First off, I don't know if Dave Filoni is a Christian. I haven't read any interview where he mentioned it one way or the other. But that's not why I brought him up.

A little introduction may be in order for those unfamiliar with good ole Dave. While fans of the fantastic Star Wars animated series, "Star Wars: The Clone Wars," will know all about Dave Filoni's contributions to the SW saga, casual readers may need a reminder. Having previously served as an animator the acclaimed "Avatar: The Last Airbender" series, Filoni was appointed show-runner of "The Clone Wars" and then creator/show-runner on its follow-up, "Star Wars Rebels," both of which have been hailed as some of the greatest animated TV shows of all time.

Although Filoni may have been show runner on "The Clone Wars," the big daddy of Star Wars, Mr. Lucas himself, was actively involved in its creation and production. Every week of the show's run, from inception to its cancellation due to Disney's obtaining Star Wars, Lucas mentored Filoni on directing, editing, storytelling, but on one thing most of all--how to make a Star Wars story.

Years later, we find Dave successfully on his own, still working on Star Wars but without Lucas as a guiding force. (Get it?) However, this is where my comparison comes in; Filoni is a master of humbly giving credit back to the one who helped him.

In every interview of his I have watched or read, Filoni (often casually) credits the creator of the Star Wars universe whenever the opportunity arises. In a recent interview conducted by starwars.com regarding the upcoming revival of "SW:TCW," Filoni brings up his name twice, even finishing his interview stating that (in regard to the "indelible impression" left on the fans by fleshing out the prequels,) "George knew it would. He always knew."

Filoni's comment is a priceless example of how Christians should refer to God. If we Christians were being honest with ourselves, how often do we openly and publicly acknowledge God for the work He's done in us? How often do we feel comfortable casually giving credit for any and all aspects of our lives to the Creator of our own universe?

Not flippantly, not overdoing it, nothing but simply, honestly, humbly saying, "Hey, I know I've been successful here, thank you for recognizing it. However, I have been blessed and helped out immensely on my path to get here and let me tell you Who did it."