How Plastic Trash Hurts Marine Animals

Your Plastic Trash Is Turning Our Oceans' Marine Life Into Marine Death

We destroy life and pollute the oceans and skies, yet we have the audacity to call ourselves superior beings.

458
views

More than one million marine animals die each year due to the overuse of plastic materials.

If you take a walk along the beach or swim in the ocean, you are bound to see some sort of trash. This trash does no good to those animals who are in the oceans. If we are doing something and we step on a piece of trash, we are able to pull it off, but the marine life cannot. The trash sticks with them, and sometimes it might come off.

We are killing the wildlife with the plastic and the trash.

Throughout the past few years, the marine life population has been declining. The ocean is a vital part of our food chain, feeding billions of people around the globe, and helps keep us alive. The world over fishes in the oceans, and empties trash into our oceans.

If you become aware of your daily living, plastic is used for everything. Plastic soda bottles, plastic chip bags, plastic grocery bags, plastic wrappers, and so much more plastic. Think about all the plastic straws we use, that plastic goes right now the esophagus for the marine life animals.

The amount of plastic in this world will take millions of years to actually break down. The plastic is not broken down fast enough.

But, until then, our oceans are getting all the plastic we are using.

All these plastics look appetizing to the marine life animals — they do not know it can harm them. For example, a bag floating looks appetizing to a turtle because it looks like it is a jellyfish floating up and down.

Humans average a total of 14 billion pounds of waste into the oceans per year. This number keeps reaching its peak every single year. Researchers have shown by the year 2040 the amount of plastic in the sea will be higher than the actual sum of marine life.

It is a proven fact that fish are not growing because they mistakenly eat the plastic more than their regular food. The waste usually comes from coastal areas, but some make it ways through inland waterways into the ocean. The plastic gets stuck into the marine life bodies along with toxic chemicals and bacterial absorbed by the material.

Plastic rings are a big thing — the six-pack of beer, soda and/or drinks.

Those plastic non-biodegradable rings are getting stuck around the sea animals, the sea animals are eating them as well. It is known that a company in Florida called Saltwater Brewery actually created edible six-pack rings. These rings are completely 100% biodegradable. It was a big investment for the Saltwater Brewery, but they state "it was completely worth it."

It baffles me how people can let these animals digest, get tangled and die because they can't reduce plastic usage and/or not throw the plastic into the oceans. More programs should be set up to pick up beach trash and cleaning the oceans. Even though every single piece of trash won't get out of the waters. A little help can make a world of difference to the marine life.

Stop littering your trash, become aware of the amount of plastic you actually use, pick up trash off the beach if you see it there and become educated on those marine life animals.

The ocean is calling for help, and you need to be their voice.

"For the wildest things on Earth, the future must depend on the conscience of mankind" — Dr. Carr



Popular Right Now

45 Things Day Care Workers Say All Too Often

Toddlers are pretty much tiny, drunk people.
59008
views

Being the keeper of tiny humans can be a very interesting job. You are constantly breaking up arguments, cleaning up messes, trying to keep them safe, and telling them not to do things that are well, sometimes pretty weird. They do and say the strangest things that'll make you wonder what is really going on in their little heads.

1. "No no no, don't do *something crashes to the floor* ....that."

2. "Bubbles in your mouths every body!"

3. "No, we don't eat our friend's snack."

4. "Hands to yourself."

5. "Get off of the table before you hurt yourself."

6. "Why do we even give them spoons?"

7. "We don't put toys in our mouths"

8. "Did you wash your hands?"

9. "Where do we run? Where are we right now?"

10. "Where are your shoes?"

11. "We don't talk like that here."

12. "Go tell them you're sorry"

13. "Get your finger out of your nose"

14. "Inside voices please!"

15. "Every one find a buddy."

16. "Ew ew ew, some body get me a tissue!"

17. "How did your shoes untie already? I just tied them five minutes ago."

18. "We do nice with our hands."

19. "Oh god, it's spaghetti day."

20. "Please, do not put noodles in your hair."

21. "Hold hands until we are on the play ground!"

22. "5 little monkeys jumping on the bed, one fell off and bumped his head..."

23. "Do you have to poop?"

24. "Well you should at least try."

25. "Why didn't you go to the potty before we went outside."

26. "If I hear "Let it go" one more time..."

27. "Hot dog, hot dog, hot diggity dog.."

28. "Mommy and Daddy will come back, I promise."

29. "No, no biting!"

30. "She had it first, you'll just have to wait until she's done."

31. "Ew, why are you dipping everything in applesauce?"

32. "Now, are you going to eat the vegetable with the ranch or just the ranch?"

33. "Then why did you say you weren't eating snack?"

34. "Put your arms back in your sleeves."

35. *Five minutes before closing* "Where are your parents??"

36. "I finally got him to sleep, everyone be quiet."

37. *You see one eye open* "Oh no..."

38. "Wow, all your kids are still sleeping!?" (We wish we said this more often)

39. "Don't eat that, it was on the floor!"

40. "Glue the google eyes on here." *puts the eyes anywhere but there*

41. "Stop fighting over who's going to turn off the lights, you'll get a turn tomorrow."

42. "Don't shove so much food in your mouth at once, you'll choke!"

43. "Chew and swallow your food before you get up."

45. "Don't touch anything until we wash your hands!"

As weird as these small people are, they are some of the sweetest beings on the planet. And although they drive you crazy, at the end of the day, they make you love your job.


Cover Image Credit: http://i.huffpost.com/gen/1223221/images/o-KIDS-MESS-facebook.jpg

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Berkeley Lab Breakthrough Brings Hope For Recyclable Plastics

Facing pressures to stop the build-up of plastic, there's finally renewed hope.

67
views

A potential solution to recycling plastics has been found at Berkeley Lab by scientists who published their findings in Nature Chemistry. We currently face a $2.5 trillion impact from plastic pollution worldwide. Not only has this negatively affected the global ecosystem, other impacted areas include fisheries, recreation, and heritage. What's more, only 9.1% of plastics made in the U.S. in 2015 were recycled, down from 9.5% the previous year.

Traditional plastics can't be recycled due to their chemical composition which puts a strain on the recycling system.

Ultimately, plastics are disposed of which harms ecosystems and animals and clogs up waterways, or burned which releases CO2 emissions. Plastics are disposed of rather than recycled as they are a byproduct of petroleum, made of molecules known as polymers, which are made of compounds containing carbon, known as monomers. When the chemicals and the plastic are combined for commercial use, the monomers bind with the chemicals. The process at the recycling plant becomes difficult because without being able to adequately separate the chemicals and the monomers, the results of the new products are unpredictable.

This is where the Berkeley Lab breakthrough becomes important. The scientists discovered a new way to assemble the plastics at a molecular level and reuse them into new materials of any color, shape or form. It's called PDK

Also known as poly(diketoenamine), this new plastic material could reverse the pile-up of plastics at recycling plants because, at a chemical level, the carbon-based molecules and polymers are reversible through an acid bath process.

Lead author Peter Christensen, on why the study was needed and why this breakthrough is important, is because "most plastics were never made to be recycled." The goal with this product is to create a circular lifeline for plastic where it can be recycled and used for numerous products like adhesives, phone cases, and computer cables.

Since PDK only exists in the lab, for now, it is important to remember that progress doesn't happen overnight. Brett Helms, a staff scientist at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, is excited about this breakthrough because of the "opportunity to make a difference for where there are no recycling options." However, the landscape is looking grim. Despite the efforts of countries to curb and stop the use of plastic, the amount of plastic is still increasing and spreading. Therefore, it is our job to continue to recycle and continue our current efforts, until PDK becomes readily available for commercial use.

Related Content

Facebook Comments