Bob And Linda Belcher

I Aspire To Have A Relationship As Good As Bob And Linda Belcher's

"Two people, together forever! Security in life, and someone to love ya!"

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I know it's fiction, but "Bob's Burgers" is a great show to take life advice from. Tina reminds us to always go for what we want, even if it's completely unattainable. Louise reminds us to find opportunities in everything we do. Gene reminds us to not take everything so seriously. But the greatest lesson comes from Bob and Linda.

The relationship between Bob and Linda is always something that has caught my eye, mainly because it is not often we see a fictional TV couple work so well together. Unlike other animated TV show couples, Bob and Linda have an extremely normal relationship. They have a genuine love for each other and work well as a team.

One of my favorite things about this couple is that they're secure. In the first episode of the series, it's established that Linda left Hugo, the local health inspector, for Bob. Even though Bob's restaurant is going down the drain, Linda stands by her decision and is proud to tell that to her ex-fiance.

In addition to that, Bob and Linda are a couple that knows what it means to be supportive. Not only do they support their children in their many endeavors, but they also cheer each other on when it comes to new activities. When Linda gets her old high school band back together, Bob is there to cheer her on. When Bob desperately wants to join a garden club, Linda encourages him to do whatever it takes to get in, although she might've gone overboard when she suggested sleeping with the garden owner.

Bob and Linda are also pretty level-headed about their relationship. In one episode, Linda flashes thousands of people on a newscast to prove a point. Bob does not get angry about this once. In fact, that is not even the thing he's most worried about in that scene. Honestly, if that's not goals then I don't know what is. Don't get me wrong, these two know how to throw a few jabs at each other here and there, but it's always with a good heart behind it.

I'd be happy to have a relationship as secure and as fun as Bob and Linda's. They are the epitome of what it means to be all in when it comes to relationships.

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36 Rules Of Life From 'NCIS's' Leroy Jethro Gibbs

Sometimes we all need a smack on the back of the head.
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I have been watching "NCIS" since the show began back in 2003, and season 15 will be airing this September. It is one of the longest running series and for a good reason, even though a lot of your favorite characters die off in the show they somehow still keep it alive. Anyone who has watched an episode or more knows about the infamous Gibbs's rules. Here's the list that we can gather from the many episodes:

Rule 1: "Never let suspects stay together." - revealed in the Season 1 premiere episode, Yankee White (episode).

Rule 2: "Never screw over your partner." - revealed in the Season 4 episode, Blowback (episode). McGee also stated this rule to Ned Dorneget in Need to Know (episode). McGee also mentioned to Abigail Borin in Ships in the Night (episode) that rule number one has been taken twice, showing that he knows that there are two number one rules.

Rule 3: "Always wear gloves at a crime scene." - revealed in "Yankee White."

Rule 4: "Don't believe what you're told. Double check." - again revealed in "Yankee White."

Rule 5: "Never be unreachable." - revealed in the Season 3 episode, Deception (episode) although Gibbs has been known to be intentionally unreachable. The rule was shown in Rule Fifty-One (episode) in the background when Gibbs opens the box.

Rule 6: "The best way to keep a secret? Keep it to yourself. Second best? Tell one other person - if you must. There is no third best." - revealed in the Season 4 episode, Blowback (episode)

Rule 7: "You don't waste good." - revealed in the Season 8 episode, Baltimore (episode).

Rule 8: "Never say you're sorry. It's a sign of weakness." - This rule has been mentioned throughout the series, but it wasn't given a specific number until Flesh and Blood (episode). The rule is also a direct reference to John Wayne's catch phrase in "She Wore A Yellow Ribbon" (John Ford, Director). Wayne said: "Never apologize, mister, it's a sign of weakness." to subordinates in a military situation. DiNozzo notes the connection in Hiatus Part 1 (episode). Mark Harmon's career has paralleled John Wayne's. They both were quarterback of their southern California college football team, both went into acting. (Harmon's father, Tom Harmon, was a Heisman Trophy-winner and actor & announcer as well.) Note: This is continuously told to Tony, Ziva and Tim through a smack to the back of their heads.

Rule 9: "Always be specific when you lie." - revealed in the Season 1 finale episode, Reveille (episode).

Rule 10: "Never take anything for granted." - revealed in the Season 3 episode, Probie (episode) although Gibbs also quotes it as being "Never assume" during the Season 9 episode, Rekindled (episode).

Rule 11: "Never go anywhere without a knife." - revealed in the Season 1 episode, One Shot, One Kill (episode)although it's sometimes quoted as "Never leave home without a knife" or "Always carry a knife."

Rule 12: "Never get personally involved in a case." - revealed in the Season 7 episode, Obsession (episode) and again referenced by the new SECNAV Clayton Jarvis in the Season 9 premiere episode, Nature of the Beast (episode) as the number one rule in Washington politics.

Rule 13: "When the job is done, walk away." - revealed in the Season 6 episode, Semper Fidelis (episode).

Rule 14: "Never date a co-worker." - revealed in the Season 1 episode, Enigma (episode).

Rule 15: "Never, ever involve lawyers." - revealed in "Collateral Damage." Rule 51 is written on the back of the card containing Rule 13 in "Rule Fifty-One."

Rule 16: "Bend the line, don't break it." - revealed in Anonymous was a Woman (episode).

Rule 17: "Always work as a team." - revealed in Leap of Faith (episode).

Rule 18: "If someone thinks they have the upper hand, break it." - revealed in the Season 8 finale episode, Pyramid (episode).

Rule 19: "Never, ever interrupt Gibbs during an interrogation." - revealed in the Season 14 episode, Privileged Information (episode).

Rule 20: "It's better to seek forgiveness than ask permission." - revealed in Silver War (episode).

Rule 21: "Always look under." - revealed in The Artful Dodger (episode)

Rule 22: "Never ever bother Gibbs in interrogation." - revealed in Smoked (episode).

Rule 23: "Never mess with a Marine's coffee... if you want to live."- revealed during "Forced Entry."

Rule 24: "There are two ways to follow someone. First way, they never notice you. Second way, they only notice you." - Jack Knife (episode) and "Rule Fifty-One."

Rule 25: "When you need help, ask." - revealed during Blood Brothers (episode).

Rule 26: "Always watch the watchers." - revealed in "Baltimore."

Rule 27: "If you feel like you are being played, you probably are." - revealed in Nature of the Beast (episode).

Rule 28: "Your case, your lead." - revealed in Bounce (episode) placing Tony as temporarily in charge of the team, and also in Phoenix (episode) with Ducky as leader.

Rule 29: "There is no such thing as coincidence." - revealed in Obsession (episode) although DiNozzo states that Rule 39A is "There is no such thing as a small world" during Canary (episode).

Rule 30: "If it seems like someone is out to get you, they are." - revealed in Borderland (episode).

Rule 31: "Never accept an apology from someone who just sucker punched you." - revealed in Psych Out (episode).

Rule 32: "First things first, hide the women and children." - This rule number was mentioned in Patriot Down (episode) but was not stated until Rule Fifty-One (episode).

Rule 33: "Clean up the mess that you make." - revealed in "Rule Fifty-One" although it's also stated as "Never leave behind loose ends" in Hiatus Part 2 (episode).

Rule 34: "Sometimes you're wrong." - Created by Gibbs in Rule Fifty-One" by writing it on the back of the card containing Rule 13. It is unknown if his coworkers are aware of this rule.

Rule 35: "Always give people space when they get off an elevator." - revealed in Double Back (episode)

Rule 36: "Never trust a woman who doesn't trust her man." - revealed in Devil's Triangle (episode).



While some seem to deal with Gibbs only there are some very great life lessons present. If you haven's started watching "NCIS" I suggest you start soon, it is all on Netflix.

"A slap to the face is an insult - a slap to the back of the head is a wake-up call." Leroy Jethro Gibbs
Cover Image Credit: CBS TV / Twitter

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10 Reasons You Should Be Watching 'Tickling Giants' Right Now

Are you brave enough to tell a joke?

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The streets of Cairo, Egypt erupt with protests over politics. There's one man giving a voice to those without power. He is representing the people through satirical comedy, directed at the ruling elites. That man is Dr. Bassem Youssef, and he is the subject of Sara Taksler's extraordinary documentary; "Tickling Giants".

"Tickling Giants" follows Bassem Youssef (the proclaimed "Egyptian Jon Stewart") as he pushes the boundaries of Egyptian regimes in a political satire comedy show. As the only one of it's kind in Egypt, "The Show" garnered over 30 million views each week, accounting for more than 40% of the Egyptian population (to put that in perspective, "The Daily Show," Americans ultimate political satire comedy, only reached 2 million views at the height of it's popularity)!

Egypt is not a country known for their freedom of speech and tolerance of dissent, so Taksler, the film's creator, was fascinated by the work Bassem Youssef, a heart surgeon turned YouTube comedian turned late night television host, was doing in Egypt. She could never have predicted what was to come.

Find the trailer here, and think I hope you get the chance to then watch the film, because...

1. It's funny.

"Side-splittingly funny"

If you're at all familiar with "The Daily Show" with Jon Stewart/Trevor Noah, then you know it's a comedy show based on intelligent and sometimes scathing satire. And as someone who used to watch it almost daily, I can tell you, it was hilarious.

Bassem Youssef models his comedy show, aptly titled "The Show," or "AlBernameg" in Arabic, off of "The Daily Show," but the stakes are much higher in Egypt's authoritarian regime. That doesn't stop Youssef and his team from giving comedy their best effort, and the result is a laugh-out-loud journey of jokes, success, and some of the hardest setbacks in the history of comedic television.

2. It's interesting.

"The Show" with Bassem Youssef

"Tickling Giants" not only tells the story of Youssef, it also chronicles the efforts of his staff, the evolution of his show and the changing political environment of Egypt. With beautiful and eye-opening footage, as well as a collection of interviews with both supporters and protesters alike, there is not a second of the documentary's 111 minutes wasted. Fans of satire and drama, political news and late-night tv alike will find something to love in Taksler's masterpiece.

3. It’s a cautionary tale.

"Not now?" Trailer Screenshot

"This show is about holding authority accountable, regardless of who's in charge." Youssef can be found saying in the trailer and publicity events beyond. This documentary and Youssef's journey perfectly show the dangers of a regime that is afraid of comedy and demonizes/tries to limit the press. It quickly shows the erosion of rights that we take for granted in the Western world and clues us in on just what we need to notice in order not to lose those rights.

Words are powerful. And when an authority in power tries to inhibit control, it may be time to start "tickling giants".

4. It's got some fun animation.

Flappy Giants

Advertisement for free Tickling Giants game

On staff at Youssef's "The Show," there was an expert animator who contributed his talents to the film. These drawings perfectly encapsulate what the documentary, and Youssef's actions, are about. With huge Godzilla-like dictators stomping on cities to Youssef's character running around the streets brandishing his feather like a weapon, these little scenes add a whole new element unique to many documentaries that come before.

5. It's professional.

Everything about the documentary is well-put together, well-said, and all around expertly done. With clear film from interviews, snippets of Youssef's show and footage from many riots and protests throughout the streets of Cairo, it is no secret that this film is built to last. And last it should, because it's messages and ideals are a privilege for anyone to learn (more on that below).

6. It's powerful.

"If your regime is not strong enough..."

"There's a lot to laugh at, and to learn from, in Tickling Giants," says New York Times critic, Ken Jaworowski. Director Sara Taksler would agree.

I got the chance to meet her, and besides her well-spoken ideals about the power of comedy in the political sphere, she told me that if nothing else, the main lesson she wants to impart on people through her film is this: "Find creative, nonviolent ways to express yourself when you see an abuse of power."

This is what Bassem Youssef is doing through his show, and as you observe his journey from surgeon to late-night comedian, you'll begin to fully appreciate the life you have and hopefully come away with these 5 takeaways.

7. It's eye-opening.

YouTube Tickling Giants Trailer

It's obvious to many that Western powers largely possess a certain stereotype and stigma around the Middle East. These prevailing generalizations many hold, from ideas of Middle Eastern culture, religions, peoples, etc., can prevent us from really attempting to learn about different parts of the world. "Tickling Giants" gives Western audiences, who Taksler often stated was her target audience for making this film, a chance to peer into this other area of the world and realize that culture and people are not something to be stigmatized, but something to be appreciated and understood.

Not only is it opening eyes to another culture, the film also reminds audiences how lucky they are to have free speech, an idea that's under attack in many areas of the world. Youssef's struggles throughout making this show (of which we see plainly through the lens of the documentary camera) remind us just how powerful our words are, and to not take them for granted.

8. It's really good.

"First rate documentary"

I've watched the entire thing, and would do so again in a second. Every part of it is engaging and it's hard to know what comes next. Everyone I've talked to in my life has loved it, but don't just take it from me or my community. Take it from these well-known reviewers:

""Tickling Giants" is a terrific movie that leaves you cherishing (a little more) the freedom we have, and holding in contempt (a little more) those who would compromise it."-Variety

""Tickling Giants" surprises us on several levels."-LA Times

"A beautiful, funny, charming, insightful, laugh until you cry, and then cry until you laugh film."-Huffington Post

"A first-rate documentary"-The New York Times

And more! (Plus it has a 100% on Rotten Tomatoes "Tomatometer" so you can't really argue with that)

9. It's easy to get.

Tickling Giants Availability

Note: these dates are for 2017 so you can get the movie now without waiting

After you watch the trailer (and finish this article), you can find "Tickling Giants" almost immediately wherever you are. Here are some of the best places you can find this extraordinary documentary:

Tickling Giants Website

Amazon Prime

YouTube

Vudu

Google Play

Itunes

10. It's human.

I'll let that point speak for itself.

I hope this article has convinced you to watch "Tickling Giants", or if you have already watched it, reflect on the many positive aspects of the movie.

Tickling Giants is daring, funny, and more timely than ever. I hope you get a chance to witness it.

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