I Went To The 'Game Of Thrones' Concert Experience And I Am Still Not Over It.

I Went To The 'Game Of Thrones' Concert Experience And I Am Still Not Over It.

Contains spoilers for 'Game of Thrones.'

It's no secret that my favorite genre of music is instrumental soundtrack music (in fact I've actually written about some of my favorites that you can find here) and the Game of Thrones soundtrack just has a signature sound to it that anytime I listen to it, I feel like I could be a Queen...no wait not a Queen, a Khaleesi. The music combined with the emotional roller coaster that is the show is just euphonious (yes I am using that big SAT word to make myself sound smart).

Last November, I had been playing around online and stumbled across this video about a concert tour that would be conducted by Ramin Djawadi (the composer of Game of Thrones soundtrack) and was just going to be about the music of Game of Thrones.

After watching the video and discovering that the tour was actually going to be playing near where I lived, I was ecstatic as I put in the request for tickets in the nose bleeds straight onto my Christmas list. And I actually got them (thank you again Nana and Poppi)! From then on, it had been something I was looking very much forward to for 2017.

This week I got to finally use my tickets and attend "The Game of Thrones Concert Experience". Needless to say it did not at all disappoint and actually turned out to be one of the best concerts I've ever been to. I am sure some people are wondering how a plain orchestra concert could possibly be so exciting, but trust me it was borderline adrenaline pumping.

Upon arrival, the stadium had a line going out of the building, letting me know that I wasn't the only nerd excited about this event. In fact a supposed 17,000 people had attended that evening. The stage was absolutely ginormous, even from our seat in the almost back row my Nana and I knew that this was going to be a memorable event about our shared favorite show.

However, it had seemed that there were too many people in the back seats with us and not enough on the ground floor. That was when ushers started giving floor seats to everyone behind us to go do down. I wasn't bothered though that they weren't approaching us, and I'm actually never bothered by far away seats, I was just happy to be there. Finally though the band started to warm up and I was a bit excited (note the shaky camera in the GIF below due to the fact I was vibrating with excitment)

Once the concert had started they opened with the main title for the show and it sounded perfect, with the only downside of people still making their way to their seats. This meant that for the first two songs I had to keep dodging around peoples elbows to get a glance of what was going on (side note to any theater going people: Always get there early if you can). Luckily after people had settled down we were able to watch the show in all it's glory.

Everything flowed seamlessly and it really was an experience. As the music played the screens would coordinate with the scenes the music came from along with other bonuses to make things even more atmospheric. For example, when they played the music from the battle in the episode "Watchers on the Wall" snow began to fall from the stage and I could've sworn the stadium became colder.


Honestly the whole time my arms were pretty much covered in goosebumps and my Nana admitted that she got a bit teary eyed at one point. Things only got better from there though.

The show did in fact have an intermission and it turns out that they were still trying to give away floor seats and....we got chosen! Of course we took the opportunity to be even closer to the magic and I may have had a little fangirl asthma attack once we reached our seats.


You can tell there was a total difference in the seating.

The second act was even better than the first as they began to go over more emotional scenes and even added more effects. By more effects I mean straight up dragon fire as they played through the "Dance of Dragons", we actually were able to feel the heat from our seats. Everything was so spectacular that I really couldn't get myself to try and video tape some of the song to share with people, mainly because it would distract me from everything and I was having to much fun!

One of the really fun parts of show though was the audience and their shouting. I honestly thought I was the only one who shouted at the TV when I watched this show, but this proved me wrong. I have been to shows hoping for the crowd to participate and get excited that were not as passionate as this crowd. The best example I can give happened during the "Battle of the Bastards" portion of the concert.

The shouting really started up once the screens started a very certain scene that I'm sure had lots of people shouting.

The whole crowd started shouting things like "ZIG ZAG RICKON!" "YOU CAN MAKE IT RICKON" "ZIG ZAG DAMN IT!" "GET HIM JON" "F**K YOU RAMSAY". It was absolutely hilarious and also therapeutic because it's a pretty sad scene so we all got to get our emotional shouting out.

Honestly I could've just sat there at all night long and had them play through every episode. It was such a fun experience that I hope it happens every year till the show ends because I want to go see it again and again. If you are a huge Game of Thrones fan like me and absolutley love the show, you have to see this while it's on tour because I could not stop smiling and I hope every fan gets to experience what I felt that night. To end this article on an even happier note, here is a GIF if Ramin himself jamming on the guitar to "The Bear and the Maiden Fair".

Cover Image Credit: Art2Click

Your Wait time At Theme Parks Is Not Unfair, You're Just Impatient

Your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself.

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Toy Story Land at Disney's Hollywood Studios "unboxed" on June 30, 2018. My friend and I decided to brave the crowds on opening day. We got to the park around 7 AM only to find out that the park opened around 6 AM. Upon some more scrolling through multiple Disney Annual Passholder Facebook groups, we discovered that people were waiting outside the park as early as 1 AM.

We knew we'd be waiting in line for the bulk of the Toy Story Land unboxing day. There were four main lines in the new land: the line to enter the land; the line for Slinky Dog Dash, the new roller coaster; the line for Alien Spinning Saucers, the easier of the new rides in the land; Toy Story Mania, the (now old news) arcade-type ride; and the new quick-service restaurant, Woody's Lunchbox (complete with grilled cheese and "grown-up drinks").

Because we were so early, we did not have to wait in line to get into the land. We decided to ride Alien Spinning Saucers first. The posted wait time was 150 minutes, but my friend timed the line and we only waited for 50 minutes. Next, we tried to find the line for Slinky Dog Dash. After receiving conflicting answers, the runaround, and even an, "I don't know, good luck," from multiple Cast Members, we exited the land to find the beginning of the Slinky line. We were then told that there was only one line to enter the park that eventually broke off into the Slinky line. We were not about to wait to get back into the area we just left, so we got a Fastpass for Toy Story Mania that we didn't plan on using in order to be let into the land sooner. We still had to wait for our time, so we decided to get the exclusive Little Green Man alien popcorn bin—this took an entire hour. We then used our Fastpass to enter the land, found the Slinky line, and proceeded to wait for two and a half hours only for the ride to shut down due to rain. But we've come this far and rain was not about to stop us. We waited an hour, still in line and under a covered area, for the rain to stop. Then, we waited another hour and a half to get on the ride from there once it reopened (mainly because they prioritized people who missed their Fastpass time due to the rain). After that, we used the mobile order feature on the My Disney Experience app to skip part of the line at Woody's Lunchbox.

Did you know that there is actually a psychological science to waiting? In the hospitality industry, this science is the difference between "perceived wait" and "actual wait." A perceived wait is how long you feel like you are waiting, while the actual wait is, of course, the real and factual time you wait. There are eight things that affect the perceived wait time: unoccupied time feels longer than occupied time, pre-process waits feel longer than in-process waits, anxiety makes waits feel longer, uncertain waits are longer than certain waits, unexplained waits are longer than explained waits, unfair waits are longer than equitable waits, people will wait longer for more valuable service and solo waiting feels longer than group waiting.

Our perceived wait time for Alien Spinning Saucers was short because we expected it to be longer. Our wait for the popcorn seemed longer because it was unoccupied and unexplained. Our wait for the rain to stop so the ride could reopen seemed shorter because it was explained. Our wait between the ride reopening and getting on the coaster seemed longer because it felt unfair for Disney to let so many Fastpass holders through while more people waited through the rain. Our entire wait for Slinky Dog Dash seemed longer because we were not told the wait time in the beginning. Our wait for our food after placing a mobile order seemed shorter because it was an in-process wait. We also didn't mind wait long wait times for any of these experiences because they were new and we placed more value on them than other rides or restaurants at Disney. The people who arrived at 1 AM just added five hours to their perceived wait

Some non-theme park examples of this science of waiting in the hospitality industry would be waiting at a restaurant, movie theater, hotel, performance or even grocery store. When I went to see "Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom," the power went out in the theater right as we arrived. Not only did we have to wait for it to come back and for them to reset the projectors, I had to wait in a bit of anxiety because the power outage spooked me. It was only a 30-minute wait but felt so much longer. At the quick-service restaurant where I work, we track the time from when the guest places their order to the time they receive their food. Guests in the drive-thru will complain about 10 or more minute waits, when our screens tell us they have only been waiting four or five minutes. Their actual wait was the four or five minutes that we track because this is when they first request our service, but their perceived wait begins the moment they pull into the parking lot and join the line because this is when they begin interacting with our business. While in line, they are experiencing pre-process wait times; after placing the order, they experience in-process wait times.

Establishments in the hospitality industry do what they can to cut down on guests' wait times. For example, theme parks offer services like Disney's Fastpass or Universal's Express pass in order to cut down the time waiting in lines so guests have more time to buy food and merchandise. Stores like Target or Wal-Mart offer self-checkout to give guests that in-process wait time. Movie theaters allow you to check in and get tickets on a mobile app and some quick-service restaurants let you place mobile or online orders. So why do people still get so bent out of shape about being forced to wait?

On Toy Story Land unboxing day, I witnessed a woman make a small scene about being forced to wait to exit the new land. Cast Members were regulating the flow of traffic in and out of the land due to the large crowd and the line that was in place to enter the land. Those exiting the land needed to wait while those entering moved forward from the line. Looking from the outside of the situation as I was, this all makes sense. However, the woman I saw may have felt that her wait was unfair or unexplained. She switched between her hands on her hips and her arms crossed, communicated with her body language that she was not happy. Her face was in a nasty scowl at those entering the land and the Cast Members in the area. She kept shaking her head at those in her group and when allowed to proceed out of the land, I could tell she was making snide comments about the wait.

At work, we sometimes run a double drive-thru in which team members with iPads will take orders outside and a sequencer will direct cars so that they stay in the correct order moving toward the window. In my experience as the sequencer, I will inform the drivers which car to follow, they will acknowledge me and then still proceed to dart in front of other cars just so they make it to the window maybe a whole minute sooner. Not only is this rude, but it puts this car and the cars around them at risk of receiving the wrong food because they are now out of order. We catch these instances more often than not, but it still adds stress and makes the other guests upset. Perhaps these guests feel like their wait is also unfair or unexplained, but if they look at the situation from the outside or from the restaurant's perspective, they would understand why they need to follow the blue Toyota.

The truth of the matter is that your perceived wait time is always going to be longer than your actual wait time if you can't take a minute to focus on something other than yourself. We all want instant gratification, I get it. But in reality, we have to wait for some things. It takes time to prepare a meal. It takes time to experience a ride at a theme park that everyone else wants to go on. It takes time to ring up groceries. It takes patience to live in this world.

So next time you find yourself waiting, take a minute to remember the difference between perceived and actual wait times. Think about the eight aspects of waiting that affect your perceived wait. Do what you can to realize why you are waiting or keep yourself occupied in this wait. Don't be impatient. That's no way to live your life.

Cover Image Credit:

Aranxa Esteve

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11 Thoughts You Have While Packing For a Road trip

5. How many pairs of underwear do I really need to bring?

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Packing for a road trip, or any vacation for that matter can be so overwhelming thinking of all of the things you need to bring and overthinking everything else in the world. Why do we get so stressed out over what we are going to bring? Hey, as long as you have your wallet and cellphone, everything else can be replaced.

1. Do I have everything?

The most commonly asked question when packing. In fact, you'll ask yourself this question a million times before you even walk out of the door.

2. Should I add more songs to my playlist?

Your headphones are definitely the second, if not the first thing you pack for a road trip. Next to your phone charger, of course. Your music for a car ride is so essential, and definitely what keeps you sane throughout the journey.

3. Am I really going to watch all of these movies?

Next to music, movies are SO important for a long car ride. You need something to distract you from the countless hours spent in the car. I always pack way too many movies to the point where I ask myself, "am I really going to watch all of these?"

4. Am I packing too much?

When you're wanting to travel light and fit everything into one bag, it can be overwhelming trying to fit everything. It makes you second guess whether or not you really need to pack those extra sandals.

5. How many pairs of underwear do I really need to bring?

Hey. What If. WHAT IF I just so happen to spill on myself or pee myself every single day when I'm there? Yes, I know I'm only going for a week but I'm definitely going to bring like eleven pairs of underwear. JUST IN CASE, OKAY?

6. Why the fuck am I packing so many socks?

I know I will literally wear sandals every single day but hey, again, just in case, I'm going to pack like six pairs of socks. You know, if I ever so happen to decide to take a run every morning. (LOL yeah, right.)

7. I will literally wear the same four outfits for a week, I guess i’ll bring all of these other clothes just to be safe

I know myself. I will wear the same few shorts with the same few shirts. But in case I'm feeling wild, maybe I'll wear this dress thats been in the back of my closet for a year. Yeah, why not?

8. Should I be making a list of everything I'm packing?

Or... should I just throw everything in my bag and pray I packed everything... & hope for the best?

9. Seriously though I might spill everyday so I definitely have to pack tons of extra outfits

What IF I spill on a pair of cute shorts, and then I won't have another outfit to match that corresponding shirt? I definitely should just pack my entire closet, tbh.

10. I hate packing

Wow I wish everything could just magically appear into my bag right now.

11. At least I'm not at work.

Yes.

I'm really not sure why we as a society always need to pack more than we know we'll wear. Hey, better having the clothes and not wearing them, then wanting them and not having them! Better safe than sorry! Here's to pleasant packing and to a great vacation!

Cover Image Credit:

Pexels

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