8 Words You Didn't Know You Needed Until Now

8 Words You Didn't Know You Needed Until Now

Describe those feelings you didn't know had words.
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Sometimes in life, we experience feelings that are hard to describe, beyond just “sad” or “excited.” These emotions can be so specific that we feel as if we’re the only ones to feel them, because of how hard they are to articulate. Fortunately, others have felt these things and filled the gaps with words that are actually quite useful in describing emotions we would otherwise fail to communicate. Here are some words that you never knew you need until now:

1. Onism

The definition: This is defined as the frustration of being stuck in just one body at any time, unable to experience more than one thing or be in more than one place, knowing that there are a million things you won’t be able to do before you die.

A time you might use it: Watching the videos of current historical events tucked away in the calm of your room thousands of miles away, knowing that even a live video isn’t the same as feeling the sweat of protestors or hearing the whisper of a crowd in front of a capitol building.

2. Jouska

The definition: The imaginary and often lively conversation that you carry out in your head between yourself and someone else.

A time you might use it: When you’re psyching yourself up for a confrontation and you want to practice the calm, measured argument you’ll say (which will immediately be thrown out in favor of crying once the argument starts). Or when you’re driving home and think of the perfect comeback and imagine the scenario as it’d have gone if you hadn’t just gasped like a fish out of water when you got that sick burn.

3. Rubatosis

The definition: The awareness of your own heartbeat.

A time you might use it: When you’re lying awake in an unfamiliar house, alone late at night, with only the ambient creaking of the floorboards and your own heartbeat to hold back the tide of total silence.

4. Anecdoche

The definition: A conversation in where everyone is talking but nobody is actually listening.

A time you might use it: A dinner out with friends after the meal where everyone’s had one or two drinks, and everyone is trying to tell a story, in which the cacophony of voices results in nobody being heard in their excitement to be.

5. Monachopsis

The definition: The subtle yet nagging feeling of being out of place, not fitting in, knowing that the place you belong is not where you are.

A time you might use it: When your friend drags you to a party where you don’t know anyone and you spend the whole night nursing a drink on the couch watching everyone else have fun. Or the feeling when you move somewhere new and don’t have any friends yet, and spend your time either lonely or among people you don’t like just for the sake of being around someone.

6. Liberosis

The definition: The desire to care less.

A time you might use it: When a persistently stressful situation has been gripping and worrying you for a long time, and you want only to be able to let go yet find yourself unable.

7. Dysania

The definition: The state of struggling to get out of bed in the morning.

A time you might use it: When you promised yourself you’d go to bed at a reasonable time and instead stayed up until you heard birds outside, and now the blaring alarm next to your bed is almost physically painful as you lift your heavy chest from the mattress.

8. Sonder

The definition: The realization that every person around you has a life and history just as rich, interesting, difficult, and unique as your own.

A time you might use it: When you pass a lone pair of headlights on a back road late at night, when you see a family preparing to eat dinner through a window as you walk on the street, when you see the red eyes and tear streaked mascara of the cashier as she tries to give you her best smile and hands you a receipt with shaking hands.

Cover Image Credit: Free Stock Photos

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To The Parent Who Chose Addiction

Thank you for giving me a stronger bond with our family.

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When I was younger I resented you, I hated every ounce of you, and I used to question why God would give me a parent like you. Not now. Now I see the beauty and the blessings behind having an addict for a parent. If you're reading this, it isn't meant to hurt you, but rather to thank you.

Thank you for choosing your addiction over me.

Throughout my life, you have always chosen the addiction over my programs, my swim meets or even a simple movie night. You joke about it now or act as if I never questioned if you would wake up the next morning from your pill and alcohol-induced sleep, but I thank you for this. I thank you because I gained a relationship with God. The amount of time I spent praying for you strengthened our relationship in ways I could never explain.

SEE ALSO: They're Not Junkies, You're Just Uneducated

Thank you for giving me a stronger bond with our family.

The amount of hurt and disappointment our family has gone through has brought us closer together. I have a relationship with Nanny and Pop that would never be as strong as it is today if you had been in the picture from day one. That in itself is a blessing.

Thank you for showing me how to love.

From your absence, I have learned how to love unconditionally. I want you to know that even though you weren't here, I love you most of all. No matter the amount of heartbreak, tears, and pain I've felt, you will always be my greatest love.

Thank you for making me strong.

Thank you for leaving and for showing me how to be independent. From you, I have learned that I do not need anyone else to prove to me that I am worthy of being loved. From you, I have learned that life is always hard, but you shouldn't give into the things that make you feel good for a short while, but should search for the real happiness in life.

Most of all, thank you for showing me how to turn my hurt into motivation.

I have learned that the cycle of addiction is not something that will continue into my life. You have hurt me more than anyone, but through that hurt, I have pushed myself to become the best version of myself.

Thank you for choosing the addiction over me because you've made me stronger, wiser, and loving than I ever could've been before.

Cover Image Credit: http://crashingintolove.tumblr.com/post/62246881826/pieffysessanta-tumblr-com

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Dear Nancy Pelosi, 16-Year-Olds Should Not Be Able To Vote

Because I'm sure every sixteen year old wants to be rushing to the voting booth on their birthday instead of the BMV, anyways.

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Recent politicians such as Nancy Pelosi have put the voting age on the political agenda in the past few weeks. In doing so, some are advocating for the voting age in the United States to be lowered from eighteen to sixteen- Here's why it is ludicrous.

According to a study done by "Circle" regarding voter turnout in the 2018 midterms, 31% of eligible people between the ages of 18 and 29 voted. Thus, nowhere near half of the eligible voters between 18 and 29 actually voted. To anyone who thinks the voting age should be lowered to sixteen, in relevance to the data, it is pointless. If the combination of people who can vote from the legal voting age of eighteen to eleven years later is solely 31%, it is doubtful that many sixteen-year-olds would exercise their right to vote. To go through such a tedious process of amending the Constitution to change the voting age by two years when the evidence doesn't support that many sixteen-year-olds would make use of the new change (assuming it would pass) to vote is idiotic.

The argument can be made that if someone can operate heavy machinery (I.e. drive a car) at sixteen, they should be able to vote. Just because a sixteen-year-old can (in most places) now drive a car and work at a job, does not mean that they should be able to vote. At the age of sixteen, many students have not had fundamental classes such as government or economics to fully understand the political world. Sadly, going into these classes there are students that had mere knowledge of simple political knowledge such as the number of branches of government. Well, there are people above the age of eighteen who are uneducated but they can still vote, so what does it matter if sixteen-year-olds don't know everything about politics and still vote? At least they're voting. Although this is true, it's highly doubtful that someone who is past the age of eighteen, is uninformed about politics, and has to work on election day will care that much to make it to the booths. In contrast, sixteen-year-olds may be excited since it's the first time they can vote, and likely don't have too much of a tight schedule on election day, so they still may vote. The United States does not need people to vote if their votes are going to be uneducated.

But there are some sixteen-year-olds who are educated on issues and want to vote, so that's unfair to them. Well, there are other ways to participate in government besides voting. If a sixteen-year-old feels passionate about something on the political agenda but can't vote, there are other ways of getting involved. They can canvas for politicians whom they agree with, or become active in the notorious "Get Out The Vote" campaign to increase registered voter participation or help register those who already aren't. Best yet, they can politically socialize their peers with political information so that when the time comes for all of them to be eighteen and vote, more eighteen-year-olds will be educated and likely to vote.

If you're a sixteen-year-old and feel hopeless, you're not. As the 2016 election cycle approached, I was seventeen and felt useless because I had no vote. Although voting is arguably one of the easiest ways to participate in politics, it's not the only one. Since the majority of the current young adult population don't exercise their right to vote, helping inform them of how to stay informed and why voting is important, in my eyes is as essential as voting.

Sorry, Speaker Pelosi and all the others who think the voting age should be lowered. I'd rather not have to pay a plethora of taxes in my later years because in 2020 sixteen-year-olds act like sheep and blindly vote for people like Bernie Sanders who support the free college.

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