With only two years left in the New Tens, it might be time to reflect on the passing decade.

For younger millennials, the 2010's were crucial in defining our identity and values. More importantly, though, they were repeatedly put to the test. Obviously, these social challenges aren't limited to millennials - we didn't grow up believing AIDS was a "gay disease" or under the constant fear that Armageddon would rip civilization apart. But, since this is our first decade as adults, there is no doubt that this decade will define how we interact with society for the rest of our lives.

1. We (Kinda) Know How to Use Technology

(At least compared to my parents.) I know that there are several older adults who are tech geniuses, but young adults have made technology an integral part of our lifestyle. While having instant information at our fingertips is liberating and something we take for granted, it honestly can draining. Time that could've been used to read a book or maybe do homework (because you have nothing else better to do) is spent on the Internet or plugging hours into various games on Steam. But, let's face it, it's so much easier to veg out in front of a screen than any other mental activity.

2. We're (More) Socially Aware

And sensitive to certain issues. Looking back on shows produced back in the 90's and 00's, their treatment of societal norms was, for the lack of a better term, insensitive. The plight of the LGBTA community is treated as cheap plot fodder and the butt of every joke (I'm looking at you Malcolm in the Middle). That or they treat women as neurotic and uptight (Ahem, Everybody Loves Raymond). Reflecting on this media and then at the current sociopolitical climate, it's cringe-y to observe.


3. It's Okay To Be Nerdy

Nerd culture is mainstream. I wish this had occurred sooner, honestly. Otherwise, my middle and high school life might've been a little less hellish. But now that everybody watches anime and knows what a meme is, many people who grew up as social misfits in the 2000's can finally feel comfortable in their own skin. I know this isn't the universal consensus, but I hope there are a few people that agree with me. And to those who claim to be nerds since before it was mainstream, I get it. You're bitter. But what good is it to chastise others for having the same interests as you?

There's plenty more to be taken from the last eight years, but this is just the scratch of the surface. What did you take from the 2010's?