50 Christian Songs That You Need To Add To Your Playlist Right Now

50 Christian Songs That You Need To Add To Your Playlist Right Now

Praise the Lord!

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Ever since I went to my first mission trip I have been obsessed with listening to Christian/worship songs on a daily basis. Personally, they can make my day so much better and can fill my heart with so much love. However, it was only recently that I really started to listen to it more often. With college being so stressful I really treasure when I can take a moment out of my day, to listen to a couple songs on my playlist. With faith being so prominent in my life it is always such a great reminder that God is right there with me, even when it doesn't feel like it sometimes.

Below are some of my favorite songs that I have LOVED over the past four years!

1. Set a Fire - Will Reagan

2. Since Your Love (Live) [feat. Brandon Hampton] - United Pursuit

3. Good Good Father - Chris Tomlin

4. Oceans (Where Feet May Fail) - Hillsong United

5. Lord, I Need You - Matt Maher

6. 10,000 Reasons (Bless The Lord) [Radio Version] - Matt Redman 

7. All The Poor and Powerless - All Sons and Daughters 

8. All Who Are Thirsty - Kutless

9. Amazing Grace (My Chains Are Gone) - Chris Tomlin

10. Christ Is Risen - Matt Maher 

11. Cornerstone - Hillsong Worship

12. Here I am To Worship - Hillsong Worship

13. Holy Spirit - Francesca Battistelli 

14. How Deep The Fathers Love (feat. Heather Evans) - Joshua Miller  

15. How Great Thou Art - Chris Rice 

16. In Christ Alone - Anthem Lights 

17. Hallelujah (Your Love Is Amazing) - Brenton Brown 

18. Light The Fire - The ZOE Group 

19. Our God - Chris Tomlin

20. Take My Life - Live: Passion, Chris Tomlin

21. Tremble (Studio Version) - Mosaic MSC

22. O Praise The Name (Anastasis) - Live: Hillsong Worship

23. I Ran out of That Grave - BeDoTell

24. Who You Say I Am - Studio Version: Hillsong Worship

25. Your Love Awakens Me - Phil Wickman 

26. Resurrecting (Live) - Elevation Worship

27. You Say - Laren Daigle 

28. Still Rolling Stones - Laren Daigle 

29. What A Beautiful Name - Hillsong Worship 

30. Speak - Bethany Music 

This is produced by my church here in Baton Rouge!!!

31. Loud (Live) - Bethany Music 

32. Heaven Open - Bethany Music 

33. Defender (Live) - UPPERROOM 

34. Ever Be (Live) - Bethel Music 

35. Peace Be Still (feat. Laren Daigle) - The Belonging Co

36. Nothing Else - Cody Carnes

37. Shadows - Live: Passion

38. Simplicity - Rend Collective 

39. Look Up Child - Laren Daigle 

40. Build My Life - Housefires 

41. Revelation Song - Christ For The Nations Music 

42. Forever Reign - Live: Hillsong Worship 

43. Desert Song - Live in Australia/2009: Hillsong UNITED 

44. This I Believe (The Creed) - Live: Hillsong Worship 

45. Blessed Be Your Name - Shane & Shane 

46. This Is Amazing Grace - Phil Wickman 

47. Beautiful One - Klaus 

48. Whole Heart (Hold Me Now) - Live: Hillsong UNITED 

49.Till I Found You - Phil Wickman 

50. Even Then - Micah Tyler 

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My Respect For The Searching Pagan

A tribute to belief.

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One of my professors enjoys saying, with emphasis and a smirk: "People make their gods."

"You make your gods up in your heads. You fashion them yourselves."

Would it help anything for me to disagree? I could never fashion God. He fashions me.

It's an African-American literature class, so the poetry and prose often touch on African heritage and tribal gods and so forth.

And so tribal masks and stick idols are talked about with reverence and a scholarly tone but with an air of above-ness. I don't quite know how to describe it. It's like someone talking above a guinea pig cage, praising the guinea pig habits and culture and their "guinea pig-ness," but obviously speaking as their superior. They are a study subject, a specimen, not an equal. She belittles their belief, in everything she doesn't say and in her frequent line.

And I find myself taking the side — the side of the tribes!

Her arrogant unbelief, her belief in herself, is staggering, and she pats herself on the back by, in no uncertain words, equating the son of God, Jesus Christ, with some crude sculptures.

(I am sorry if this turns into too much of a rant. I am called to love this professor and pray for her good, not to be sinfully angry with her!)

I respect the pagans for their belief, their wild longing. They knew that there is something more than the materials they saw, or they longed deeply for the "something else." They worshipped something outside of or beyond themselves.

Atheists, they worship at the altar of self.

I pity the pagans, for they worshipped what they did not know and yet what they created with their own hands. They bowed to dirt and dust, to nothing. But I hold a respect for them, for their wild longing and leap, for their acknowledgment that we are made to worship, for their dancing expression of longing and hope, for their search.

They are a million miles closer to the truth, to beauty, in their native ignorance of Christ, than this professor who looks upon the crucifixion with amusement.

If only she could let the possibility of truth pierce her hide, if only she could walk down from her intellectual pedestal, to worship at the baby's manger, at the humble, horrifying cross. I want more than anything, that her eyes may see and eyes may hear.

If only she could look on Jesus, not as a specimen, but as her Savior.

I pray for the day! In the meantime, she teaches me ever more about the startling beauty of humility and about the incredible limits of the intellect. Rationalization and education are a load of crap if they lead us up into the dungeons of pride.

The soul of the unbeliever, of the atheist, is more chained and poisoned and broken than that of any human slave who ever lived in the freedom of Christ.

We come upon a lot of hard questions in literature, some hard morsels that will knot your stomach. Like there's this slicing fact that the salvation of many people into God's kingdom (and out of paganism) came by the way of kidnapping and brutal slavery.

Many of the African-American poems talk about the cost, the high cost of knowing Jesus. Many Africans paid the great cost of slavery in finding Jesus. Was it worth it?

Not if you think Christianity is merely soul comfort. Not if you think it just provides structure and purpose. Not if you think it's just a constraining religion or just one of many ways to God.

Jesus Christ is the Way, the Truth, and the Life. And to those who believe, yes, He is worth everything, though His ways are beyond our understanding.

Christ is not a God for white people alone! What a joke. He came 'first for the Jew, and then for the Gentile.'

Jesus reaches out to every nation, to every pagan, every atheist. He reaches out a loving hand to all men, none excluded, asking them to feast around the fire, to know Him and forsake their sin.

A relationship with Jesus makes joy central, and suffering, no matter how great, peripheral, in this life. For we know the end of our stories (and their real beginnings) will be glorious and good: redeemed. This harsh world of our sight is not all there is.

Christ is the hope of all nations, a healing balm for the bitter cynic, and the fulfillment of longing for the pagan.

Through the tribal fire, through the haze of death and the burning horror, through the pains of great wickedness, our perfect God reaches out a hand to those who run from Him. He offers love, He offers His one and only Son, bearing our sin on a cross. No one could have made this up, this radical, forgiving love.

"For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life." — John 3:16

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