7 Reasons Why Literature Is So Important

7 Reasons Why Literature Is So Important

"Literature Is One Of The Most Interesting And Significant Expressions Of Humanity." -P. T. Barnum
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Today, there are too many people who believe that literature is simply not important or underestimate its abilities to stand the test of time and give us great knowledge. There is a stigma in society that implies one who is more inclined toward science and math will somehow be more successful in life, and that one who is more passionate toward literature and other art forms will be destined to a life of low-paying jobs and unsatisfying careers. Somewhere along the line, the world has come to think that literature is insignificant. To me, however, literature serves as a gateway to learning of the past and expanding my knowledge and understanding of the world. Here are just a few reasons why literature is important.

1. Expanding horizons

First and foremost, literature opens our eyes and makes us see more than just what the front door shows. It helps us realize the wide world outside, surrounding us. With this, we begin to learn, ask questions, and build our intuitions and instincts. We expand our minds.

2. Building critical thinking skills

Many of us learn what critical thinking is in our language arts classes. When we read, we learn to look between the lines. We are taught to find symbols, make connections, find themes, learn about characters. Reading expands these skills, and we begin to look at a sentence with a larger sense of detail and depth and realize the importance of hidden meanings so that we may come to a conclusion.

3. A leap into the past

History and literature are entwined with each other. History is not just about power struggles, wars, names, and dates. It is about people who are products of their time, with their own lives. Today the world is nothing like it was in the 15th century; people have changed largely. Without literature, we would not know about our past, our families, the people who came before and walked on the same ground as us.

4. Appreciation for other cultures and beliefs

Reading about history, anthropology, or religious studies provides a method of learning about cultures and beliefs other than our own. It allows you to understand and experience these other systems of living and other worlds. We get a view of the inside looking out, a personal view and insight into the minds and reasoning of someone else. We can learn, understand, and appreciate it.

5. Better writing skills

When you open a book, when your eyes read the words and you take in its contents, do you ask yourself: How did this person imagine and write this? Well, many of those authors, poets, or playwrights used literature to expand their writing.

6. Addressing humanity

All literature, whether it be poems, essays, novels, or short stories, helps us address human nature and conditions which affect all people. These may be the need for growth, doubts and fears of success and failure, the need for friends and family, the goodness of compassion and empathy, trust, or the realization of imperfection. We learn that imperfection is not always bad and that normal can be boring. We learn that life must be lived to the fullest. We need literature in order to connect with our own humanity.

Literature is important and necessary. It provides growth, strengthens our minds and gives us the ability to think outside the box.

Cover Image Credit: google.com/images

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35 Major Life Facts According To Nick Miller

"All booze is good booze, unless it's weak booze."
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Fact: If you watch "New Girl," you love Nick Miller.

You can't help it. He's an adorable, lovable mess of a man and you look forward to seeing him and his shenanigans each week. While living the infamous and incomparable life of Nick Miller, and obviously Julius Pepperwood— he has learned many valuable laws of the land. And, although Nick refuses to learn anything from anyone besides his mysterious, old Asian friend Tran, he does have a few lessons he'd like to teach us.

Here are 35 facts of life according to 'Nick Milla Nick Milla':

1. Drinking keeps you healthy.

"I'm not gonna get sick. No germ can live in a body that is 65% beer."

2. Dinosaurs never existed.

"I don't believe dinosaurs existed. I've seen the science. I don't believe it."


3. A paper bag is a bank.

"A bank is just a paper bag but with fancier walls."


4. Having sex is similar to delivering mail.

"I'm like a mailman, except instead of mail it's hot sex that I deliver."

5. Moonwalking is a foolproof way to get out of any awkward situation.

Jess (about Nick): "Now he won't even talk to me. I saw him this morning and he just panic moonwalked away from me. He does that sometimes."

6. Using a movie reference is also a great way.

Cece: "Come on, get up!"

Nick: "No, I don't dance. I'm from that town in "Footloose."

7. There's no reason to wash towels.

Nick: "I don’t wash the towel. The towel washes me. Who washes a towel?"

Schmidt: "You never wash your towel?"

Nick: "What am I gonna do? Wash the shower next? Wash a bar of soap?"

8. Exes are meant to be avoided at all costs (especially if/unless they're Caroline)

"I don't deal with exes, they're part of the past. You burn them swiftly and you give their ashes to Poseidon."

9. IKEA furniture is not as intimidating as it looks.

"I'm building you the dresser. I love this stuff. It's like high-stakes LEGOs."

10. You don't need forks if you have hands.

Jess: "That's gross. Get a fork, man."

Nick: "I got two perfectly good forks at the end of my arms!"

11. Sex has a very specific definition.


"It's not sex until you put the straw in the coconut."

12. Doors are frustrating.

"I will push if I want to push! Come on! I hate doors!"

13. All booze is good booze.

"Can I get an alcohol?"

14. ...unless it's weak booze.

"Schmidt, that is melon flavored liquor! That is 4-proof! That is safe to drink while you're pregnant!"

15. Writers are like pregnant women.

Jess: "You know what that sound is? It's the sound of an empty uterus."

Nick: "I can top that easily. I'm having a hard time with my zombie novel."

Jess: "Are you really comparing a zombie novel to my ability to create life?"

Nick: "I'm a writer, Jess. We create life."

16. All bets must be honored.

"There is something serious I have to tell you about the future. The name of my first-born child needs to be Reginald VelJohnson. I lost a bet to Schmidt."

17. Adele's voice is like a combination of Fergie and Jesus.

"Adele is amazing."

18. Beyoncé is extremely trustworthy.

"I'd trust Beyoncé with my life. We be all night."

19. Fish, on the other hand, are not.


“Absolutely not. You know I don’t trust fish! They breathe water. That's crazy!"

20. Bar mitzvahs are terrifying.

Schmidt: "It's a bar mitzvah!"

Nick: "I am NOT watching a kid get circumcised!"

21. ...so are blueberries.

Jess: "So far, Nick Miller's list of fears is sharks, tap water, real relationships..."

Nick: "And blueberries."

22. Take your time with difficult decisions. Don't be rash.


Jess: "You care about your burritos more than my children, Nick?"

Nick: "You're putting me in a tough spot!"

23. Getting into shape is not easy.

"I mean, I’m not doing squats or anything. I’m trying to eat less donuts."

24. We aren't meant to talk about our feelings.

"If we needed to talk about feelings, they would be called talkings."


25. We're all a little bit too hard on ourselves.

"The enemy is the inner me."

26. Freezing your underwear is a good way to cool off.


"Trust me, I'm wearing frozen underpants right now and I feel amazing. I'm gonna grab some old underpants and put a pair into the freezer for each of you."

27. Public nudity is normal.

"Everbody has been flashed countless times."

28. Alcohol is a cure-all.


"You treat an outside wound with rubbing alcohol. You treat an inside wound with drinking alcohol."

29. Horses are aliens.

"I believe horses are from outer-space."


30. Turtles should actually be called 'shell-beavers.'

Jess: "He calls turtles 'shell-beavers."

Nick: "Well, that's what they should be called."

31. Trench coats are hot.


"This coat has clean lines and pockets that don't quit, and it has room for your hips. And, when I wear it, I feel hot to trot!"


32. Sparkles are too.

"Now, my final bit of advice, and don't get sensitive on this, but you've got to change that top it's terrible and you've got to throw sparkles on. Sparkles are in. SPARKLES ARE IN."

33. Introspection can lead to a deeper knowing of oneself.

"I'm not convinced I know how to read. I've just memorized a lot of words."


34. It's important to live in the moment.

"I know this isn't gonna end well but the middle part is gonna be awesome."


35. Drinking makes you cooler.

Jess: "Drinking to be cool, Nick? That's not a real thing."

Nick: "That's the only thing in the world I know to be true."

Cover Image Credit: Hollywood Reporter

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Surprise! High Fantasy Books Aren't Just For Kids And Middle-Aged Men

How cool are fantasy authors for literally making worlds out of nothing? Super cool, that's what!

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I'm a 21-year-old female, and I love reading fantasy books. My favorite color is pink, and I am a psychology major. You read that right... you can stop stereotyping fantasy readers now.

Over time, it seems that high fantasy novels (fantasy books that have their own unique world that is completely separate from our own) have gotten a reputation of appealing to middle-aged men that live with their parents and can't hold down a job... but that's bull crap.

High fantasy series such as Harry Potter and A Song of Ice and Fire (aka A Game of Thrones) have slowly started helping to break that stereotype. Harry Potter shows kids that fantasy is cool, and A Game of Thrones brings fantasy to the small screen and lures millions of viewers.

It's a great start, but there is still a lack in diversity of fantasy readers. So many people are deterred because of the length of fantasy novels (and series), the complicated worlds, or the weird names. Nonsense!

Length: Look at it this way -- if you are enjoying a book, don't you want more material to get to know the world and characters more?

Complicated worlds: Imagining new worlds can be difficult, but it's a lot of fun to see a world in your own unique way based on what the authors write. Also, how cool are authors for literally making worlds out of nothing? Super cool, that's what!

Weird names: Yeah, I honestly wonder if some authors just put random letters together and go with it. But sometimes the odd names actually have cool meanings to them. For instance, J.K. Rowling's names often come from Latin words or old names that correspond to who the characters are and their traits.

Basically, no matter who you are or what your normal reading tastes are, I think giving fantasy books a try is totally worth it! And if you think reading in general isn't your thing, maybe it's because you haven't tried the fantasy genre out yet.

Here are some recommendations based on personal experience and stellar reviews:

1. The Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson

https://www.goodreads.com/book/photo/12968705-the-final-empire

Brandon Sanderson is my personal favorite fantasy author, and I think this trilogy is the best place to start. Involving an eclectic crew trying to perform a heist to take over the Lord Ruler, this book has one of the best magic systems I've ever read, using the ingestion of metals to get powers.

2. The Kingkiller Chronicles Trilogy by Patrick Rothfuss

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2495567.The_Name_of_the_Wind

THE. WRITING. If you're still weary of fantasy, I think this may be a good start. The poetic writing and characterization in this novel are some of the best I've seen throughout any genre.

3. Song of Ice And Fire series by George R. R. Martin

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/11264999-a-game-of-thrones

A lot of people complain that fantasy novels are hard to understand, and I get that. That's why, if you've watched this show, I'd recommend reading it, too. You already know the world well, so you won't be as confused when you read about the set-up. Also, there's a lot more internal dialogue by the characters in the book, so get to know your faves better by reading the books!

4. Shades of Magic Trilogy by V.E. Schwab

https://www.goodreads.com/book/photo/22055262-a-darker-shade-of-magic

This book series plays with alternative worlds and world jumping. I've never read this series, but I haven't heard any negative reviews about it!

5. Gentleman Bastard Series by Scott Lynch

https://www.goodreads.com/book/photo/29588376-the-lies-of-locke-lamora

In this book, we follow young thief Locke Lamora that has a questionable past and a gray mindset -- always a good set-up for a fantasy. Plus George R. R. Martin and Patrick Rothfuss blurbed it, so there's that.

6. The Broken Earth Trilogy by N. K. Jemisin

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/19161852-the-fifth-season?ac=1&from_search=true

A lot of people complain that fantasy is written by old white men. Well, here's one that isn't! N.K. Jemisin is a fantastic female fantasy author with three Hugos, a Nebula Award, two Locus Awards, and a number of other honors under her belt! This one is high on my list of to-reads!

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