19 Times November Is The Toughest Month For "Adulting"

19 Times November Is The Toughest Month For "Adulting"

I want my mummy.
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Adulting is defined by Oxford Dictionary as "The practice of behaving in a way characteristic of a responsible adult, especially the accomplishment of mundane but necessary tasks."

Since moving out of my house, and attending University, I have come across the most obvious and biggest struggles of adulting, the fun of finances and forms plaguing my ever-growing life. To refrain from becoming depressed as I embark on my 21st birth-week, here is a list of 20 times in the last month that adulting has presented challenges on the smaller scale.

1. Opening a wine bottle that isn't a twist off.

I have been known to serve guests wine through a pasta strainer to avoid feeding them pieces of cork.

2. Learning how to and trying to pull off cooking one of my mum’s dishes.

Last week, as Autumn is certainly here, I attempted to make my mother's famous stew and ended up burning lentils to the bottom of the pan, which I then left in the sink, and the lentils got stuck. RIP pan.

3. Forgetting to set aside money for bills and traveling home.

Sometimes I forget that even me writing this article is costing me a meal's worth of money. And when the time comes to pay my bills, I swear to myself that next month I will sit in the dark all day.

4. Living paycheck to paycheck.

I now know the exact date that my paychecks come in, and if they are a second late, I am on my laptop writing a strongly worded email. You forget that there is nobody to spot you 20 for lunch, so you're just stuck eating the testers at the farmer's market.

5. Realizing Dayquil is not the answer to all my sicknesses (and a hangover doesn't count as a cold)

The constant hangover cannot be cured with Dayquil. I'm not sick, just an idiot.

6. Moving houses.

This is probably the WORST thing about adulting. As students, we move around a lot. Each year is a battle to figure out where you will be living in 11 month's time. And on top of that struggle is how to move your stuff, and how to fit your sofa through the door of your new place without deconstructing it.

7. Forgetting to use oven gloves, or misplacing them and thinking I am Superwoman.

You are not Superman. You will get burnt. You will regret it.

8. Oversleeping.

About 3 times a week, my alarm is turned off by a hand which is magically detached from the rest of my body and my brain. These are the mornings you need the shrill voice of your mother at your door.

9. Wanting a pet when I can’t even feed/walk myself.

I've wanted a pet for such a long time. But on those days when I order in from a restaurant literally 4 minutes from my house, paying the $5 delivery fee because I'm just that damn lazy, I stop to think and ask myself how I would ever walk my dog.

10. Buying gifts for all my family members.

I love surprising my parents with amazing birthday presents, things that they will cherish, appreciate, and enjoy. Sucks that all I can afford is a card and a selection of snacks from the corner shop.

11. Not having someone to call in sick for me.

It's really awkward having to call into work the day after Halloween, knowing that they're not going to believe your fake cough and sniffles down the phone.

12. Having to decide to apologize for me.

I grew up with two younger brothers. While I love them, we did and still do torture each other occasionally. Nowadays my mother makes us fend for ourselves, leaving me to deal with the fact that they are both now grown men, and despite being 3 and 6 years younger, are both far stronger than me. However, when we were younger she would force us to apologise. Sometimes it's difficult having to make that decision by yourself, having to recognise when it's your turn to extend a hand to shake.

13. Wanting a Christmas tree SO bad, but not being able to afford one.

This was maybe the saddest thing about checking my bank account last week. Every year my family gets a huge Christmas tree for the living room. This is my first year as a student living in a detached house, and not having a tree or decorations hung outside.

14. Realizing kitchen cabinets do not close themselves.

Something I realise more and more every day as I walk into the kitchen and it looks like we've had some paranormal activity in the house. Also something I need to change as I have been known to walk into the cabinet doors.

15. Not having quarters for laundry. EVER.

I miss having a washing machine that isn't coin operated, and that doesn't eat your quarters. leaving you to construct a makeshift washing line in your kitchen with tied-together trash bags.

16. Quality products vs your bank account.

I miss opening the kitchen cabinets to an assortment of expensive snacks like trailmix, organic peanut butter and homemade marmalade. Right now I can tell you that I have instant coffee, two packets of instant miso soup, a Cliff Bar that I got for free from some on-campus promotion, and half a jar of Skippy.

17. Telling your sober self that my drunk self will make the bed when I get home.

Make the bed before you go out. Please. Don't sleep on top of your clean laundry, still in your boots from the night. Please.

18. Checking the mail is becoming depressing.

I used to receive my mum's subscription for Teen Vogue, birthday cards, and a weekly organic food delivery. Now I live alone, I receive bills, coupon newspapers (which I use, by the way), and bank statements which I daren't look at.

19. Getting to the airport is really expensive.

When I finally decide that adulting is too much for me, the flight home has a real sting in its tail as getting to the airport costs about as much as my groceries for the week. Well, at least I'm going home.

Cover Image Credit: PopSugar

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To All Incoming Freshmen, When You Get To College, Please Don't Be THAT Freshman

I am pretty sure we all know who I'm talking about.

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As we are all counting down the days to return to campus, students are looking forward to meeting new people and reuniting with old friends. And then, there is the freshman.

We have all been there. The eagerness and excitement have been slowly building up through months of summer vacation, all waiting for this moment. I understand the anxiousness, enthusiasm, and insecurities. The opportunity to meet new people and explore a new area is very intriguing. But let's be real, you are here to make memories and get an education. So here are a few pieces of advice from a former college freshman.

1. Don't be that freshman who follows their significant other to college

This is the boy or girl who simply can not think for themselves. The 17-year-old puts their own personal goals and interests aside to sacrifice for a six-month high school relationship. This will more than likely end at an end of semester transfer after the relationship has been tested for a month or two in college life. So if you want to really enjoy your freshman year, make your own decisions and do what is best for you.

2. Don't be that freshman who lets their parents pick their major

"You are not going to school just to waste my money."

This is a statement you might have heard from your parents. As true as it might seem, this is definitely not a good way to start your college years. If you are not majoring in something you can see yourself doing, you are wasting your time. You can major in biology, go to medical school, and make the best grades. But if deep down you don't want to be a doctor, you will NOT end up being a good doctor. When it comes to picking your major, you really have to follow your heart.

3. Don't be that freshman who gets overwhelmed with the first taste of freedom

Yes. It is all very exciting. You don't have a curfew, you don't have rules, you don't have anyone constantly nagging you, but let's not get carried away. Don't be the freshman who gets a tattoo on the first night of living on your own. Don't be the freshman who tries to drink every liquor behind the bar. Don't be the freshman who gets caught up being someone that they aren't. My best advice would be to take things slow.

4. Don't be that freshman who starts school isolated in a relationship

I'm not telling you not to date anyone during your freshman year. I am saying to not cut yourself off from the rest of the world while you date someone. Your first year on campus is such an amazing opportunity to meet people, but people are constantly eager to start dating someone and then only spend time with that person.

Be the freshman who can manage time between friends and relationships.

5. Don't be that freshman who can't handle things on their own

It is your first year on your own. Yes, you still need help from your parents. But at this point, they should not be ordering your textbooks or buying your parking pass. If you need something for a club or for class, YOU should handle it. If you're having roommate problems, YOU should handle it, not your parents. This is the real world and college is a great time for you to start building up to be the person you want to be in the future, but you can't successfully do that if your parents still deal with every minor inconvenience for you.

6. Don't be that freshman who only talks to their high school friends

I know your high school was probably amazing, and you probably had the coolest people go there. However, I believe that college is a great time to be on your own and experience new things. Meeting new people and going to new places will allow you to grow into a more mature person. There is a way to balance meeting new friends and maintaining friendships with childhood friends, and I am sure you will find that balance.

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Why Generation Z Is Going To Take The World By Storm

Generation Z will change the world

Jenn
Jenn
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We've heard it all our lives: "These kids these days" from our grandparents, parents, and other adults. We've become accustomed to being grouped with Millennials even though their age range is 1981-1996, which makes the youngest Millennial twenty-two. So what's the big difference between Millennials and Generation Z?

For starters, we're the first majority non-white U.S generation (yay for diversity). In fact, we were dubbed "Millennials on steroids" by Business Inside when it came to our opinions on sexuality, race, inclusion, women's rights, and God. But a big difference between us and the Millennial generation is that we are more realistic than them. Millennials grew up during a prosperous time in U.S history, but Generation Z grew up during a recession and know that financial security is not promised. In fact, a survey by Business Insider states sixty-eight percent of Generation Z believe the U.S is headed in a bad direction, more than any other generations' opinion on American prosperity.

And the last attribute that makes us different from our predecessors: digital comfortability. We didn't pioneer the digital age; we were born into it. We knew how to use computers by the age of five and could work smartphones better than our parents by age ten. We know the internet and how powerful it can be. With the knowledge we've gained from it, we realized we can start movements just by using our thumbs and learn new things with a click of a button. With the oldest Generation Z'ers being twenty-one, its hard to predict how we'll change the world, but I believe that we'll make a lasting and positive impact on the world.

Jenn
Jenn

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