Kylie Jenner Should Not Have Been On The Forbes Cover, Here's Why

Kylie Jenner Should Not Have Been On The Forbes Cover, Here's Why

Instead of starting from the bottom, she started from the top and rose even further.

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Recently, the cover of Forbes August 31st issue was released to the public. And on the cover was none other than America's cosmetic queen, Kylie Jenner, alongside the statement "At 21, She's Set To Be America's Youngest Ever Self-Made Billionaire." This statement, no, this small phrase, "self-made," stirred up a lot of discontent, hate, and genuine confusion.

The Oxford Dictionaries define self-made as achieving success or money with your own effort. Kylie is both successful and rich and she put in the effort to get where she is today. Sure, Kylie Jenner has a lot more resources, publicity, and connections than the average fledgling businesswoman does, but does this truly mean she's not self-made? All businessmen and women leverage their connections and assets to be successful. The only difference is Kylie had an upper-hand. Instead of starting from the bottom, she started from the top and rose even further.

I'm not saying Kylie Jenner is a person without any faults. But she was able to turn one of her biggest insecurities and create a multimillion dollar corporation out of it. Like the cover says, she was able to leverage her fame to produce a successful business.

Her unique background just offered her more space to fail and get back up than the average person.

Maybe Kylie is self-made in the same way that Kim Jong Un is one of the greatest democratically elected leaders. Or maybe Kylie falls into this new category of self-made people in this new technological era. Either way, I do not think Kylie deserves as much hate as she gets. If she wasn't doing anything and just living off of her inheritance, then people would perhaps criticize her for being lazy. But when she creates her own company, people tell her she only got this far because of her family.

Personally, I do not think Kylie should have been on the cover if she was going to be included in this list. This was an opportunity to showcase other women. Women who are self-made in the traditional sense. This could have been an opportunity to hear their inspiring stories because, for the most part, we all know the story of America's youngest self-made billionaire. Although we can probably guess why they put her on the cover.

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Not Saying She Isn't Spoiled, But Olivia Jade Is A Victim Of Her Parents' Poor Choices

Because of decisions her parents made, she has not only been made a laughing stock but the face of major scrutiny.

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If you watch any TV or are on any social media platforms, you've heard about the Lori Loughlin scandal that alleges she paid a total of $1 million to get her daughters into college.

It's truly crazy, but at the same time, I always suspected this type of bribery and deceit happened, not necessarily with this family but with other well-to-do people. I grew up knowing education and life were political, and I mean, look at all the rich students in Harvard and Yale. You really think all of them got in because they scored perfect scores on the SATs?

No. It's because their parents basically paid for their education and then some, too. More often than not, those parents are generally alumni as well, who got into school themselves the same way they're handling their children's education: through money.

What's sad, though, to me is that as someone who attends college, works hard for their education and has student loans, these parents don't realize the true shame to their actions. The ironic part is that they thought it would be more shameful for their children to not go to college than for them to be bought in.

What's ultimately shameful is that these parents didn't believe in their children's abilities and dreams.

I'm not a fan of Olivia Jade, who is the daughter of Lori Loughlin and whose education was bought. I've seen her face pop up on YouTube and Instagram once or twice, but I never paid much attention to her.

Even though I don't follow her, I still feel bad for her. Because her parents forced her hand into this education debauchery, she has taken the brunt of the storm, too.

Across social media, she has been shamed for this scandal, for not wanting education and for being spoiled. Her YouTube videos are being clipped into 15-second cuts of her saying she didn't want to go to school, that her parents ultimately forced her to go, and how the only parts she looks forward to are the parties and football games.

But honestly, if I was doing the thing I love without needing an education, I wouldn't go to college either.

I think people forget that education is a choice. Just because she didn't want to go doesn't mean she's stupid. Although her job as a social media influencer may seem like a joke to many, that joke pays hundreds of thousands of people each year millions of dollars.

As the saying goes, work smarter not harder.

Anyone who hates on social media influencers are really just jealous, maybe not of the role itself, but of the money it brings for the seemingly little work they do for it.

Education truly is subjective. Some people learn better in classrooms, some people learn better doing hands-on work. For social media influencers, it's learning from the trade and other people who do the same profession as well.

The job may not be the most respectable work I've seen, but it's something that supports families worldwide and allows people to fulfill their dreams of traveling, acting, working on video, becoming photographers and sharing advice. You know, just because this may not be mine or everyone else's dream jobs doesn't mean that it isn't someone else's.

It's easy to criticize people for their actions and dreams, but I find that the people who attack others the most understand the least.

Did Lori Loughlin do a really despicable thing to her daughters? Honestly, yeah. If my parents didn't believe I could amount to much without education and couldn't do it on my own, I would be heartbroken. I'm sure her daughters feel this too, and now on top of it, they're the laughing stock of social media for not only being "stupid," but for being more rich kids who depend on their mommies and daddies for everything.

What's crazy is that Olivia is already worth $300,000 at 19 years old, while I'm 22 and have $15 dollars to my name (not literally, but you get the point). Everyone's attacking this girl, but looking at her numbers, I'm thinking she's doing something right.

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Dear Olivia Jade

An expression of concern on behalf of the student body.

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Dear Olivia Jade,

Almost nineteen years ago I was born in Long Beach, California, to an immigrant mother and a father who would soon be essentially jobless. Both my parents went back to school when I was a child - my father got his law degree online and is now a public defender, and my mother got her degree in biology from Fresno State. It was incredibly difficult for both of them to do this and raise three children, but they did, and I am eternally grateful. From a young age, I was taught that education is important. You make sacrifices for it. It means a lot more to people than game days and partying.

Unfortunately, they never taught me that this country's educational system is incredibly classist (I have Twitter and my AP Composition teacher in high school to thank for that). For this demonstration, I'm going to have to talk about myself more - I'm sure as a vlogger you understand. When I applied to USC, I had a 3.8 GPA, took 9 AP classes, was heavily involved in choir, started a club for mental health awareness, and had written decent essays. I worked hard in high school, and I deserved to get in. But I was pretty privileged compared to most kids. I lived in a two bedroom apartment with my dad, but we were living comfortably. I had a laptop to study with, and if I needed anything for school he was there to support me. Furthermore, my high school's average family income was in the upper 9% compared to other schools, and having rich parents around means bigger donations, smaller class sizes, more extracurricular opportunities and overall a better quality education. The environment I was in encouraged me to succeed in a system where a degree from an elite university is seen as the key to entering the 1%, even though the only people who can truly afford it are in that top 1%. But I was grateful for the opportunities I had been given, and I chose USC because I thought that in the long run, it was worth the financial risk.

Still, sometimes I wished I was like you. You, with your famous parents, YouTube money, millions of followers, and excellent bone structure. You, with your carefree attitude about school, not having to worry about your midterms, not having to worry about getting a job, not having to worry about financial aid. But the fact of the matter is, whether or not you knew about the entire scam, you sit on a throne of privilege and lies. You were admitted to USC because your parents bribed your way in. You and your sister received scholarships from USC when they could have gone to two students who were much more deserving.

I'll admit, when this story broke it hurt me on a personal level. Right now I'm considering taking a year off from school and preparing to transfer, because I literally cannot afford to go here, and it is devastating. I can't tell you how bad it feels, as someone who worked so hard despite struggling with mental illness and was even hospitalized in high school, to get a reality check only halfway through your first semester that going to your dream school is no longer feasible. And I'm not alone. I have too many friends in similar situations, who have either accepted their impending debt, or who may drop out. We are the minority at USC, but the unfortunate majority of college students. We aren't here to have fun, we're here to get a degree. To get a job. To not disappoint our parents who sacrificed so much for us. To survive.

And that's why you should drop out.

At orientation, we were all told the five traits of a Trojan: faithful, skillful, scholarly, courageous, and ambitious. I do not know you well enough to know if you are faithful, courageous, or ambitious (skillful at social media and marketing, maybe), but you are most certainly not scholarly (aside from the whole mom paying $500,000 to get you in thing, your school-hating tweets are further proof). And if you and your sister don't drop out of USC, you won't have any integrity either. Two hard-working, bright, and deserving transfer applicants will be denied the opportunity of getting to study at an amazing school because of you taking their spots. They need this degree. You don't.

If, by a long shot, you're reading this, I hope you don't see this letter as a personal attack, rather, advice. An expression of concern on behalf of the student body. After all, you don't need a college degree to party in LA.

Sincerely,

A broke, frustrated, yet hopeful college student.

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