I'm proud to say that I don't argue with anyone about politics on Facebook. I'm even prouder to say that I don't stand in the pit holding signs that condemn passersby to Hell.

As slighted as that may be, it's the truth. I have a personal mission to live in such a way that represents Christ, and condemnation is just not it. In fact, Jesus spent most of his time calling the "holy" people out for being hypocrites (check Romans 2:1).

I think that those who boil Jesus' message down to a list of "dos" and "don'ts" have missed the point. Sure, we are called to follow the law. But those under the law are the only ones required to follow it. It's totally unfair to expect people who don't claim Jesus to follow him. Heck, it's hard enough to get most Christians to follow him!

Really, the Bible puts it plainly: you can't receive forgiveness if you're not willing to give it (check Col. 3:13 & Mat. 6:14).

Is it my goal to see everyone living in such a way that glorifies God? Of course. But Jesus himself knew that the way to change lives was not to tell people how wrong they are. Instead, he just hung out and did life with the counter-cultural outcasts of society.

This doesn't mean that Jesus enabled sin. He just radically loved the people who were trapped in it. Take the woman at the well, for example. He loved her, he stood up for her, and he saved others from (lawfully, at the time) stoning her to death for being an adulterer. Then he called her to stop living an adulterous life.

Furthermore? No one can live up to Jesus' standards. Yes, that includes Gary.

It breaks my heart to think that the pit preacher might be the most prominent picture of Christianity on this campus. I am respectful of others' beliefs and I really do cherish the diversity of all kinds.

God does not hate you for who you love. God does not hate you for what you wear. God does not hate you for what you consume. His followers shouldn't, either.