In the age of automation, reports are published routinely about how people are losing their jobs because the companies they work for decide to order robots to do their work at a lower long-term cost. This transition might be beneficial, considering how dangerous jobs like logging could be replaced with automated excavators, however different types of work would need to be created, which involves emotional intelligence and judgment, which are actions that machines cannot produce.

Since jobs are being replaced more frequently by robots, the importance of human labor is immediately called into question. An answer to that dilemma may be solved by adapting to this technologically advancing world, especially if people would need to learn as much trades as they can if their jobs will not last for decades. This type of solution would make sense considering how human beings will not be completely phased out and it might benefit not just the individual but also the rest of the business world and the government. Although automated services might be analogous to the automobile replacing stage-coaches, what happens when there are problems that plague these new income streams that can do away months or even years of dedication?

Although Patreon provides a sustainable living for creative professions, that stream of income can be just as liable as any other "regular" job of becoming compromised. The types of purging should not raise the question of whether people agree or not with the content creator, rather whether their own livelihoods might also be susceptible to being purged. Until moderators can keep their own system in check, the content creators are left to deal with the negative consequences of working creatively.

If you sign up for any site and start a brand, you are immediately beholden to that site. Not just the Terms of Service, but to any bad actors who wish to abuse the system in order to spite you and deprive you of your livelihood. In the YouTube world, it has become characteristic for popular influencers to be affected by fraudulent DMCA strikes--or "false flags"--and have their activities compromised. This type of predicament does not help when the moderations of the site are automated and cannot understand context, so a misunderstanding might be responded with such swiftness that leaves all the other content creators feeling ill-at-ease when producing content.

Perhaps this removal of context might not be a risky problem if it is understood by people inside and outside of the niche. When I try to put a brand on the internet, I do it in such a way that I can be able to show it to anyone, whether they are my family members, my professors, basically anybody whether it is a familiar, professional, or academic environment. As a result, I try my best to write material that I am not embarrassed by, or at the very least write material that is as convincingly well that anyone might be won over.

I also find it important to not put all of one's eggs in one basket. Even if a site moderates their content with a team of Constitutional lawyers (or at least people who are proficient in Constitutional law), the risk is still present for the purging of your content and livelihood. A solution to living in a time like 2019 would need to be in a constant state of education and career-searching. Considering the advent of MOOC sites like Udacity, Udemy, and EdX, this technological advance would be beneficial in that sense in that it helps people to adapt to it.