The Thank-You Letter Mom And Dad Earned Years Ago, But Never Got Till Now

The Thank-You Letter Mom And Dad Earned Years Ago, But Never Got Till Now

Mom, Dad, I should have said this years ago.

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On the first day of every school year, the director of my high school, Mr. Dioli, would come up and give a speech to the entire school. By our senior year, we figured out that it was pretty much word for word the same speech every year, specifically a part about saying thank you. He said that every day you should go home and say two simple words to your parents, "thank you."

Now, as a senior feeling on top of the world, I paid little to no attention to this speech, as I was too busy focussing on getting out of there and going to college. I figured, I say thank you to my parents all the time, why should I specifically say thank you today after my last first day of high school?

However, now that it's five years later and I'm a (dare I say it) senior in college, I have fully realized that Mr. Dioli's speech was by far the most on-point speech I've ever heard. We all forget to thank our parents. We take most of what they do for granted and after you leave them, you truly realize how much you owe them.

So, now that I'm in my final year of college, I'm saying a thank you to my amazing parents who honestly deserve way more than just an article.

Dear Mom and Dad, Thank you.

Thank you for the past 21 years. For supporting me in every choice I make. For coming to every water polo and basketball game. For the early car rides to practice and the countless tournaments that took over our summers and weekends.

Thank you for dealing with me when I'm sick, and for always being willing to drop everything to make sure that Will and I are okay.

Thank you for allowing me to go to college where I want. Thank you for flying across the country to come to see me, and for allowing me to yell "Go Cocks" at the TV during every sporting event.

Thank you for being there every step of the way; for every adventure I take on and for encouraging me to continue to challenge myself.

It's because of you guys that I am the person I am today. I would not be nearly as confident, driven, or sarcastic if it wasn't for the lessons that you both have taught me.

From you two, I've learned the importance of sunscreen. I've learned that yelling at the television during sporting events is a totally normal practice. I've learned that "this could be the Christmas card" is just a way to get everyone in the picture to smile, and that even though no matter how much I complain, we will probably always do something active on Thanksgiving.

You've taught me how to be the bigger person. You've taught me that even if things do not work out in your favor, to continue to work hard because something will work out for you.

I can't thank you enough for everything that you've done for me. For all of the lessons learned, all of the trips made, tournaments watched, flights scheduled to South Carolina and phone calls made at random hours throughout the day.

I know that sometimes Will and I (but mostly Will) are huge pains to deal with, and we don't make anything easy, but we love you. I am nothing but grateful for everything that you have done for me and I can't imagine having anyone else to call mom and dad.

You guys are the best, and as much as I hate being across the country from you guys, it has made me realize how easy you guys made life for me back home, and how easy you made it for me to transition into college life and become an adult (even though I'm definitely not a real grown up yet).

Thank you again, I couldn't have done any of this without you.

Love,

Em

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Getting Straight A's In College Is Not Worth Failing Your Mental Health

A's are nice, but you are more than a letter.

Kate
Kate
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The idea of getting an A on every paper, every exam, every assignment, seems great. It can be known as a reassurance of our hard work and dedication to our 4+ classes we attend every single day.

Losing sleep, skipping meals, forgetting to drink water, skipping out on time with friends and family; these are the things that can occur when your letter of an A is what you are living for.

You are worth more than the grade letter, or the GPA number on your transcript.

Listen, don't get me wrong, getting A's and B's definitely is something to feel accomplished for. It is the approval that you did it, you completed your class, and your hard work paid off.

But honey, get some sleep.

Don't lose yourself, don't forget who you are. Grades are important, but the true measurement of self-worth and accomplishment is that you tried your best.

Trying your best, and working hard for your goals is something that is A-worthy.

Reserve time for yourself, for your sanity, your health, your mental health.

At the end of the day, grades might look nice on a piece of paper, but who you are and how you represent yourself can be even more honorable.

Kate
Kate

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I Stand Up To Harvard, And You Should, Too

Sororities, Fraternities, Students File Federal and State Suits that Challenge Harvard's Ban on Single-Sex Organizations

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A coalition of both male and female students are suing Harvard University in Massachusetts federal and state court over a campus policy discouraging private, single-sex organizations that blacklists students deemed to be members of single-sex sororities, fraternities, and Harvard-specific final clubs.

The federal complaint — filed by sororities, fraternities, and three unnamed College students — alleges that the sanctions constitute sex-based discrimination and violate federal anti-sex discrimination law Title IX and the United States Constitution. Harvard's sanctions — which took effect with the Class of 2021 — bar members of single-gender final clubs and Greek organizations from holding campus leadership positions, varsity team athletic captaincies, and from receiving College endorsement for prestigious fellowships like the Rhodes.

In the federal case, the plaintiffs are the international organizations for two sororities, Kappa Alpha Theta and Kappa Kappa Gamma; the parent groups for two fraternities, Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Sigma Chi; Harvard's chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon; and three current Harvard students who are also members of all-male social clubs. The undergraduates are not named in the suit.

The plaintiffs in the Massachusetts suit are the international parent group of sorority Alpha Phi, Harvard's newly reinstated chapter of Alpha Phi, and a management company for chapters of sorority Delta Gamma. Harvard has "succeeded perversely" in eliminating nearly every women's social organization previously available to female students at the school. Almost all of its all-women social clubs have closed their doors or renounced their status as women's social organizations and become co-ed, according to the plaintiffs.

Being in a sorority myself, Harvard's decision to ban members of Greek life from even running for campus leadership positions or scholarships is infuriating. Harvard has erased these empowering women's spaces, and it has done so paternalistically, without the input of these women and to the devastation of their organizations. These organizations have either had to renounce their proud status as women's organizations or commit to admitting men, which disrupts the very mission of sororities and tramples on students' rights to freedom of association.

The fraternity and sorority experience on campus, or greek life, carries many meanings and reputations for people. The way fraternity and sorority members are portrayed in society is unfortunate, especially given the amazing things these students do each and every day. College greek life typically includes social, professional, and academic groups that offer their members and constituents a sense of community and a rewarding co-curricular experience. Many, if not most, greek organizations offer networking opportunities to their members long after their college years. Many greek organizations are heavily involved in community service. These organizations have shown their ability to impact many people's lives throughout various outreach programs and philanthropic events. The leadership and professional attributes that are being developed throughout greek life affiliation is one that cannot go unnoticed.

As sorority and fraternity men and women, we should stand up to Harvard on behalf of all students, because we all have the right to shape our own leadership and social paths. Harvard simply cannot be allowed to erase the spaces members value for support and friendship, or ban members from opportunities as a punishment for being in Greek life. Stand up to Harvard.

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