16 Derogatory Words Used To Describe Women

16 Derogatory Words Used To Describe Women

Too ambitious? A negative personality trait? That's cause you're a woman.
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Growing up, I was called “too ambitious,” “feisty” and “bossy” by professors, peers and family. These words were thrown at me and lead me to break my determination, extinguish my passion and hinder my ability to lead. I never truly realized the extent of the effect these words had on me until I attended college and learned that I was purposefully holding myself back because of words people described me with, as I was being told me to be less of myself.

The following are just a few among MANY:

1. Airhead, n.

Usually refers to someone, male or female, who is simple-minded and vapid. Now, mainly thanks to the media it’s come to be synonymous with this type of woman, who aspires to dye her hair yellow (If you've read Bossypants you'll understand why I used yellow and not blonde) with extensive knowledge about celebrity life. Uhh dying my hair and having extensive knowledge about Hollywood celebrity life doesn't make me an airhead. #lolnot


2. Ambitious, adj.

Having a strong desire for success. Nothing bad about it right? But when used in accordance to women, being ambitious is not a positive trait but rather one that is frowned upon. Just ask Cara Delevingne and Madonna, two women who have been criticized for being too ambitious. #eyeroll

3. Abrasive, n.

Irritating or causing annoyance. This word is the up and coming term to describe women in powerful positions. Even Forbes conducted a study where they claimed that "abrasive" appeared "17 times in women's professional performance reviews" and only once for men. Contrary to women, men were actually encouraged to be MORE aggressive. #SMH


4. Bossy, adj

A personal favorite of mine. I can't tell you how many times I've been called bossy. While men are called strong-minded and are rarely called bossy, for women it has much less flattering connotation. As Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook claims, "When a little boy asserts himself, he's called a “leader.” Yet when a little girl does the same, she risks being branded “bossy.”

Words like bossy send a message: don't raise your hand or speak up. By middle school, girls are less interested in leading than boys—a trend that continues into adulthood. Together we can encourage girls to lead." #banbossy

5. Bitchy, adj

Oh yes, on top of being bitches, women can also be bitchy, which basically means being 'malicious or snide.' This word is usually associated women in powerful positions, like a female boss or CEO. Men? Nah, He's the boss, he has an excuse for being mean. #doublestandards

6. Bubbly, adj

Excited, glowing, animated! Let me ask you something; when have you ever heard a man referred to as being bubbly? Answer: never. Because we're all pretty fluffy unicorns, always excited and batting our lashes at men. #B****PLEASE

7. Emotional, adj

Emotional is to Woman, as Emotionless is to man. And why is that you ask? Because maleness is associated with the inability to be in touch with your emotions. Here just in, men have emotions, too. The word is supposed to be gender neutral, applicable to both men and women. But its not. Like ever. #dafuu

8. Feisty, adj

We've got another "lively" one. Great. Daisy Lewis, the Downton Abbey actress asks the question that's probably on your mind, "Have you heard a man described as feisty? Have you heard a male character described as feisty? I think not." #raisedeyebrow

9. High-maintenance, adj

If you're a woman and have been called 'high-maintenance' put your hands up! Yes, I'm a woman who loves her manicures, money, traveling and I do have demands. Because cleanliness and having standards and aspirations is a bad thing. Basically, this word is deeply rooted in sexism. #ihavestandards

10. Hormonal, adj.

When have I been called hormonal? Too many times to count. When have I been asked if I'm on my periods? Also countless times. Newsflash, both men and women have hormones, and both can be hormonal. #facts #themoreyouknow

11. Hysterical, adj

Hysterical is derived from the word Hysteria, a condition that only really existed because male doctors were too lazy to delve deeper into the science of the female anatomy. It applies to women today to basically mean irrational. Because men can't be irrational *cough cough* TRUMP. #SCOFF

12. Illogical, adj and Irrational, adj

Feelings = men and women. Men and women. Expressing too many feelings equals illogical/ irrational. How does that even make sense? Once again, the world should be reminded, that men too have emotions, men too can be illogical and men too can be irrational. See Hysterical. #PFF

13. Sassy, adj.

I don't like this word. First of all, it's linked to gender, sexuality, and race. It reduces people to stereotypes and is almost never applied to heterosexual men. Also, why does a strong woman have to be sassy? And why can't a straight man be sassy? #WHYUNOBESASSYMEN

14. Voluptuous, adj.

When have we ever called a man voluptuous? Answer; never. We call women voluptuous and curvy because the word has sexual undertones. I said I was a woman not a sexual object #knowyourwords


15. Whining, v.

When a woman complains, she's whining. When a man complains, he's... well just complaining. Which one's worse. Ding, ding ding! 'Whining' is the correct answer! #facepalm

16. Working Mom n.

Why does the word "working" have to be separate from mom. We don't say "working dad". If you ask me, it's a derogatory description of the word mom, basically saying that being a mom and being a working mom are two different things. They're not! #upliftourmoms

Cover Image Credit: PEXELS

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This Is How Your Same-Sex Marriage Affects Me As A Catholic Woman

I hear you over there, Bible Bob.
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It won't.

Wait, what?

I promise you did read that right. Not what you were expecting me to say, right? Who another person decides to marry will never in any way affect my own marriage whatsoever. Unless they try to marry the person that I want to, then we might have a few problems.

As a kid, I was raised, baptized, and confirmed into an old school Irish Catholic church in the middle of a small, midwestern town.

Not exactly a place that most people would consider to be very liberal or open-minded. Despite this I was taught to love and accept others as a child, to not cast judgment because the only person fit to judge was God. I learned this from my Grandpa, a man whose love of others was only rivaled by his love of sweets and spoiling his grandkids.

While I learned this at an early age, not everyone else in my hometown — or even within my own church — seemed to get the memo. When same-sex marriage was finally legalized country-wide, I cried tears of joy for some of my closest friends who happen to be members of the LGBTQ community.

I was happy while others I knew were disgusted and even enraged.

"That's not what it says in the bible! Marriage is between a man and a woman!"

"God made Adam and Eve for a reason! Man shall not lie with another man as he would a woman!"

"Homosexuality is a sin! It's bad enough that they're all going to hell, now we're letting them marry?"

Alright, Bible Bob, we get it, you don't agree with same-sex relationships. Honestly, that's not the issue. One of our civil liberties as United States citizens is the freedom of religion. If you believe your religion doesn't support homosexuality that's OK.

What isn't OK is thinking that your religious beliefs should dictate others lives.

What isn't OK is using your religion or your beliefs to take away rights from those who chose to live their life differently than you.

Some members of my church are still convinced that their marriage now means less because people are free to marry whoever they want to. Honestly, I wish I was kidding. Tell me again, Brenda how exactly do Steve and Jason's marriage affect yours and Tom's?

It doesn't. Really, it doesn't affect you at all.

Unless Tom suddenly starts having an affair with Steve their marriage has zero effect on you. You never know Brenda, you and Jason might become best friends by the end of the divorce. (And in that case, Brenda and Tom both need to go to church considering the bible also teaches against adultery and divorce.)

I'll say it one more time for the people in the back: same-sex marriage does not affect you even if you or your religion does not support it. If you don't agree with same-sex marriage then do not marry someone of the same sex. Really, it's a simple concept.

It amazes me that I still actually have to discuss this with some people in 2017. And it amazes me that people use God as a reason to hinder the lives of others.

As a proud young Catholic woman, I wholeheartedly support the LGBTQ community with my entire being.

My God taught me to not hold hate so close to my heart. He told me not to judge and to accept others with open arms. My God taught me to love and I hope yours teaches you the same.

Disclaimer - This article in no way is meant to be an insult to the Bible or religion or the LGBTQ community.

Cover Image Credit: Sushiesque / Flickr

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A Florida House Committee Is Undermining Your Vote On Amendment 4

Before felons can regain their right to vote, they must pay court fines, fees, and take care of any other "financial obligations." Essentially, this is a poll tax.

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Amendment 4, also known as the Voting Rights Restoration for Felons Initiative, was added to the Constitution of Florida after being passed this last midterm election on November 6, 2018.

Amendment 4 restored the voting rights of Floridians with prior felony convictions after all terms of their sentence have been met, including parole and probation. This amendment only applies to felons who have not been convicted of murder or sexual offenses.

On January 8, 2019, an estimated 1.4 million ex-felons regained their right to vote. This is monumental. Prior to this amendment, Florida was one of four states that used felony disenfranchisement. Amendment 4 gives voice, and rightfully so, to felons who have served their time. Amendment 4 is also putting to rest, finally, years and years of disenfranchisement and suppression.

Now, only two months after its passage, the House Criminal Justice Committee is trying to water down this piece of legislation. This is a direct violation of the will of the 64% of Floridians who voted for the legislation as is. This amendment was not to be "clarified," as Governor DeSantis put it, but rather to be self-implementing.

However, the House Criminal Justice Committee proposed a bill that would tack on some extra qualifiers in order for felons to be enfranchised. The bill will require court fines, fees, and other "financial obligations" (in addition to fees administered in a judge's sentence) to be paid in full before a felon's voting rights are restored. This seems awfully similar to a poll tax to me. Obviously, this is going to affect people without a lot of resources rather than white-collar criminals who can afford a $500,000 bond.

This new qualifier will prevent felons from voting based on the money that can be coughed up as if they don't have to worry about their finances long after they leave prison.

Some may argue that these felons shouldn't have committed a crime in the first place. However, I would argue that holding a felon's vote hostage on the basis of money is unconstitutional.

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