Not so Clueless fashion

Not So 'Clueless' Fashion

The iconic fashion in the movie "Clueless" tells a story about each character.

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Directed by Amy Heckerling – known most famously for this specific film – "Clueless" follows main character Cher through adolescent life alongside her best friend and the equally as fashionable Dionne. Becoming an instant hit– when the film was released in 1995– "Clueless" intrigued the audience with not only it's infectious, relatable storyline, but largely in part because of the iconic fashion chosen for each character in the film. Thanks to genius costume designer Mona May, personality, social status, and wealth in the film were represented through each outfit carefully selected for each character.

Both Cher and Dionne are introduced to us as wealthy, popular girls at the very start of the film. In each scene, no matter the circumstance, both girls are dressed in trendy and visually expensive looking clothing. It is through these careful outfit selections that we can validate that Cher and Dionne are indeed both trendy and wealthy, being reminded of it visually in every scene they appear in.

Cher - Pictured on left. Dionne- Pictured on right. https://goo.gl/images/reKRtC

During one scene in the movie, Cher is wearing a maroon dress accented with a maroon headband. Later in the film, another character by the name of Amber is seen wearing the very same maroon dress. These series of scenes alone indicate to us what type of person both Cher and Amber are. Cher being the trend-setting, popular girl at her school and Amber being the popular girl that will follow whatever trend is necessary to maintain her social status.

https://goo.gl/images/4rjdf2Clueless (1995)

Amber- Pictured on far righthttps://goo.gl/images/pb7RCe

Fashion is also used in the film as a means of showing a character's transformation. Exchange student Tai quickly goes from burnout to popular girl thanks to the makeover Cher and Dionne so humbly bestowed upon her. This transformation from burnout to popular girl is shown greatly through the clothing Tai wears and the confidence the clothing provides her with. Upon arrival to her first day at a new high school, Tai is shown wearing a baggy graphic T-shirt and a worn looking flannel draped over it with a shy, quirky personality to match.

Taihttps://goo.gl/images/XugiP7

However, after the makeover, Tai is pictured in trendy, expensive looking clothing like the type of clothing Cher and Dionne would sport. Along with her new fashion, Tai begins to establish herself as one of the popular girls and adopts a sassy, confident personality.

https://goo.gl/images/J3JPS3

Clueless showcases the impact fashion choice and costume design can have on a film. The fashion within the film not only please the viewer because of the creativity and beauty of each outfit, but also aid in the storytelling of the film and help portray personality, social status, and wealth of each character in the film.

The thought process behind the fashion within this film was most definitely not "clueless."

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10 Outfits Every College Girl Wears To Class At Least Once

You can thank me later.
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It's happened on more than one occasion.

The occasion of being called out more than once for dressing down for class and by "down" I mean some of the haters we hate to love claiming that they can't see the shorts we're wearing under the oversized band tee on our way to class.

Contrary to popular belief, yes I'm not oblivious to how my choice of outfits for class tends to shift on the more comfortable side and yes, I am aware that it looks like I'm not wearing pants, I like it that way.

Every girl in college wears what they feel is comfortable enough to wear in a 2-hour lecture and these are my ideas of comfort.

1. The infamous oversized tee with Nike shorts.

I'll say it right now, I have a variety of assorted Soffee and Nike shorts that I pair with almost every oversized tee I own and it's my go-to for those 8 AM math lectures.

2. Oversized tee with leggings and riding boots.

Once the first red, yellow and orange leaf is found on campus grounds, you know you're about to see a swarm of college girls, like me, sporting riding boots in every shade of brown. Jeans optional.

3. Oversized tee with leggings and rain boots.

Once the first rainfall hits campus, you better believe you'll see this same 'fit paired with Hunter boots in almost every color.

4. The "I'm going to the gym right after class, I SWEAR" look.

Whether or not I have plans to go to the gym after class or not, I'm probably in my gym gear 4 times of the week and I'm not ashamed by it.

5. Jeans.

I've always had a hate/hate relationship with wearing jeans when I absolutely do not have to and here's why: they make my derriere completely disappear. When (and if) you catch me wearing jeans in lecture hall it's probably because someone paid me a large sum of money to do so.

6. Your boyfriend's flannel paired with... you guessed it, your favorite pair of leggings.

This is probably one of the many flannels I've stolen from my boyfriend and certainly not the last one. Paired with another favorite standard black leggings, you can't go wrong with this outfit to snooze in.

7. The baseball hat and quarter zip ensemble.

One of my all times favorites, you can't go wrong with a zipper up 3x too big for your body and a baseball hat you honestly forgot where you got it from. We also can't forget our infamous black leggings.

8. Your "walk of shame" outfit.

Now, this doesn't mean you roll up to Intro to Psychology wearing what you wore to the lacrosse mixer the night before, no. This is more of the outfit you so quickly had to throw on in a span of two minutes because you left so and so's apartment downtown an hour too late.

9. A v-neck.

Another one of my favorites.

10. Dresses (or anything even relatively formal).

Disclaimer: I personally would never come to class wearing this but gigantic kudos to cute a** girls that do decide to wear this because you look good.

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The Original Disney Princesses Are Just As Important To Young Children As The New Ones Are

The animated princesses have paved the way for children in ways the live-action films sometimes can't.

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Disney Princesses, particularly the animated ones, have somewhat of a stereotype built around them.

When people think of Disney Princesses, they usually think of the classic princesses from the 1930s through the 1950s, the Golden Age of Disney. They think of Snow White's high-pitched voice, Cinderella's passive nature, and Aurora's tendency to waltz through the woods singing a pretty little song. These were the original princesses, and they definitely started a trend of delicate characters who aren't entirely helpless, but they also aren't too willing to advocate for themselves and fight for what they want.

The Disney Renaissance, however, brought about a whole new world (yes, that was intended) of Disney Princesses.

In 1989, Disney kicked off their animation Renaissance with the release of The Little Mermaid, a film which introduced an entirely new Disney Princess. Ariel was stubborn, got into serious trouble at times, was endlessly curious and amazed by the world around (and above) her, and was more than willing to fight for what she wanted. She still maintained her status as a princess, but that wasn't her only personality trait.

And the stereotypes kept breaking more and more with the introduction of two new princesses, Belle and Jasmine. They both followed Ariel's example of being more than just a pretty face in their own ways. Belle was the most beautiful girl in her village, but she didn't allow that to define her. She was well-read, confident, loyal, and desired nothing more than adventure. Jasmine, on the other hand, was the daughter of a Sultan and was forced to choose a prince to marry. But she wanted no part in this, and she set out to find herself and married the man she chose for herself. She was fiercely independent and didn't let anyone stand in her way.

I recently read an article about how the live-action remakes of Disney films are giving Disney princesses like Belle and Jasmine entirely new roles and how they're better role models for girls than ever before. While I do agree that young girls who go to see the remakes of Aladdin and Beauty and the Beast in theaters will definitely have good role models to look up to, we really shouldn't be dismissing the original princesses, either.

These new Disney princesses are not replacements for the old ones. Just because the old princesses don't have as much of a "strong independent woman" complex about them doesn't mean they still can't teach important lessons to young children. Yes, the original Belle and Jasmine may not have been as outspoken as they are in the new remakes, but they always had a quiet strength about them and a certainty in who they were. This is just as good of a lesson to teach young children.

One of the most important lessons a child can learn is to be themselves in all parts of life, no matter how many people may think they're strange. Both versions of Belle and Jasmine teach this lesson, but as we start to move into an era where children may grow up with the remakes instead of the originals, it's also extremely important that they learn the lessons the original Belle and Jasmine taught us in the first place. Sometimes, a person doesn't need to be incredibly outspoken in order to be who they are. Sometimes, all they need is a good head on their shoulders, a joyful heart, and quiet confidence in themselves to live the life they've always dreamt of.

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