What It's Like Being The Firstborn
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What It's Like Being The Firstborn

Being the oldest child is a blessing, but it's full of pressure!

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What It's Like Being The Firstborn
Photo Credit: Taylor Contarino

I've been the oldest child for seventeen years now, and I still get complaints from my youngest-child friends who claim that being the youngest-child is a ridiculously unfair and unjust experience! However, for me, being the firstborn brings about a whole lot of stress, as much as I enjoy being the most independent child of the family. Firstborn constitutes a part of my identity. A Firstborn epitomizes the image of a natural leader, boss, or CEO, dressed for success and garbed in clothing built for confidence. Firstborns dress to match how they feel, which is sophisticated, poised, confident, and determined. With extra sugar and caffeine, a Firstborn tastes like steaming hot coffee, full of energy, passion, and excitement to accomplish his or her goals, even on the most exhausted and fatigued mornings.

Firstborns smell like Bath & Body Works Signature Scents; A Firstborn epitomizes the image of a natural leader, boss, or CEO, dressed for success and garbed in clothing built for confidence. Firstborns dress to match how they feel, which is sophisticated, poised, confident, and determined. With extra sugar and caffeine, a Firstborn tastes like steaming hot coffee, full of energy, passion, and excitement to accomplish his or her goals, even on the most exhausted and fatigued mornings. Firstborns smell like Bath & Body Works Signature Scents; drawing attention when entering a room, and making the mark of a leader, someone to recognize instantly, much like a sweet, coconut scent. Like a soft and silky sweater, a Firstborn feels resilient, comfortable, and soft. Like the breathtaking sounds of the ocean waves enveloping the brittle sand, a Firstborn sounds eloquent, smooth, and peaceful. A Firstborn is confident, energetic, and passionate, much like a morning cup of coffee or ocean waves crashing in the Islands.

Empowered, disciplined, and full of pressure; this is what the Firstborn feels like. In continuation, being the Firstborn is like being the President- an isolated individual with a lot of pressure, and not a lot of advice or room for error. A Firstborn is comparable to a teacher, because both figures act as leaders, inspirations, and role models. Like a manager or supervisor, the Firstborn is responsible to independently remain on track, organize his or her self, and refocus when he or she strays from their path. A Firstborn acts as a role model for his or her siblings, much like a famous pop star, performer, or speaker acts as a role model to their fans. With age comes independence, and Firstborns are the first in their families to encounter adolescence, with no role model to employ help from.

A Firstborn's actions elucidate like muddy footprints on a clean floor, shining as footsteps for their younger siblings to follow in. Like a 'City Upon A Hill,' Firstborns are recognizable motivators, inspirations, and role models for younger people to observe and imitate. Being a Firstborn is like being a Team Captain or a Coach because every move I make is observed, and everybody yearns to see the results I achieve. Firstborns' positions can be comparable to those of leadership figures in high positions, as both Firstborns and leaders like Presidents, teachers, and managers share traits of independence, motivation, and drive.

Ingenuous, manipulative, outgoing, and attention-seeking; these are characteristics that are not associated with the Firstborn child. These characteristics are all associated with the youngest child, who is often known for his or her problemacy, and for getting away with far more than the Firstborn. Moreover, being the Firstborn is unlike being the middle child or baby of the family because the Firstborn has high aspirations, an open slate, no baseline, and no shoes to aspire to fill. In contrast with the youngest child, the Firstborn is known as law-abiding, conservative, and a rule follower. The youngest child's deviant anomaly can be attributed to his or her desire for attention and experimentation, while the oldest child's sophistication and tendency to abide by the rules is usually due to his or her desire for success, acceptance, and reverence. As a Firstborn, I have the most pressure on my shoulders, and my parents are harder on me than they are on my siblings.

My youngest sibling is more apt to get what she wants without being scolded, while my little brother prefers to keep to himself, peaceful being isolated and alone. Furthermore, the consequences my siblings and I each receive for our mistakes and wrongdoings are different; my penalties are the harshest, my little brother's are lesser, and consequences for my littlest sister do not exist at all.

The Firstborn is unlike the baby or middle child of the family because the Firstborn was born before his or her siblings were and he or she exhibits traits of higher maturity than the other siblings do. Being the Firstborn is unlike being juvenile, naive, and ingenuous. Unlike my younger siblings, I have intense pressure on my shoulders, a result of being groomed for success all throughout my life.

Being the Firstborn accentuates my independence, motivated scholarships, and maturity. As the Firstborn, I consider myself responsible for acting as a role model, aspiration, and put-together leader for my younger siblings, family members, and friends to look up at. In the future, I believe my position as Firstborn will influence the career I choose, positions I earn, and levels of education I achieve. I am proud to be a Firstborn, and I believe I play the part to the best of my ability to pave the way for the success of my younger peers.drawing attention when entering a room, and making the mark of a leader, someone to recognize instantly, much like a sweet, coconut scent. Like a soft and silky sweater, a Firstborn feels resilient, comfortable, and soft. Like the breathtaking sounds of the ocean waves enveloping the brittle sand, a Firstborn sounds eloquent, smooth, and peaceful. A Firstborn is confident, energetic, and passionate, much like a morning cup of coffee or ocean waves crashing in the Islands.

Empowered, disciplined, and full of pressure; this is what the Firstborn feels like. In continuation, being the Firstborn is like being the President- an isolated individual with a lot of pressure, and not a lot of advice or room for error. A Firstborn is comparable to a teacher, because both figures act as leaders, inspirations, and role models. Like a manager or supervisor, the Firstborn is responsible to independently remain on track, organize his or her self, and refocus when he or she strays from their path. A Firstborn acts as a role model for his or her siblings, much like a famous popstar, performer, or speaker acts as a role model to their fans. With age comes independence, and Firstborns are the first in their families to encounter adolescence, with no role model to employ help from.

A Firstborn's actions elucidate like muddy footprints on a clean floor, shining as footsteps for their younger siblings to follow in. Like a 'City Upon A Hill,' Firstborns are recognizable motivators, inspirations, and role models for younger people to observe and imitate. Being a Firstborn is like being a Team Captain or a Coach because every move I make is observed, and everybody yearns to see the results I achieve. Firstborns' positions can be comparable to those of leadership figures in high positions, as both Firstborns and leaders like Presidents, teachers, and managers share traits of independence, motivation, and drive.

The letter 'F' for Firstborn accentuates my independence, motivated scholarliness, and maturity. As the Firstborn, I consider myself responsible for acting as a role model, aspiration, and put-together leader for my younger siblings, family members, and friends to look up at. In the future, I believe my position as Firstborn will influence the career I choose, positions I earn, and levels of education I achieve. I am proud to be a Firstborn, and I believe I play the part to the best of my ability to pave the way for the success of my younger peers.
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