On April 15th, 2019, the world suffered a major loss. Notre Dame was more than a cathedral, it was a global landmark. It affects all of us, not just those who practice a certain form of religion.

When I was watching this priceless monument burn on live television, I felt it to my core. Not just because I believe in the Big Guy upstairs and all the things that come with it, but because I felt the loss of culture. I've been to Paris (for, like, a day, but still I had time to explore) and didn't get a chance to see Notre Dame. That being said, I'm not coming from a ~oh I'm so cultured because I studied abroad~ angle. I'm coming to you as a person who has a deep appreciation for global unification.

It baffles me that there are people who don't see the loss of Notre Dame as a historical and worldwide loss. Even if you don't have an appreciation for history (which you should, it's about time you grew out of that mindset), you have to acknowledge that history is what shaped our culture today. Appreciation for culture is what makes a person human. And Notre Dame was a beacon of world culture.

The building itself was history: the construction started in 1163 and ended in 1345. The cathedral's gothic architecture, stained glass windows, and breathtaking interior took 182 years to complete, bringing historians to their knees. From one small fire, the monument's timbre base whipped out 654 years of history.

Not to mention the crazy amount of historical artifacts and documents that were stored in the cathedral were put in danger. Thankfully, a lot of them were saved/can still be salvaged. However, one has to keep in mind that these precious artifacts that are over 100 years old still experienced a fire. Guys, they don't even let you touch these things because they are so fragile—imagine a fire.

One of those historical treasures was believed to be the crown of thorns Jesus wore during the crucifixion. The crown of thorns was saved, but could you imagine if it wasn't? An iconic relic would have been lost forever.

Okay, regardless of your religious beliefs, that is straight up as historically unifying as it gets. Listen, I'm not a fan of institutionalized religion, but there are only a few things that connect our world. The Bible is still the most read book in the world. It's facts. Whether you're a fan or not, you are still semi-familiar with the history of Jesus. Also, facts. There is no denying it: you've heard of Easter and you've heard of Christmas. Even if the crown wasn't the literal crown Jesus wore when he was called "King of the Jews," you should still have sympathy for world culture.

You're a person who lives on planet earth, you can't be apathetic about this tragedy. You just can't.

Not to mention, the slow burning of Notre Dame—the "Mother of France"—destroyed the Parisians' spirit, and that can't be ignored. As global citizens, we need to support Paris during this difficult time. As global citizens, we have to support anyone who has felt this tremendous loss.