Red versus Blue: Why Cities Vote Democratic

Red versus Blue: Why Cities Vote Democratic

Why big cities tend to vote blue rather than red.
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Have you ever wondered why, while watching the presidential race, big cities turn blue while rural areas of the nation tend to turn red? The answer is rooted in history.

Big cities in the United States are a forceful engine for the economy, generating nearly 85 percent of the economic output (Richard Florida; 2013). A large portion of the population in the United States lives in these urban areas; nearly 62.7 percent of the population as of 2015, while cities make up roughly only 3.5 percent of land mass. So what makes these areas vote democratic?

Well, the dense population of these cities helps quite a bit. The GOP strategy of attempting to gain the vote of rural states is unfortunately outdated, and doesn't exactly work in today's America. New York City alone is home to nearly 8.406 million people, according to the last census. That's roughly the same number of people that live in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, and the western half of Minnesota combined (Ben Platt). So, if you figure that a Democratic nominee can secure the votes of New York City alone, they're already neck and neck. If cities are a big part of economic growth in the United States, then you're looking at a cluster of people that contribute to that growth.

Education and the socioeconomic class also has a lot to do with the partisan vote in urban areas. If you think about the breakdown of why people vote republican versus democrat, this isn't necessarily difficult to understand. The creative class of workers, people in the arts, sciences, culture and entertainment, historically vote democratic while the working class Americans tend to vote republican.

Now, let's talk about diversity. Speaking historically and geographically, people from all over the world have immigrated to America's coastal cities. States such as New York and Philadelphia, which are home to places like Chinatown and Little Italy that were founded by migrant classes. There really isn't a concrete answer as to why migrant groups tend to stay together in large urban areas, but if you figure there's a family of twelve coming from Italy to New York City in the early 1900s, there's a good chance they'll stick together. Other large urban areas, such as the L.A and some cities in Texas, are geographically located in a way that migrants from Mexico and South America make their way there. So, a large portion of the answer to this question could be contributed to the racial and social diversity, and liberal ideology of cities.

Politics is a complex issue, so there is no single answer to this question. The divide between cities and rural areas is economic and geographical, rooted in socioeconomic divides of class. But, here was a little dig at it.

If you're looking for some more information, this is a really great article from the Atlantic.

Cover Image Credit: Google

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College As Told By Junie B. Jones

A tribute to the beloved author Barbara Parks.
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The Junie B. Jones series was a big part of my childhood. They were the first chapter books I ever read. On car trips, my mother would entertain my sister and me by purchasing a new Junie B. Jones book and reading it to us. My favorite part about the books then, and still, are how funny they are. Junie B. takes things very literally, and her (mis)adventures are hilarious. A lot of children's authors tend to write for children and parents in their books to keep the attention of both parties. Barbara Park, the author of the Junie B. Jones series, did just that. This is why many things Junie B. said in Kindergarten could be applied to her experiences in college, as shown here.

When Junie B. introduces herself hundreds of times during orientation week:

“My name is Junie B. Jones. The B stands for Beatrice. Except I don't like Beatrice. I just like B and that's all." (Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, p. 1)

When she goes to her first college career fair:

"Yeah, only guess what? I never even heard of that dumb word careers before. And so I won't know what the heck we're talking about." (Junie B. Jones and her Big Fat Mouth, p. 2)

When she thinks people in class are gossiping about her:

“They whispered to each other for a real long time. Also, they kept looking at me. And they wouldn't even stop." (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 66)

When someone asks her about the library:

“It's where the books are. And guess what? Books are my very favorite things in the whole world!" (Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, p. 27)

When she doesn't know what she's eating at the caf:

“I peeked inside the bread. I stared and stared for a real long time. 'Cause I didn't actually recognize the meat, that's why. Finally, I ate it anyway. It was tasty...whatever it was." (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 66)

When she gets bored during class:

“I drew a sausage patty on my arm. Only that wasn't even an assignment." (Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren, p. 18)

When she considers dropping out:

“Maybe someday I will just be the Boss of Cookies instead!" (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 76)

When her friends invite her to the lake for Labor Day:

“GOOD NEWS! I CAN COME TO THE LAKE WITH YOU, I BELIEVE!" (Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, p. 17)

When her professor never enters grades on time:

“I rolled my eyes way up to the sky." (Junie B., First Grader Boss of Lunch, p. 38)

When her friends won't stop poking her on Facebook:


“Do not poke me one more time, and I mean it." (Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, p. 7)

When she finds out she got a bad test grade:

“Then my eyes got a little bit wet. I wasn't crying, though." (Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus, p. 17)

When she isn't allowed to have a pet on campus but really wants one:

“FISH STICK! I NAMED HIM FISH STICK BECAUSE HE'S A FISH STICK, OF COURSE!" (Junie B. Jones Smells Something Fishy, p. 59)

When she has to walk across campus in the dark:

“There's no such thing as monsters. There's no such thing as monsters." (Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed, p. 12)

When her boyfriend breaks her heart:

“I am a bachelorette. A bachelorette is when your boyfriend named Ricardo dumps you at recess. Only I wasn't actually expecting that terrible trouble." (Junie B. Jones Is (almost) a Flower Girl, p. 1)

When she paints her first canvas:


"And painting is the funnest thing I love!" (Junie B. Jones and her Big Fat Mouth, p. 61)

When her sorority takes stacked pictures:

“The biggie kids stand in the back. And the shortie kids stand in the front. I am a shortie kid. Only that is nothing to be ashamed of." (Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed, p. 7)

When she's had enough of the caf's food:

“Want to bake a lemon pie? A lemon pie would be fun, don't you think?" (Junie B. Jones Has a Monster Under Her Bed p. 34)

When she forgets about an exam:

“Speechless is when your mouth can't speech." (Junie B. Jones Loves Handsome Warren, p. 54)

When she finds out she has enough credits to graduate:

“A DIPLOMA! A DIPLOMA! I WILL LOVE A DIPLOMA!" (Junie B. Jones is a Graduation Girl p. 6)

When she gets home from college:

"IT'S ME! IT'S JUNIE B. JONES! I'M HOME FROM MY SCHOOL!" (Junie B. Jones and some Sneaky Peaky Spying p. 20)

Cover Image Credit: OrderOfBooks

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