"Eat Pray Love" Can Change The Concept Of Your Journey

"Eat Pray Love" Can Change The Concept Of Your Journey

"If you are prepared most of all to face and forgive some of the most difficult realities about yourself, then the truth will not be withheld from you" - Elizabeth Gilbert
185
views

Since being in Scotland, I have already learned so many things and have been so grateful that I took this risk. I feel it could be the best independent decision I have ever made.

But, I wasn't sure what my purpose of doing this adventure was. I was unsure how to feel, what to take in, and what to write down so I can remember forever. I didn't know how many times to eat out, what to cook, what my budget should be, or how I should react and interact with different cultures...seems like a lot of questions and uncertainty, right? That came from a girl who was pretty nervous about up and leaving the only thing I have really known.

My mindset has changed.

The second night being in Scotland, I had a long night of not sleeping, dealing with the time change. I stumbled upon the movie "Eat Pray Love" and had recognized the title as my mom used to love this movie. While I was watching the film, I became inspired by Elizabeth and her drive to change her life — to do something for her.

"Eat Pray Love," you helped give me true inspiration.

"In the end, I've come to believe in something I call the 'physics of the quest', a force in nature governed by the laws of gravity. The rules of quest physics goes something like this: If you're brave enough to leave behind everything familiar and comforting and set out on a truth-seeking journey either internally or externally, and if you are truly willing to regard everything that happens to you on that journey as a clue and if you accept everyone you meet along the way as a teacher and if you are prepared most of all to face and forgive some of the most difficult realities about yourself, then the truth will not be withheld from you" — Elizabeth Gilbert, "Eat Pray Love"

This quote stuck with me.

After the movie, I looked it up to re-read it, to internally understand the meaning. I fell in love with these words. I was so happy that I found a quote that truly had all of the story and meaning that I want to search for — that I want to have within me.

She focused her adventure and travels on the people, how they speak, and the way their culture works. She wanted to dive in to the culture with open arms to understand and process.

I loved how much time she wanted to spend on food and eating and not caring about weight or not fitting into what her past norm was. She didn't want to give up opportunities or great resturants because she was scared to become someone she wasn't in the past.

I have taken the step to leave my loved ones and friends behind to go out on this truth-seeking journey. I have already met so many incredible people who have opened my eyes to so many different parts of the world I haven't seen before. The locals are amazing and I hope to bring their friendliness and charisma back to the United States. They want everyone to love their city as much as they do.

This quote was such an incredible and eye-opening message for me and possibly for you as well. Whether you are traveling for a year, four months, or one week, you should always take it as a chance to change and grow.


Cover Image Credit: Pixabay via Pexels

Popular Right Now

I Visited The "Shameless" Houses And Here's Why You Shouldn't

Glamorizing a less-than-ideal way to live.
192539
views

After five hours of driving, hearing the GPS say, "Turn right onto South Homan Avenue" was a blessing.

My eyes peeled to the side of the road, viciously looking for what I have been driving so long for, when finally, I see it: the house from "Shameless."

"Shameless" is a hit TV show produced by Showtime. It takes place in modern-day Southside, Chicago. The plot, while straying at times, largely revolves around the Gallagher family and their continual struggle with (extreme) poverty. While a majority of the show is filmed offsite in a studio in Los Angeles, many outside scenes are filmed in Southside and the houses of the Gallagher's and side-characters are very much based on real houses.

We walked down the street, stopped in front of the two houses, took pictures and admired seeing the house in real life. It was a surreal experience and I felt out of place like I didn't belong there. As we prepared to leave (and see other spots from the show), a man came strolling down on his bicycle and asked how we were doing.

"Great! How are you?"

It fell silent as the man stopped in front of the Gallagher house, opened the gate, parked his bike and entered his home. We left a donation on his front porch, got back to the car and took off.

As we took the drive to downtown Chicago, something didn't sit right with me. While it was exciting to have this experience, I began to feel a sense of guilt or wrongdoing. After discussing it with my friends, I came to a sudden realization: No one should visit the "Gallagher" house.

The plot largely revolves the Gallagher family and their continual struggle with (extreme) poverty. It represents what Southside is like for so many residents. While TV shows always dramatize reality, I realized coming to this house was an exploitation of their conditions. It's entertaining to see Frank's shenanigans on TV, the emotional roller coasters characters endure and the outlandish things they have to do to survive. I didn't come here to help better their conditions, immerse myself in what their reality is or even for the donation I left: I came here for my entertainment.

Southside Chicago is notoriously dangerous. The thefts, murders and other crimes committed on the show are not a far-fetched fantasy for many of the residents, it's a brutal reality. It's a scary way to live. Besides the Milkovich home, all the houses typically seen by tourists are occupied by homeowners. It's not a corporation or a small museum, it's their actual property. I don't know how many visitors these homes get per day, week, month or year. Still, these homeowners have to see frequent visitors at any hour of the day, interfering with their lives. In my view, coming to their homes and taking pictures of them is a silent way of glamorizing the cycle of poverty. It's a silent way of saying we find joy in their almost unlivable conditions.

The conceit of the show is not the issue. TV shows have a way of romanticizing very negative things all the time. The issue at hand is that several visitors are privileged enough to live in a higher quality of life.

I myself experienced the desire and excitement to see the houses. I came for the experience but left with a lesson. I understand that tourism will continue to the homes of these individuals and I am aware that my grievances may not be shared with everyone, however, I think it's important to take a step back and think about if this were your life. Would you want hundreds, potentially thousands, of people coming to your house? Would you want people to find entertainment in your lifestyle, good and bad?

I understand the experience, excitement, and fun the trip can be. While I recommend skipping the houses altogether and just head downtown, it's most important to remember to be respectful to those very individuals whose lives have been affected so deeply by "Shameless."

Cover Image Credit: itsfilmedthere.com

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Day Four In Italy: Florence

This is the day we learned the history of everything

77
views

Waking up bright and early we first took the tour bus to the country side of Florence where we visited a medieval town full of shops that lined a beautiful countryside.


CountrysideBrooke Burney

We spent about three hours here just looking around, buying things, and taking pictures. Once the three hours were up, we went to a winery where they explained how they made wine with the grapes in their vineyard.


In the vineyardBrooke Burney

After the tour, they fed us lunch with some of their wine. Then, after we ate, we passed through their wine shop and took the bus back to the Piazza della Signoria. On the way back, our tour guide was telling us about Michelangelo and his time creating the Statue of David. We had to stand in a line for about thirty minutes but when our time came, we were thrilled. We entered and saw artwork from many different artists. However, Michelangelo had a hallway of his own that was mostly filled with unfinished sculptures of statues with David being at the very end.


Statue of DavidBrooke Burney

After the tour of the art museum, our tour guide took us to the square where the churches were and gave us a history lesson on them. He gave us a background on the pictures that were painted on the doors and what they represent.


Brooke Burney

After this tour, we went back to our hotel where we were able to go eat dinner. My friends and I went back to the small square we first went to and ate in a small pizza joint.


Italian pizzaBrooke Burney

If you ever go to Europe, keep in mind that they have a hard time splitting orders. As we were sitting at this table, we asked for separate checks but they made us pay separately on a single check, which was kind of funny watching three American girls pick through their euros.

After dinner, we went back to our hotel to pack for the next day. To the train station, then Pompeii!

Related Content

Facebook Comments