagging For More

The season 11 premiere had the tea, the gags, the memes, and a whole lot of fish.

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If you're a fan of "RuPaul's Drag Race" like I am, then you know the love-hate feeling you get with the show. (RELAX, this post is spoiler-free.)

The VH1 series' 11th season, which premiered on February 28, 2019, started with a bang fresh from the controversial double-crowning of Monet X Change and Trinity the Tuck in the fourth season of its spin-off "All-Stars" two weeks before.

Fifteen queens are on this season, including the fishy Plastique Tiara and the mom-trying-to-use-millennial-slang-level cringey-yet-lovable Silky Nutmeg Ganache. But what's got everyone watching is, of course, the legendary meme legend herself, Vanessa "Miss Vanjie" Mateo, who became a meme following her iconic exit as the first queen to go on season 10.

The inaugural episode featured some of the typical challenges, such as photo shoots and a themed weekly challenge. What was different is that these challenges centered around inspiration from queens from seasons past.

Legends like Raja, Manila Luzon and Sonique made cameos in the photo shoot mini challenge. In the "maxi" primary challenge, each queen had to make an outfit based on props in a box based on the styles of earlier queens such as Kim Chi and Katya.

But of course, what was the greatest moment of this episode was Miley Cyrus and the aforementioned Silky picking her up and probably traumatizing her. And who couldn't be gagged at that "Best of Both Worlds" lip sync?!!!

Overall, I'm really excited what's in store for season 11 of "Drag Race." Though I have some reservations about the personalities of some queens and style choices of some others, I think season 11 will make up for some of the baggage that past seasons have carried.

At this point, I don't have a favorite or a prediction of who might snatch the crown, with of course the exception of Vanjie because of her newfound fame in the past. But if history is any indication of how "Drag Race" turns out, anything can happen.

New episodes of season 11 of "RuPaul's Drag Race" premiere Thursday's at 9/8c on VH1.

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6 Places in New York City Every "Friends" Fan Needs To Visit

Grab a cup of coffee at Central Park.
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As a "Friends" fanatic myself, I often wonder about the places in New York City featured in the various episodes and whether I could actually visit them. Most of them are fictional or no longer exist, but there are a few places you can go to reminisce about your favorite "Friends" moments. So, here are six places in New York City you definitely need to visit as a "Friends" fan.

1. The Apartment Building, Obviously

The building used for the exterior shot of the apartments in "Friends" is real and is located at 90 Bedford Street at the corner of Grove Street in Greenwich Village. It's an obvious must-see.

2. The Pulitzer Fountain

This is the fountain that the friends danced around in for the iconic theme song, and it's located right in Central Park.

3. Bloomingdale's

This is the department where Rachel worked before she moved on to Ralph Lauren, where she met Joshua, and where she started her career in fashion.

4. The Plaza Hotel

This is where Monica and Chandler celebrated their engagement in "The One WIth Monica's Thunder," and is actually really gorgeous.

5. The Central Perk Replica

While Central Perk isn't a real coffee shop, a pop-up replica opened up in 2014 on Lafayette Street and it's definitely a must-visit.

6. Chandler's Office

The fictional Chandler works in the real Solow Building, located on West 57th street.

Cover Image Credit: Fame Focus

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Dear Olivia Jade

An expression of concern on behalf of the student body.

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Dear Olivia Jade,

Almost nineteen years ago I was born in Long Beach, California, to an immigrant mother and a father who would soon be essentially jobless. Both my parents went back to school when I was a child - my father got his law degree online and is now a public defender, and my mother got her degree in biology from Fresno State. It was incredibly difficult for both of them to do this and raise three children, but they did, and I am eternally grateful. From a young age, I was taught that education is important. You make sacrifices for it. It means a lot more to people than game days and partying.

Unfortunately, they never taught me that this country's educational system is incredibly classist (I have Twitter and my AP Composition teacher in high school to thank for that). For this demonstration, I'm going to have to talk about myself more - I'm sure as a vlogger you understand. When I applied to USC, I had a 3.8 GPA, took 9 AP classes, was heavily involved in choir, started a club for mental health awareness, and had written decent essays. I worked hard in high school, and I deserved to get in. But I was pretty privileged compared to most kids. I lived in a two bedroom apartment with my dad, but we were living comfortably. I had a laptop to study with, and if I needed anything for school he was there to support me. Furthermore, my high school's average family income was in the upper 9% compared to other schools, and having rich parents around means bigger donations, smaller class sizes, more extracurricular opportunities and overall a better quality education. The environment I was in encouraged me to succeed in a system where a degree from an elite university is seen as the key to entering the 1%, even though the only people who can truly afford it are in that top 1%. But I was grateful for the opportunities I had been given, and I chose USC because I thought that in the long run, it was worth the financial risk.

Still, sometimes I wished I was like you. You, with your famous parents, YouTube money, millions of followers, and excellent bone structure. You, with your carefree attitude about school, not having to worry about your midterms, not having to worry about getting a job, not having to worry about financial aid. But the fact of the matter is, whether or not you knew about the entire scam, you sit on a throne of privilege and lies. You were admitted to USC because your parents bribed your way in. You and your sister received scholarships from USC when they could have gone to two students who were much more deserving.

I'll admit, when this story broke it hurt me on a personal level. Right now I'm considering taking a year off from school and preparing to transfer, because I literally cannot afford to go here, and it is devastating. I can't tell you how bad it feels, as someone who worked so hard despite struggling with mental illness and was even hospitalized in high school, to get a reality check only halfway through your first semester that going to your dream school is no longer feasible. And I'm not alone. I have too many friends in similar situations, who have either accepted their impending debt, or who may drop out. We are the minority at USC, but the unfortunate majority of college students. We aren't here to have fun, we're here to get a degree. To get a job. To not disappoint our parents who sacrificed so much for us. To survive.

And that's why you should drop out.

At orientation, we were all told the five traits of a Trojan: faithful, skillful, scholarly, courageous, and ambitious. I do not know you well enough to know if you are faithful, courageous, or ambitious (skillful at social media and marketing, maybe), but you are most certainly not scholarly (aside from the whole mom paying $500,000 to get you in thing, your school-hating tweets are further proof). And if you and your sister don't drop out of USC, you won't have any integrity either. Two hard-working, bright, and deserving transfer applicants will be denied the opportunity of getting to study at an amazing school because of you taking their spots. They need this degree. You don't.

If, by a long shot, you're reading this, I hope you don't see this letter as a personal attack, rather, advice. An expression of concern on behalf of the student body. After all, you don't need a college degree to party in LA.

Sincerely,

A broke, frustrated, yet hopeful college student.

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