Promotional Culture and Us
Start writing a post
Community

Promotional Culture and Us

Promotional culture revolves around us..

36
Promotional Culture and Us

To me, promotional culture means an array of things. From the feminist ads on the bilboards to a social media platform trying to take over the youth and become part of a subculture, there is so much meaning behind “promotional culture” and how our generation of consumers can define it.

I want to start by saying that promotional culture cannot exist without us, the consumers. I think that promotional culture is able to constantly transform and change through us and how we use promotional culture in our daily lives, when we buy or consume products or media. I was able to learn that we are the catalysts for promotional culture and how we see or consume media affects the outlook of promotional culture and what it can mean today. We are the everyday experiments and lab rats of promotional culture

I think every time we give a part of ourselves away to promotional culture, we are also giving away our standing ground as individuals in a new emerging digital society. The digital society can’t exist without us, the consumers and yet, we are giving that part of us away every time we fall victim to promotional culture.

I think promotional culture has taught me to be more awake and alert to the ways in which goods and services are being advertised to us. It doesn’t help being a naive person trying to navigate consumer society and culture. For someone to navigate consumer society and culture effectively without falling victim to promotional culture, one has to be alert and attentive to cues. I’ve learned that these cues can range from a lot of things, from the ways in which companies and platforms try to advertise a new product or brand to us, to personal branding.

One thing I enjoyed learning about promotional culture is personal branding. I think this is something that I was able to relate to a lot, from the things I’ve learned about promotional culture this semester.

What I particularly enjoyed about learning about personal branding in the promotional media class I have taken is how personal branding provides consumers a way in which they can be their true selves, away from what promotional culture or society expects of them. I thought that personal branding was a great way for someone to come out of the societal or cultural expectations of them and bring a new way to tackle promotional culture.

When I learned about personal branding, I realized that it sounded a lot like a defense mechanism against promotional culture and how it can try to change us so we can better fit in with the rest of society or what the society expects us to be like. I think from what I’ve learned about promotional culture this semester, personal branding is what sets us apart from other people.

A real life example of promotional culture that I can think of is how only the promoters can get paid when people see a live show. I think it is crazy how only the promoters get paid in this aspect that other people have also done the work. I think the other people deserve to get paid too and that promotional culture can cause inequality amongst performers who have put in just as much, if not more effort on the live show.

I think this is also where promotional culture can lead people in the wrong direction, especially for those who get paid when other don’t. Any performance, such as a live show includes all the people performing in it, not just the promoters. Yes, it’s true that the promoters have “promoted” the live show, but there are also people in the live show that is actually doing the “performing” and distributing the show aspect of the performance.

Although promoters do a large portion of the job of getting people to see the live show, this shouldn’t mean they deserve to be paid more. I think this is where I learned promotional culture can be “dangerous” and lead people to think that promoters are the most important aspect of consumer society.

We often ignore the people who do the work backstage and contribute to the greater sense of a performance, because of the promoters. Yes, “promoting” a performance is important, but it’s also important to perform or create the performance. Promoting something doesn’t mean the work is finished, or that is all there is to it. We can’t promote something that isn’t there, which is why we have to appreciate the work of those who are not the promoters.

This is the part where I disagree with promotional culture and the aspects of it. Promotional culture overlooks some of the people that get the job done and pays more attention to those who promote the job or the thing that is trying to be sold or noticed by consumers. What about the people that have actually spent the time and energy making the product? What about the performers who have spent an endless amount of time preparing and getting ready to perform? Where do they fall into?

If we want promotional culture to be appreciated more positively or at least fall into a more positive light by the consumers and the rest of society, we have to start making sure that it’s not only those “promoting” that are getting all the money or attention. That is not fair to those who have done all the work. I think that’s one of the things that is hazardous about promotional culture. It follows the ideology that those who do the more “advertising, social, element” of something is bound to get more noticed than those who do the more “menial, mechanical” parts of the performance or making of a good or service.

If we think about it, the companies that hire people in different countries and parts of the world to pick up and gather the materials to make the product, don’t get as much attention as the people who are trying to sell the product. These people are often overlooked and no one really takes a moment to appreciate how hard they have worked to make sure that we have the goods or service that we are using right now. There are children in other parts of the world, who are starving and in poor health, climbing trees and doing child labor and other dangerous work to make sure we have our platforms and goods ready to use.

Promotional culture lacks the empathy part of it all and this needs to change. What I’ve learned about promotional culture is also how it follows a “queen bee” type of dynamic, where the more popular, people at the upper level of the hierarchy/power system are more likely to get noticed. It reminds me of how everyone at school is scared of and only listens to the queen bees, rather than their own intuitions or those who are way below the queen bees.

Report this Content
This article has not been reviewed by Odyssey HQ and solely reflects the ideas and opinions of the creator.
Featured

How I Went From Pro-Life To Pro-Choice

"No one can make you do this."

2164
msra.org

I was raised in a strict, Irish-Catholic family. My parents and grandparents, even though I love them, instilled many beliefs in me that I came to disagree with as I grew older, things like "homosexuality is weird and wrong." I eventually rejected many of these ideas once I began growing into myself, but there was always one belief I let ring true well into my teen years: abortion is the murder of an unborn baby.

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

Trip to The City of Dreams

In a city that never sleeps, with constant bustling and hustling in the streets, my friend and I venture out to see what the "Big Apple" is all about.

1304
Trip to The City of Dreams

There are so many ways for one to describe the beautiful city of New York. It is breathtaking, exciting and alive all in one. Taking a trip here was absolutely the adventure of a lifetime for me and I'm so grateful to have gotten to see all there is to do in the "City of Dreams" with one of my best friends.

Keep Reading... Show less
Featured

a God story.

testimony.

6111
a God story.

many of you have someone in your life you admire the most. a parent, a superhero, a celebrity.

Keep Reading... Show less
Religion

God, What's Next?

What you're probably asking yourself during your season of waiting.

5116
God, What's Next?

We spend most of our lives waiting for something. Maybe you're waiting for a job opportunity to open up, or for a professor to email you back because you procrastinated on your assignment, or maybe you're waiting for the next chapter in your life to start. Whatever the case maybe be for you I want to let you know that your season of waiting is not in vain! It may seem like it but your season of waiting is a crucial part in your walk with Christ. You may not have a walk with Christ and I encourage you to be open to starting a relationship with him but even your time of waiting isn't in vain. Waiting is a hard thing to do but it is so worth it in the end. The Bible even tells us this in Ecclesiastes.

Keep Reading... Show less

Subscribe to Our Newsletter

Facebook Comments