10 Essential Lists For Busy College Students

10 Essential Lists For Busy College Students

I promise, organization can be fun.

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I love lists. There is something about seeing your entire day written out on paper that can make even the most stressful things seem doable. I keep lists with me wherever I go, as well as a pen and paper in case I need to make more. They keep me organized and sane when I have a lot that I need to do or remember, especially during particularly stressful times, such as exams.

It is very easy to forget things in today's day and age, where everything is rushed and seems like they need to be handled immediately, and lists are a good way to lay out what exactly needs to be prioritized and what can wait.

1. Daily to-do lists

Every night, I try to make a to-do list for myself for the next day. Usually, I try to condense it down to a post-it note, but occasionally I will need a bigger piece of paper. I carry this list around with me all day and usually stick it somewhere in my planner so I can always add to it as the day goes on or cross things off as I complete them.

2. Weekly to-do lists

On Mondays, I make my weekly to-do list, which normally comprises of assignments for school or deadlines for work. This is where I schedule when I will sit down and get assignments done, so I do not have to worry about forgetting one. In the margins, I will list smaller tasks that I have to do either before working on an assignment or that have a less harsh deadline.

3. Running shopping lists

I keep one list in my bag of things that I need to pick up from the store, so if I find myself with a few minutes to spare or out shopping for something else, I will be able to get these essential items and not forget what I need.

4. Gratitude lists

It always helps to take a moment and reflect on things that we are grateful for, especially because there is so much college students have that we tend to take for granted. Things like our education are often forgotten about because we are too caught up in how stressful school can be and do not take time to be happy that we are able to improve our minds in the first place.

5. List of upcoming events

This list is usually for the month or the next few months. I will list all of the birthdays I need to remember and get presents for, days where I will need to go back home, or any plans that I have made that I do not want to double book myself for. (PS, this picture is a lie, there are no naughty pups.)

6. Chapters covered in each class

I don't know if this is a computer science thing, or if a lot of subjects have this, but almost all of my classes that have textbooks will skip around with the chapters. In one class, we have covered chapters one through 10, but last week we were going over chapter three. Therefore, I keep a running list of what chapters we have covered in each of my classes to make studying for quizzes easier and make finding answers to questions more simple when I refer to the textbook.

7. Article ideas

I am a writer, so this should come as no surprise. At any given time I will have about 10 ideas on a sticky note on my computer (my one digital list). Between my platforms, this will last about a week or two, so it's constantly being updated with new ideas I've had or current events I've found interesting. This is helpful to non-writers as well in case they need to provide a writing sample for something.

8. Bucket list

Even though I am not planning an ending just yet, I do have a list of things I want to do. I usually compose one for each year, but I do have a larger list of things I want to do before I die. I suppose these are kind of like resolutions, but they do not require a daily commitment.

9. Books to read

I am guilty of not keeping up with my TBR, or To Be Read List. I get too excited about new books that I often forget that there were many before it in the TBR priority list.

10. Movies and TV shows to watch 

Similar to books, there are always new movies and TV shows coming out, and as they do, I add them to my list. I try to watch one feel-good show and one serious TV show at a time so I don't get plot points confused and can watch what I feel like based on my mood.

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Why I Can't Support Jeffree Star

I used to idolize him, but his racism and misogyny have crossed the line.
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Like any other person obsessed with makeup, I follow many different makeup artists on YouTube and Instagram. I love watching their tutorials and reviews, all which leave me inspired to try new looks and teach me more about products that will up my makeup game. One of these beauty gurus that I used to follow is Jeffree Star, a singer/songwriter, model, and makeup artist who is probably best known for his popular makeup line, Jeffree Star Cosmetics, which features liquid lipsticks, lip scrubs, highlighters, and a new eyeshadow palette.

However, as of late, his cosmetic line isn’t the only thing making him a hot topic on social media; his extensive history of making racist comments has now become the subject of many YouTube videos by other vloggers and beauty gurus. One of the most disturbing incidents is a video he made ten years ago on MySpace. The video is supposed to be a satirical skit between him and a drag queen, who is in blackface. One of the disgusting comments made in the video is that he wants to throw battery acid on an African American woman to lighten her skin so it will match her foundation. Star also calls someone a “black b*tch” while his friend continues to pretend to be a stereotypical black woman. Even if the video was made ten years ago, he was still an adult at the time and should have known better than to make something so vile and racist. If he had been 15 years-old, that’s one thing. But he was at least 19 years-old at the time; there are no excuses.

TW: racism, racial slurs


Star has become infamous also for being a drama queen on social media, whether to be rude to fans complaining about his products or starting Twitter wars with other makeup artists. While most people know about his beef with Kylie Jenner over some defects with her liquid lipsticks, Star’s issues go far beyond just her. One feud that highlights his misogynistic and racist behavior is with MakeupShayla, another makeup artist. At an event they both attended, in his Snapchat story Star ranted that Shayla allegedly told another YouTouber that her face was disproportionate and to get lip fillers. Whether or not this was actually said in a rude manner, like he claims, is unknown. He then proceeded to rage about her being a c*nt and a h*e. Even though that comment had sent him in such a rage, Shayla said in her Snapchat story that he was all smiles when they ran into each other at the event.

On Twitter, the situation became even more intense. He called her out first for making the lip filler comment; if she had indeed said something rude like that, then confronting her about it is fine. However, he escalated things to a terrifying level. He threatened to beat her up several times, and when she criticized his fans for supporting someone who threatens violence against a woman, Star responded that she looks like man. I find it very ironic that he would claim that she was a bully, yet threaten her and hurl terrible insults at her. Shayla should not have made the rude comment about that woman needing lip fillers; however, she does not deserve to be threatened or insulted in this manner, especially since Star was too much of a coward to say anything to her face.

Moreover, despite his claims to be so against bullying, and to be such a supporter of female empowerment, he is friends with a bully. In one of his Snapchat stories, MannyMUA and the owner of Gerard Cosmetics made fun of a YouTuber who was reviewing the company’s products. In the last part of the Snapchats, the owner said that the reviewer was an ugly person. Manny later tried to apologize and say that the video cut off and that the owner was saying she had an ugly personality, but that’s not exactly better. Despite this incident, Jeffree and Manny are still the best of friends, and Manny was never beat up by Star for being rude. Moreover, it seems as though Star has a way of corrupting beauty gurus who become a part of his inner circle. When Manny was primarily friends with Patrick Starr, another makeup artist, he was kinder and he wasn’t rude. But once Star came into the picture, Manny became his carbon-copy: another gay boy acting like a stereotypical black woman and covering up his rudeness by calling it “sass” and “shade.” Plus, it is shocking to me that Manny, a person of color, would still adore Star despite his racist history. I feel guilty now for talking about him in my last piece about makeup double standards.

Stephanie Nicole, a makeup artist on YouTube, made a video reviewing a few of Star’s products. Then, once she’s finished the review, she then goes on to discuss Star’s racist and misogynistic tendencies, showing videos of his Snapchat rant against MakeupShayla, his disturbing skit, and other instances where he was rude to fans and problematic in general. She concludes that she refuses to support his company anymore. I agree with her completely. Just because he is a part of a minority group by being queer does not give him the right to be racist or misogynistic. You can watch the entire video down below:

I was extremely conflicted when I heard about all of this. In fact, I was almost heartbroken; I have admired Star for a long time because of how he breaks gender roles and goes against the gender binary. I also coveted his products, and was very ready to purchase his Skin Frost highlighters and some liquid lipsticks up until I found out that he’s a racist. I have some of his music on my iTunes because some of his tracks are fun for workouts, but now I feel guilty even though I just did not know. However, I do know that I will not be supporting Jeffree Star anymore, no matter how tempting his products are.

If you still want to buy his cosmetics, go ahead, I can’t stop you. I have no right to tell you how to spend your money. I don’t blame you; he produces some great makeup after all, even though he is a trashy person. However, if you bought his products before finding out about his problematic behavior, and now regret your purchases, I advise that next time you research a company before giving them your money. It’s difficult to enjoy a product when you know it’s produced by an unpleasant person. This experience has taught me a valuable lesson about being an informed consumer and not simply buying something because it has pretty packaging.

Cover Image Credit: YouTube

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It’s Time To Stop Letting Victoria’s Secret Define What Is Beautiful

Glorifying and commodifying a specific type of body on a large-scale is damaging to women everywhere.

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Victoria's Secret is a retailer that thrives off of exclusion and maintains notions of beauty and attractiveness that are no longer as welcomed in the 21st century.

Frankly, capitalism will likely wipe out the brand when people stop buying their lingerie due to lack of support for the company.

That's the beauty of capitalism.

In fact, VS stock, which is now down 40% indicates that this type of change is coming to the lingerie marketplace, where women now value companies that promote bodily diversity and don't shame certain kinds of bodies for not adhering to the beauty standard set by Victoria's Secret.

While Victoria's Secret has increased its diversity throughout the years regarding ethnic backgrounds, the body type represented in the brand is incredibly homogenous.

The models in the show are all runway models outside of the Victoria's Secret show, meaning that they adhere to standard agency requirements. These requirements dictate a female model be at least 5'8 in height, and while weight is not often specified, models are usually between 105-120 pounds.

Any brief exploration into the models on the site will show that their measurements are around 31-34 inches in the bust, with a 22-26 inch waist and 34-36 inch hips. These measurements correspond to sizes 0-2, which are often used as sample sizes for the runway.

This article is not meant to attack their signature model, "Angels." They are beautiful women who fit the needs of the fashion industry they earn a living in. However, they are not the ONLY type of beautiful women to exist.

Further, this article is not meant to denigrate naturally thin individuals. I am a size 0 myself, so many people consider me a "thin" individual.

People might fail to understand why I disapprove of Victoria's Secret as a brand. After all, they cater to individuals with my body type, so what is there for me to complain about?

I don't fit their height requirement, meaning that I could never be one of their esteemed Angels. And you could ask yourself, "so why does that matter?"

The vast majority of women in the United States could never come close to achieving the bodily standards observed in Victoria's Angels that the brand emphasizes.

And which it's important for companies to cater to individual markets to ensure corporate diversity, Victoria's Secret remains a lingerie giant and has a massive ability in dictating national standards of beauty.

They also sell sizes beyond the XS or S displayed in the fashion show, yet fail to include bodies in the show that would fit their M, L, or XL sizes they sell in stores.

The problem with influence and lack representation coupled with their marketing strategy dictates to women that the Angel is the pinnacle of beauty. Therefore by wearing their lingerie, you get to supposedly feel like an Angel in the Victoria's Secret fantasy.

And yet, you don't.

Why?

Because even if you get sucked into their marketing scheme and buy their bras and underwear expecting to feel better about yourself, if you're not absolutely secure and completely love with your body already, you'll just recognize that you will never fit the Angel standard that you feel is expected of you to be considered beautiful.

And that when you look in the mirror, you not looking like an Angel makes you feel like a fraud.

Victoria's Secret further utilizes the term "sexy" often, meaning that wearing their lingerie is supposed to make you attractive and appealing to the opposite sex.

So not only is their brand about idealizing specific types of bodies but commodifying these particular bodies as objects of prime attractiveness to the opposite sex.

There is a consequence of presenting one body type as the most beautiful and categorizing it as incredibly sexy. For women, they risk feeling that a guy seeing them in lingerie will think of them as unattractive since they don't adhere to the epitomized beauty standard so endlessly praised in the media.

Victoria's Secret emphasizes that their show is a "fantasy." This notion of a fantasy can imply that it's not real. However, we as consumers know those models are still real people. And even if they're bronzed, made-up and thrust out onto the runway in perfect lighting, the bodies walking that runway wouldn't be there if Victoria's Secret didn't already consider them perfect before the show.

Further, Ed Razek, the Chief Marketing Officer of Creative Services of L Brands (the company that owns Victoria's Secret) responded to a question concerning bodily diversity in this manner:

"We attempted to do a television special for plus sizes (in 2000). No one had any interest in it, still don't,"

His quote is prime evidence that the minds behind Victoria's Secret do not consider bodies outside their norms interesting, nor beautiful enough to be in the spotlight.

In the eyes of Victoria's Secret, we women who don't fit the Angel model are not valued. We are not, and never will be, as attractive or as sexy since we are not, and cannot become, Angels.


To them, we are just women who chase their notions of beauty and sexiness to try and fulfill our desires to feel that way about ourselves. We remain consumers thinking that someday, maybe we will get close to or achieve that ideal and that wearing their lingerie is somehow a way to get there.

And since the vast majority of women in the United States feel insecure about their bodies, Victoria's Secret capitalizes on women's insecurities.

Brands such as ThirdLove and Savage X Fenty have made efforts to turn lingerie from devices of body standards and external validation to objects worn by women of all backgrounds for support, self-confidence, and comfortability. They've also worked to move the notion of sexiness away from something determined by the opposite sex to instead a feeling one experiences from empowering their own female sexuality.

All in all, you get to decide what companies you support, where to put your money and who you think makes the nicest lingerie.

I, along with many other women, have decided I don't want to spend my money at Victoria's Secret anymore. I've been on too long of a journey of bodily hate and self-destruction, and I feel that it is time for me to move on and surround myself in a social movement that doesn't make me feel less of a woman.

Maybe one day, Victoria's Secret will do someone to cater to the millions of women upturning their noses at their company. And if not, they may have to settle as a smaller, specialty retailer that emphasizes clothing for smaller women.

Regardless, a change in marketing could benefit their sales and stock.

Otherwise, a lot of us women are going to go elsewhere and work to redefine what it means to be beautiful.

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