I have been reading "real" books, as inbound paper with typed words on it, since I was a toddler and my grandmother first taught me how to read. When eBooks became the newest reading trend in the early 2010s, I was convinced that I would never give up my print books for a digital copy because it just wouldn't feel like reading.

Even now, I can't deny that there is something about holding a book in my hands, smelling that "old book" smell (yes, I am one of those crazy people that like to sniff their books), and physically turning the pages that feel more authentic than tapping on my phone.

However, there are some serious benefits to owning different books in different formats. I like to keep bigger books, such as "The Shadowhunter Chronicles" and textbooks in eBook form so it is easier to bring them wherever I need them, and audiobooks are great for light-hearted biographies that I can listen to while I'm in the car or on the train. Not to mention, these newer formats allow me to collect many more books than I have physical space for in my home or dorm room, and I can carry them all with me anywhere.

Of course, I still have plenty of my books in paperback and hardcover, but now I like to choose the format I get my books based on what is most efficient. During the semester, I tend to get most of my books as eBooks so I can bring them back and forth from school to home easily or audiobooks so I can listen to them during the ride. Having multiple formats also makes it easier to read multiple books at once without getting the plots mixed up and helps you delegate time to each book.

For example, you can listen to your audiobook on the commute to class, read from your eBook while you wait for class to start or during downtime, and read your physical book at home before you go to sleep. The newer formats are more portable, because no one goes anywhere without their devices, and instead of spending another couple of hours scrolling through Instagram, you can study or read some of your books without having to lug around a physical copy.