12 freedom quotes to remind you to be proud to be an American every single day

12 freedom quotes to remind you to be proud to be an American every single day

"You're welcome." -- George Washington

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The Fourth of July is a party holiday, plain and simple.

The difference between singing along to the words "proud to be an American" and actually meaning them is major. Appreciating our freedom and country should be continuously held in high esteem, not only on days where the hotdogs and sparklers remind you to do so.

Something about sitting under exploding fireworks seems to awaken the inner patriot in most of us, though this patriotism should be just as fierce every single day of the year.

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1. "Freedom is the atmosphere in which humanity thrives. Breathe it in." --Richelle E. Goodrich

2. "Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains of slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take but as for me; give me liberty or give me death!" --Patrick Henry

3. "In the truest sense, freedom cannot be bestowed. It must be achieved." --Franklin D. Roosevelt

4. "Freedom has its life in the hearts, the actions, the spirit of men and so it must be daily earned and refreshed - else like a flower cut from its life- giving roots, it will wither and die." --Dwight Eisenhower

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5. "The greatest revolution in the history of man, past, present, and future, is the revolution of those determined to be free."

6. "Nothing is more difficult, and therefore more precious, than to be able to decide." -- Napoleon Bonaparte

7. "I am an American; free born and free bred, where I acknowledge no man as my superior, except for his own worth, or as my inferior, except for his own detriment." --Theodore Roosevelt

8. "Conformity is the jailer of freedom and the enemy of growth." --John F. Kennedy

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9. "America is another name for opportunity." --Ralph Waldo Emerson

10. "Intellectually, I know that America is no better than any other country. Emotionally, I know she is better than every other country." --Sinclair Lewis

11. "We must be free not because we claim freedom, but because we practice it." --William Faulkner

12. "Life without liberty is like a body without a spirit." --Kahlil Gibran


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7 Signs You're From the 732

Only the best part of New Jersey.
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If you're from New Jersey, you know how badly the state's looked down upon by outsiders (thanks a lot, Jersey Shore). But you know that all of those false accusations aren't true- the Garden State is your home and only you're allowed to make fun of it. Although Jersey's small, there are different regions and everyone thinks that their's is the best. Here are seven signs you're from the 732, AKA the best part of Jersey:

1. You know that Central Jersey is a place.

One of the biggest arguments is whether or not Central Jersey exists. I live in the middle of New Jersey, so it's pretty funny when people say it's not a real place. I'm not from South Jersey, and definitely not from North Jersey. Also, it's close to both Philadelphia and New York, not just one or the other. Perfect location.

2. Everywhere you go, you see a Wawa.

Legit everywhere, and you go there 24/7. All hail the holy grail.

3. Surf Taco means a lot to you.

Every time I come home from being away at school the first place I go to eat with my friends is Surf Taco. Even when I am home, Surf Taco's always on my mind. Who doesn't love a good taco with chips? P.S. I highly recommend their Teriyaki Chicken Taco, you won't regret it.

4. You go to all the summer concerts.

There's really nothing more fun than summer shows outside, and you already know that PNC Bank Arts Center and Stone Pony Summer Stage are the hot-spots. 'Tis the season of tailgating and enjoying a good show with your friends.

5. Two words: Pork. Roll.

I don't care what Chris Christie has to say, it's pork roll. Quite honestly, Taylor Ham just doesn't sound right. And what's better than a pork roll egg n' cheese on your favorite bagel? Nothing.

6. You live close to the beach...

Spring Lake, Manasquan, Asbury, you name it. You know these areas and where all of the good food spots are in each of them. Living so close to the beach makes for the perfect summers, but with summer comes the bennies.

7. ...So you can easily spot a benny.

If you're from Jersey and you don't know what a benny is, you most likely are one. Bennies usually come in packs; they bring lawn chairs and tents to the beach, wear socks and sandals, and have the "Jersey accent" because they're either from New York or close to.


Cover Image Credit: Wikimedia commons

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Tempe City Council Makes An Effort To Hear The Public's Concerns

The rising number of homeless in Tempe is concerning for many residents and here's why.

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Many concerned Tempe residents voiced that it is not the homeless people trying to get back on their feet that concern them. It is the rising group of homeless drug addicts causing havoc and endangering their neighborhoods does.

Randy Keating and Robin Arredondo-Savage, two members of the Tempe City Council, met with concerned residents on Tuesday at the Multigenerational Center to discuss the rise of homelessness in the area.

Tempe police chief Sylvia Moir assured the public that the police department is doing all it can to make sure their opinions are heard.

"We have to recognize that sleeping is a basic human right, even when it comes to our parks. If the shelters don't have space, the person still needs to sleep somewhere. With that being said, the homeless will have a curfew enforced and will be held accountable for their actions," Moir said.

Suzanne Orarke, a Tempe resident and mother voiced her opinion on why the rising number of drug addicted and mentally unstable homeless people concerns her.

"I have an 8-year-old son and he rides his bike to school every day. I don't want to be a helicopter parent, but at the same time, I also don't want to lose my child to something stupid," Orarke said.

Keating and Arredondo-Savage assured the public that the City Council works with the police department and the Homeless Outreach Prevention Effort team, also known as the HOPE team to find solutions to the homelessness in Tempe. The Councilmembers informed the audience that Tempe spends the most money of any Arizona city on human services.

The Councilmembers reminded the public that homelessness is not a crime and that they are doing their best to accommodate to the rising number of homeless people, which has gone up 60 percent in Maricopa County the last two years.

Another homeless related issue that many residents have noticed is the dangerous use of Lime scooters in their neighborhoods. Lime is a California-based company known for its easily accessible scooters.

The scooters, which run for 15 cents per minute, have increasingly made their way into the East Valley. The scooters have made it easier for the homeless to travel with little to no cost. Many residents believe this is attracting them to their neighborhoods.

When asked about scooter regulations, Keating said, "There is not much regulation for these scooters yet, but there is a working group striving to regulate those as we recognize this is an issue. We are looking over the list of recommendations next Thursday. As of right now, the only regulation is that the scooters cannot be on sidewalks."

The last major issue the public spoke on is the lack of helpful and respectful assistance from the police department and their non-emergency hotline. Many residents recalled their experiences when calling the non-emergency hotline and each resident had a negative outcome.

Steve Geiogamah, a concerned Tempe resident, relived his experience with the non-emergency hotline as he explained what took place a few nights ago.

"I've started to see a rise in drug activity among the homeless in Tempe. One night, I saw a transient in the neighborhood, who looked like they were up to no good. I called the non-emergency line and asked them to send an officer," Geiogamah said. "The next morning, I saw nothing had been done. I called dispatch again and they said that they could not send an officer even though I was concerned about the issue taking place."

Moir took responsibility for the hotlines wrongdoings and ended the meeting by saying, "If there are behaviors that you observe among the homeless, that rise to the level where you need a police officer, call the non-emergency number. Or, if it's immediate or a real serious issue, call 911. Describe the person and request an officer. The expectation is that we trace the call and that an officer responds."

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