Being In A Sorority Is more Than Paying For Friends

Being In A Sorority Is So Much More Than 'Paying To Have Friends'

You don't know about sororities.

231
views

There is a lot of stigma around sororities and Greek life in general. People who aren't in a sorority tend to have a negative view of them, and honestly, I don't blame them. From the outside, it looks like we're a bunch of girls paying to have friends....which is true. But sororities give you so much more than just friendship. The number of things I've learned, been taught and gained from joining a sorority is so much more than I ever knew.

When I first thought about rushing a sorority, I was a bit nervous. I felt like it was weird to basically speed date a bunch of girls for two weeks and somehow find a place where I "belonged." However, I did girl flirt, and oh did the awkward process pay off. When I first joined my sorority, I really had no idea that I would end up calling these girls my best friends. I had no idea that I would have endless mentors, tutors, leadership opportunities or friends to volunteer with.

So, yes, I pay for much more than just friendship.

If I'm lost in a class or don't understand the material, I can almost always find someone who has taken it before and is willing to help me. If I can't immediately find someone to help me, I can always turn to someone at our study tables to teach me the material. I strive to keep my GPA up because our sorority gives out rewards when you do. I constantly have a support system that wants to see me succeed almost more than I want to see myself succeed.

So yes, I pay for much more than just friendship.

I give back. As a sorority member, you are asked to do community outreach and gain volunteer hours. If I didn't have the push to be a good citizen, then I'm not sure if I would always find the time to do so. But, with the help of my friends, we can volunteer together, and it instantly becomes even more rewarding. I feel like I'm a part of something so much bigger when I get to help raise money for a cause so dear to me and my friends' hearts.

So, yes, I pay for much more than just friendship.

I joined clubs. Sometimes it's hard to fit extracurriculars into your schedule. But when your friends are passionate about something like the environment, then you automatically find yourself passionate about it too. I can thank my sorority for sparking an interest in me that I didn't know was there.

So, thanks to my friends, I'm active outside of just my sorority and schoolwork.

I don't think that everyone needs to take part in Greek life because it isn't for everyone. But I do think that people look at it superficially instead of just trying to really understand what they're like. I have gained amazing friends, but I've also gained experience that I can use on not only my resume but in life. I'm more of a well-rounded student and person thanks to my sorority.

Popular Right Now

7 Reasons You Should Order A Vodka/Water/Lime When You're Out

There’s a reason the Vodka/Water/Lime is the number one drink at The Strip every weekend.
74869
views

We’ve all been through it. Whether it was sometime in high school, out freshman year of college or the day we turned 21, at some point you have or will tried to order a drink while you’re out on the town. I’m here to end all the experimentation, and give you a go-to drink that is sweeping across college campuses everywhere, the Vodka-Water-Lime, and the reasons why, are clear to see.

1. It will keep you hydrated

It may seem trivial but hydration is key if you’re planning on drinking any amount any time, or so I have been told. But let’s face it, biology grants us the ability to chug concoctions called 4-Lokos with ease while drinking the recommended amount of water per day almost impossible. The drink that solves both issues—Vodka-Water-Lime.

2. It doesn't taste that bad

I’ll admit I was a little skeptical at first, but this drink isn’t that bad to swallow, especially when you think about some of the other things you could be drinking. There’s a reason why the only way people can drink tequila is in shot from or in a lime slushy. As the old saying goes: if you drink enough everything just tastes like water, and this one already has water in it!

3. It gets you drunk

That’s right. It does the job. Isn’t that really all we want in a drink anyway, everything else is just trivial.

4. It establishes immediate common-ground

What is that girl next to you at the bar about to order? You guessed it. Now imagine that you are about to order the same thing, she is practically begging to dance on you at this point, it’s that easy.

5. Easy, Quick, Universal

There are just three simple ingredients, and the amounts of which are subject to your personal preference and tolerance levels. It doesn’t require the aid of Chet the self-proclaimed mixologist to make—it’s so easy a baby could do it! And it’s known virtually everywhere, if you’re ever in a place that doesn’t have either vodka, water, or limes, you’re probably there against your will anyway.

6. Health Benefits

Since most people don’t drink liquor straight, the use of a chaser or mixer is required, but we all know the problems that causes. Sugar and alcohol don’t mix well, not to mention the calories in soda. Vodka-Water-Lime has not calories and no sugar added. On top of that, the presence of water and lack of soda is almost a guarantee that you won’t be hungover the next day.

7. It's shameless

With all of the numerous benefits, it’s impossible to give someone a hard time for ordering this, yet it happens. Becky’s friends may tell her that she looks great and shouldn’t be concerned about her calories. WELL MAYBE BECKY JUST LIKES THE TASTE. Still, Bradley may get bold and order one out with the boys, but since there’s nothing to crack open, he may be the butt of their jokes, but Bradley knows that he made the right choice.

NOTE: limes can be substituted for other in-season citrus fruits.


There’s a reason the Vodka-Water-Lime is the number one drink at The Strip every week. The facts are there; it’s not fake news. Vodka-Water-Lime should be your new drink. It’s not just something you adopt in college or for a few nights out, it’s a lifestyle. The Vodka-Water-Lime is classy and sophisticated, it is a drink that you can order somewhere fancy like a restaurant or a Carnival cruise ship, or even on your wedding night.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Joining A Panhellenic Sorority As A Woman Of Color

It didn't matter that I looked different than everyone else, it mattered that I was me.

117
views

A part of me always wanted to be part of a sorority. Not because of the superficial part of it—like the parties and the formals—but because of feeling like you "belonged." When I was in high school, I saw pictures of girls who had graduated from my high school and were in sororities at their respective colleges, and I couldn't help but want to be part of it. They looked so happy in their pictures with their "families" and with their sorority sisters, I couldn't help but notice, however, that almost no people of color were in those pictures.

I grew up in a predominantly white community and attended a predominantly white school district, so going to school at Villanova wasn't much of an adjustment in that aspect. In the fall semester, I met my three best friends, one of whom was one of my roommates, and we four became inseparable. We spent every day together, from eating meals to doing homework, but I felt that I needed to expand my circle. I started talking to more people in my learning community, and I joined the all-female women's choir and met some great girls there. However, by the end of the semester, I struggled to find a community where I truly "fit in."

As we were about to leave for winter break, all of the freshman girls on campus were asking each other, "Are you rushing?" I would always respond, "I'm considering it!" I checked out the social media of each of the sororities, and my main concern was that I could count the number of women of color in each sorority on one hand. Because of that, I briefly considered joining a multicultural sorority, but the fact that those sororities were identified by a certain race wasn't ideal for me. As a maker of impulsive decisions, I decided that I would just go through the formal Panhellenic recruitment process and see how it goes. My parents were in full support, but I don't think they really expected me to go through with my decision.

For those of you who don't know how Panhellenic recruitment works at Villanova, it's basically four days of talking to girls in all eight sororities on campus. On the first day, you talk to a few girls from four sororities, and then on the second day, you talk to girls from the other four sororities. After the second day, you rank your top sororities. On the third day, girls can attend up to five chapters' events and rank them, and on the last day, it's narrowed down to two. Throughout the whole process, all of the sororities use a mutual selection process where potential new members and the individual sororities are all making rankings.

I walked in on the first day into the grand ballroom and I probably saw around 10 women of color. I shouldn't have been surprised, but it was crazy to see in person. I brushed it off, and I went into each round as my most authentic self. However, when I was called back to only two chapters on the third day after talking to all of the sororities, I became self-conscious. Was it because of how I dressed? Was it because of how I looked? I reminded myself that these chapters were actually interested in me and that I should make the most of these rounds. They were both chapters that I really wanted to be in, so after this, it was a matter of which one showed more of an interest in me.

On the last day, I was only called back to one chapter, so if I ended up getting a bid from that chapter, it would be no surprise which chapter it would be. In that last round, I had some extremely genuine conversations with girls in the sorority. I talked about the weirdest aspects about myself that I didn't tell girls in any other sorority, and I clicked with pretty much all of the girls I talked to.

When I talked to them, it didn't matter that I looked different than everyone else, it mattered that I was me.

After I received a bid (i.e. an invitation) from that sorority, I was ecstatic. I will admit that I thought I would transform into this new person, but throughout my first weeks in the sorority, I felt like pretty much exactly the same person I was when I came in. And that's one thing I loved about my sorority—the people around me caused me to be the best version of myself, not a new version of myself. It helped that our campus doesn't have university-sponsored houses, because Greek life at schools that do becomes very prevalent and invasive on campus.

I want to make it clear that I'm not saying I've come to neglect my background. I have by no means forgotten about my Asian heritage; my race just isn't something I'm treated differently for. In the cover photo for this article, it's obvious that I'm one of two women of color in my pledge class of 35, but the sense of community I've found trumps the fact that my race is a physical differentiator. An example of this is my sorority "family": me, my big, gbig, and ggbig. It sounds silly to say, but in a normal family, it would turn heads to have one Asian person in a fully Caucasian family, but it makes no difference in this one.

Katelyn Tsai

To some, it may seem like I'm making a bigger deal than I should be about being Asian in a Panhellenic sorority, but as a woman of color, race impacts most aspects of my life. In the classroom and in the workplace, we are often the only person who looks like us in the room, and we are treated differently for it. I've been asked by a white teacher in class, "What do you think about this from your experience?" Naturally, being part of the majority, a white person probably wouldn't be asked such a question, but it's important to be empathetic when speaking to people of color.

I can't ensure that all women of color choosing to go through with Panhellenic recruitment will have the same experience I did. For all I know, my success story could have been an exception to what women of color normally experience. I do want to emphasize that the reason I was able to gain so many more great people and experiences in my life was because I took the initial risk—I didn't think about the possible consequences that could result from rushing; I just did it before I could doubt myself. Often, women of color experience imposter syndrome, where we experience self-doubt about our accomplishments, and I didn't want that to impact my ultimate decision to rush.

To my fellow women of color: we are powerful in our own right, and any sorority would be lucky to have our diverse backgrounds and experiences.

And if other friends who are people of color are questioning your decision to rush, it shouldn't matter, because everyone's paths in college are different. At the same time, don't completely immerse yourself into such a "white" community and lose yourself in the process. Find a way to strike the balance between the different groups of people you surround yourself with, and your college experience will be that much more fulfilling.

Related Content

Facebook Comments