Do We Really Know The World Around Us?

Do We Really Know The World Around Us?

This is definitely what makes science an exploratory field.

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We, as humans, like to feel secure with the knowledge accumulated in bounds upon bounds of texts written in the past; but what about the texts yet to be written in the future? In his TED talk, Adam Savage talked about how science is not a contained box, as commonly believed, but an open field. Within that open field are fascinations that are either intentional or coincidental, which leads us to explore this field, wanting to know more about the world around us.

Not only can this pursuit of knowledge lead scientists to discover new species of animal, but entirely new species; such as the example of Canadian scientists discovering a hemimastigote, a new species of microorganisms that belong in their own kingdom separate from animals and plants. Though this discovery was not happened upon by the simple pondering, rather by a simple hike in Nova Scotia. In this way, it can easily relate to Eratosthenes calculating the Earth's circumference from seeing a reflection of the eclipse from the bottom of a well; and physicist Richard Fineman discovering the movement of sub-atomic particles after being inspired by a childhood conversation with his father about why the ball moved to the back of his little wagon to lead a life dedicated to science.

It is a never-ending pursuit that was always present, just as much as the hemimastigote was previously studied in the 19th century, but never placed in an evolutionary tree. A discovery does not have to be a completely new phenomenon, rather it can be further research into any topic that was neglected.

Just like the hemimastigote, a lot of rarely explored areas are in microbiology. In the case of the tardigrade, otherwise known as the water bear, there is yet to be research into where it came from or evolved from. What makes this creature unique is that it can withstand any form of temperature, and even survive in space from the lack of oxygen and the radiation from the Sun. The obvious reason as to why it is fairly recent in world history to research further these microorganisms is because of the use of electron microscopy.

In this way, technology would become incredibly important in understanding the world around us. It allows us to further explore these discoveries more in-depth. Of course, technology is not the root of discoveries, rather they merely assist scientists in uncovering those discoveries. Recently, one of the largest bioengineering project was undertaken to research giant mounds of termite colonies found in northeastern Brazil which are older than the Egyptian pyramids.

Though, this pursuit of knowledge can drive mankind to play God by defying conventional norms in order to satiate their curiosity. Typically, this type of theme is explored in Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" with Victor Frankenstein trying to resurrect the dead with the creation of the Creature, and by a team of researchers exploring an ancient city in Antarctica at the risk of their own physical and mental health in "At The Mountains Of Madness" by H. P. Lovecraft. In the latter's case, what they find completely contradicted what they supposedly knew.

In a real-world example, upon witnessing the testing of the nuclear weapons he helped create, physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer quoted the "Bhagavad Gita" in a documentary years later "I am now become Death. Destroyer of worlds." The fact that he referenced Hindu cosmology indicates that Oppenheimer's discovery resulted in a weapon that could destroy human civilization. If we are not responsible for our inquiries, our discoveries could have disastrous consequences.

However, what we know, as of November 2018, can truly fascinate us, rather than terrify us. There is the possibility that the Turritopsis nutricula might be the jellyfish that can reverse its polyp cells to its childhood form, thus continuing a cycle of immortality. A positive aspect of making scientific discoveries is that their inquiry could help uncover the methods to minimize human suffering.

Whether it has to do with a rarely researched topic or a previously unclassified species, what can be taken from this article is that we are all capable of making discoveries. These uncoverings could happen unexpectedly, since the world around us is a mystery in itself waiting to provide us with hints. We just need to take the initiative to explore those hints in-depth until we can truly make a discovery.

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Hailey Miller's Debut Single Is 'The One'

"The One" is available now across all streaming platforms.

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Being able to blend genres well is a true testament to a great artist, and Hailey Miller has done just that. Breaking onto the pop-country scene with her debut single "The One", the song speaks to the lessons that come out of unfortunate heartbreak, and definitely resonates with people going through one. I got the chance to talk with Hailey about her music, Nashville, and plans for the future:

1. What inspiration did you pull from to write "The One"?

"The One" was inspired by a relationship I was in. It was young love, not the healthiest relationship, and was dragged on for way longer than it should've been. I'd pretty much worked through all the heartbreak by the time it was fully over, and this song felt like the final piece to the puzzle. To acknowledge that some good came from the whole experience, and that lessons were learned. It just kind of poured out of me. It was exactly what I needed at the time. I wrote it and instantly felt peace. Like I could finally let it all go. It's a different kind of breakup anthem, and I hope that people can connect to it in the same way I did.

2. Do you tend to pull from personal experience to write or do you write using a third person perspective?

I definitely prefer to write from personal experience. I've written from a third person perspective, but it always feels more genuine for me to write about things I've been through first hand. It's just easier! It flows better, and feels more honest. Especially if I'm planning on using the song for myself. As an artist, I always want the truths I'm speaking to be genuine. I feel like people connect better that way. If I can't fully connect to the stuff I'm singing, how can I expect the listeners to? Personally, as an artist, the stories behind my songs are just as important to me as the song itself. That being said, if I can connect to someone else's experience deeply, writing third person can be just as fun!

3. What has your experience been like being a woman in the music industry?

You know, I don't have anything negative to say about my experience so far. I've felt respected as an artist from almost everyone I've personally come across in the industry. This being said, I'm very aware of the challenges females tend to face on a larger scale, especially in country. But I try to not let it phase me. In my mind, I'm just an artist…not a "female artist".

4. Growing up in Oregon, what/who inspired you to move to Nashville and write country music?

My earliest inspiration was definitely my aunt. She was singing country music professionally when I was super young, so I grew up seeing that and my family was super good about surrounding me with all sorts of music. My dad had this thing where he would always tell me to "listen to the words" and then at the end of the song I'd have to tell him what I thought it was about. It made me realize at a young age that music isn't just sound, it's stories. I fell in love with country music and its stories. Then came along these powerhouse female singer/songwriters…like Taylor Swift, and that was it. I knew it was something I wanted to do, and I knew Nashville was the place to do it. So, I learned the guitar, taught myself how to write, and made the move as soon as I possibly could! It's pretty much a 19 year old dream in the making at this point.

5. How has Nashville shaped your artistry and/or songwriting since moving there?

Nashville has already shaped my artistry and songwriting immensely. I think the biggest thing is being around so many talented artists and writers. It's super inspiring! Every time I go to a show or writer's round in town, I go home wanting to work even harder. That's the magic about Nashville. In a place where the industry could feel very competitive, the community is so amazing that instead of feeling intimidated, I feel inspired. I think that's so cool. Being able to learn your craft in an environment like that, where everybody is willing to collaborate and learn from each other. There's no room to sit still and not work hard. I think that alone has made me a better artist and writer. I've discovered my own unique writing style and sound, and can't wait to develop it even more.

6. What has your experience been like releasing your first single independently?

It's been amazing! I've had the best time with it. The process was so fun, and such a learning experience. Since it was my first release, I tried to go into it with little to no expectations and I've been blown away! The support I've received is beyond what I ever expected, and people are listening!! That's all I could've ever asked for. I think putting out music for any artist, independent or not, is always a little scary because there's this fear that people won't connect to such a personal part of you. There's so much work behind the scenes that goes into it. But it is so rewarding to read people's messages about how they connect or relate to the song. It's the best feeling in the world!

7. What are your future goals and aspirations within the music industry?

I ultimately just want to keep writing and putting out music that I love, and that other people love. Whether that's on a small scale level, or a larger scale. As long as I'm continuing to make music, I'm happy! That being said, I'd love to do some touring soon, and work towards my first EP/full length album.

8. Do you have plans to release new music soon?

Plans are in the works. I don't have a definitive date for you guys quite yet, but new music is on its way! I've been writing tons and I have some stuff that I'm dying to get out. I'd keep an eye out in the upcoming months for sure.

Listen to "The One" across all streaming platforms now and keep an eye out for future music from Hailey!


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8 Ways To Curve Writer's Block

If you feel that your best work is still in the process of writing or editing, ask for an extension so your article will be at its best.

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1. Write about how you have nothing to write about.

Hence, what I am exactly doing now. Writer's block and loss of motivation is normal for many creators and editors. When individuals read writing tips about having absolutely nothing to create, it can spark an idea and even create some motivation. If you have never heard of Charles Bukowski, (I haven't until right now) he is a poet that once said, "Writing about a writer's block is better than writing nothing at all." The sense of having zero motivation for writing happens all of the time and each creator is bound to hit that point sometime in their career.

2. Identify what is keeping you from writing.

There are a few causes that can accompany writer's block. Cause number one is time. Do not sit down and try to brainstorm at the wrong time when you could be outside taking a walk or hanging out with friends. Random ideas will pop up and if you don't already carry a notebook and pen with you, jot those ideas down in your phone. A simple walk down the block can be your perfect timing. Cause number two is often fear. Fear of how many readers will read your article, who will share it, and what will people think about it. Push it aside and write about what YOU want to write about. There is nothing motivational about making up a story just to reach the word count. It really does not matter what others think, it matters what you think. The last and final cause is perfectionism. Always remember that perfect is the enemy of good. One can never simple be perfect at anything, yet maybe they can master the art of writing but never be perfect.

3. If you can't identify then read other's articles.

I find myself gazing through the New York Times just to spark up an idea that can lead me to an article. Never copying any work, but simply gathering a few details that can turn into something worthy of actually reading. Reading about the National Dog Show can turn into "10 Different Reasons To Always Treat Your Pooch." Reading about a fashion show can transform into "The Best Organic Materials To Look For In Clothing." Ideas are out there, just go searching.

4. Use your own experience.

A bad date? A book you can't seem to finish? Do you hate algebra? All of your experiences are not boring and I am sure some reader out there will appreciate snippets of your life. Who doesn't love reading about a date that went wrong, or the perfect date! Thinking back to some of my best articles, my heartbreak was one of my most popular pieces. Most popular because many can relate. If you share an experience that others can relate to, you'll have a kick ass story.

5. Share the best articles you've ever read and comment on them.

The amount of articles that are truly out there are intense. Guaranteed you will find one idea that can turn into 500 or more words. "The Ultimate Productivity Hack is Saying No", "The Surprising Benefits of Journaling One Sentence Every Day", or "7 Ways to Retain More of Every Book You Read" are simple yet detailed articles to write. Why couldn't you think of any of those topics? Well same, I pulled them off of Best Articles: Over 100 Interesting Articles to Read by James Clear. Check out that article when your writer's block is so strong because out of 100 pieces to write about, you must find something.

6. Don't be afraid to ask for an extension.

If you procrastinate, that's okay because some people get their best work done at the last minute. However, writers have multiple deadlines and drafts they must complete before the final is good to go. Many companies take weeks and weeks to develop a final draft. But if you feel that your best work is still in the process of writing or editing, ask for an extension so your article will be at its best, you'll probably feel better to knowing your absolute finest writing is out there.

7. Pick up what's going on around you.

Society is a broad topic so dig deeper. What's going around town, your college, and on social media? If you take your college newspaper and check out some articles, the little inspiration you had may expand to see the problems going on around you everyday. A newspaper mainly has five categories, news, feature, opinion, arts & entertainment, and sports, Reading a sports article about a student who broke their leg? A broken leg can turn into "How to Care For Your Body During the Season." Taking local problems can expand into huge issues individuals face in everyday life. Always go for detail because each glimpse in someone's life can carry your article.

8. Write about tips.

Tips on how to curve writer's block makes a great article. Tips on how to stay healthy, follow your passion, and how to apply makeup, are all interesting topics. Many individuals don't fully read articles, they skim. For a few quick tips that are an easy read will flow traffic to your page and get you a few clicks.

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