Education Let Me Understand The Trump's Latest Address, Giving Me Confidence.

Education Is Why I Understood Trump's Oval Office Address And Can Confidently Have An Informed Opinion

In the past, my education has not been my utmost priority, but I realized its importance when President Trump gave his Oval Office Address. I realized the impact his decision — or lack of one — would have on the country.

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Donald Trump recently addressed the partial government shutdown of nonessential departments. He did this because he wants a wall along the southern border to prevent illegal immigrants from coming into the U.S. Congress did not include funding for the wall in the federal budget. Democrats believe the wall would be a waste of taxpayers' money, that it is a fear tactic and insufficient. I understood all this not just because I know English but because my education so far (an unfinished high school degree) has allowed me to analyze the topics they discuss and compare it to the history that has impacted these decisions.

In analyzing the two responses, I was able to connect the discussion to the effects this may have on my family's life and the surrounding world. I've come to the realization how important being educated is because without it, I would not understand the nuances of these discussions that were provided or even the discussions my family members were having with each other.

Language Arts teachings on rhetoric allowed me to understand the president's audience, WHAT ABOUT THEM? what did you understand about them?

his supporters of the general public, his purpose, to gain more support for the wall to keep out illegal immigrants along the Southern Border, and the context of this itself, that we currently live in a highly divided society that will cause much more pain.

SPLIT THE ABOVE INTO DIFFERENT SENTENCES. THAT'S A LOT OF "I UNDERSTAND THIS BUT I WONT TELL YOU HOW" RIGHT NOW. TELL US WHAT YOU UNDERSTAND. critical thinking.

The skills given to me through this class allowed me to develop my own opinion on the subject.

U.S. government provides me with the information to, in some effect, navigate the dynamics of checks and balances between Congress and the president. Okay, what does that have to do with Trump's speech? Was there any point where you were like, oh he/congress can or can't do that because of checks and balances??

US History presented me the history of former parties and the country's ideals that shape the political parties of today. what examples of this are highlighted in the speech. would be good to mention how first president Washington said political parties would divide america, similar to how each side, dems and repubs are butting heads about solutions rather than working to meet in the middle, they're both stubbornly sticking to black and white, yes or no, to the wall and other policies.

While history and my language studies provided me with better comprehension of President Trump's address, the use of statistics by him, like...? what stats did he use? are they accurate? do you know how/where to check for accuracy of facts?

the press following, what do you mean by this?

and the governors against him came from my math studies helping me evaluate how much of the population would actually be affected by the problems mentioned by both. again how? what population problems were mentioned that you realize would be affected? or what weren't mentioned that you realize would be affected?

In the end without an education I probably wouldn't have been able to understand what the President, the Democrats, or news reporters had mentioned or the implications of either sides arguments if they are to play through. My education allowed me to see the fallacies in each argument, the suggestive tone of the speakers, and the symbolic resolutions of each action made so far. In order to make informed decisions an individual should not only have trusted sources, but have confidence in their opinions as well. The President, his supporters, his adversaries all have confidence in their beliefs and know that what they say is truth. And in order for one to have confidence they have to have facts. Whether they're real or unreal is determined by the audience.

Perception is our reality, but an education allows us to see it just a bit more clearly.

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Bethel Church's Gay Conversion Program Is A Huge Problem And We're Not Talking Enough About It

Religion doesn't give us a right to purposefully abuse a community.

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About a year ago, in May of 2018, Bethel Church in Redding, California came out publicly against a set of proposed laws which would make it illegal for a licensed mental health professional to perform 'conversion therapy' in order to change the sexual orientation or same-sex attractions of a person. The head pastor of the church asked for members of Bethel Church to act against the three bills (California AB 1779, AB 2943 and AB 2119), urging them to contact their congressmen and ask for them to prevent the laws from passing, all in order for them to continue their harmful ex-gay ministry.

Today, Bethel Church is under scrutiny for the role out of their ex-gay conversion initiative, CHANGED. The website of the initiative movement claims that any change is possible through Jesus, and encourages those who identify as LGBTQ+ to abandon the "pain, rejection, and despair," of being LGBTQ+. (CHANGED website). This movement is not the first, but just the next in a long line of organizations claiming to provide change for those who identify as LGBTQ+, despite this being an impossibility. Ex-gay programs, in actuality, only serve to push those who go through them farther away from the love of God.

Conversion therapy for LGBTQ+ people has been proven not only to be completely ineffective but has also been found to cause intense mental issues and in many cases, a strong correlation to suicide. Those who have gone through ex-gay therapy programs such as Exodus International or Focus on the Family's Love Won Out have admitted that even after successfully completing the program they had not experienced a change in their same-sex attraction. The founder of Exodus International even claimed that by his estimation, 99.9% of those who had gone through his organization's therapy had not experienced any change in their orientation. Exodus International was considered intensely controversial, and their methods considered by most, if not all, mental health professionals to be incredibly damaging. Those who come out of conversion therapy experience intense feelings of depression and often experience a lack of self-worth.

As a Christian, I grieve every single time someone claiming to believe what I do comes out and condemns the LGBT community. It hurts to see one community I am a member of being hateful towards another community I am just as proud to be a part of. This news stung a little harder because I for a long time have loved Bethel Church's worship band. Their songs have spoken to me in ways I cannot fully describe, helping to bring me closer to the God I believe in. A God who I can say for certain would never advocate for something as damaging and destructive as conversion therapy. The same Jesus who Bethel's songs worship is the same Jesus who calls us to love everyone. Bethel Church is not following this call, and it is important that we speak out against conversion therapy, and not allow our fellow brothers and sisters in Christ to carry out such a harmful program.

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Keeping A Journal Handy Keeps Me From Forgetting My Eventful Past

Also, it's genuinely the best way to get out pent up emotions.

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Time is flying by so quickly, and it's so difficult to keep track of every little event I'm a part of. At the same time, though, I find myself sitting at my desk wide awake every Saturday at midnight just writing in a journal about the past week.

Who did I see? How did I feel? What did I accomplish?

Even the most minute of details becomes the most important topic in the world, and I find myself enthralled in memories now immortalized in a notebook. The moment in which I'm writing as much as I can remember is peaceful, and I think that I am most at home when it's the middle of the night and no one can disturb the flow of thoughts.

After all, the purpose of having a journal is to expose one's future to reminders of the past otherwise unforgotten. One of my essays from eighth grade is wedged between two pages in an older book of mine, and when I stumbled upon it just a few weeks ago, I spent the next hour dissecting every little feeling I could remember from the time when I wrote that piece.

There's something amazing about having a journal to presently write in and eventually look back upon with open ears and listening eyes. There's something magical about being able to recount the tirade of feelings I experienced three, four years ago even now. It's as if I've envisioned a pathway to walk down (some would call "Memory Lane"), and I can find myself walking down that road at any given time.

In freshman year, I would spend an hour every day of the weekend just writing. About anything and everything that came to mind, only as long as the pen I was holding wasn't lifting itself off the paper. The amount of vivid description I put into every nit-picky part of my day was astonishing to read. I didn't want to forget anything, and I thought I could avoid forgetting by telling my future self what I knew.

Recollecting plain information, whether it be facts and figures or charts and data, can seem mundane, something one is unable to relate to and therefore "care" about, but recollecting emotions is putting on those same shoes one wore in a previous time and revisiting a slew of old memories.

It's embarrassing sometimes to find little mistakes in my writing or little places in which I attempted to sound profound but ended up sounding paranoid, but that characterized who I was as a writer back then (and maybe even today). Because I have journals full of pages and pages of sketches and words and feelings, I know who I used to be. I can remember who I was two years ago because of a journal entry from January 2017.

There was a day in sophomore year when I realized that high school was meant to be stressful, not a carefree adventure. I wrote down everything I felt that day, down to the sound of the bell ending the school day. And when I sat there a month ago and reread everything I had poured out, I laughed to myself, thinking that this rude awakening I had been ranting about was just the beginning.

It's comical and heartbreaking at the same time to sit through a journal written so long ago, but I think it's all worth it. The weeks are counting down as this school year is coming to a close, and while I spend all my time ranting aloud about how stressed I am, my true emotions only show up on the pages of my journal. Safe to say, I feel more at peace knowing that there's someone in the future going through this journey with me.

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