15 Ways To Tell You Found Your College Best Friend

15 Ways To Tell You Found Your College Best Friend

She is a special breed of best friend.
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Throughout the stages of life, I’ve had many different “best” friends and I am sure most people have too.

There is the one best friend your tiny kindergarten self-picked because she had pretty crayons. She is always your “day one" on Instagram, but really you get lunch maybe once a year.

Then there are the middle school best friends. There seem to be a million of them, who probably have never had a valuable conversation with, but you had a lot of pictures with them at the middle school dances, so it counts.

Then it's high school best friends, the best friends that teach you about growing up and being yourself (or fake self).

And then comes the point where you either got really blessed and keep the friends or move on with life once freshman year of college hits.

Sometimes, the lucky ones keep the same friends from kindergarten until senior year, but then a whole new beast comes around: college.

Your college best friend is her own separate entity.

She is the one you handpicked.

The one you saw sitting in the dining hall and thought, “Wow, she is cool. I like her.” Then, you stalked on Twitter and thought, “She won’t ever be my friend.” But here we are now and she is your best friend. It seemed pretty magical how it all worked out.

Some people find this person at orientation; others find this person first-semester junior year. Either way, when you find her you’ll know you found your college best friend, mostly because of these signs:

1. She lets you in her bed even though she hates when people touch her.


Basically, you annoy her 24/7 asking her to cuddle and she agrees to it eventually.


2. She encourages you to eat chocolate on your best days and your worst.

It is more for her sake than yours, but you both ignore that.

3. She is your number one fan.

25 percent of her tweets are probably about something semi-cool you did. The other 75 percent is probably about something embarrassing you did.

4. She is always up for adventure.

By adventure, I mean running to Target for 6 hours when you just need more chocolate, but then you come out with new shoes, candles and an array of make-up.

5. She keeps you up super late.


Or you keep her up. You aren't really sure. Either way, somehow you stay up until 2 a.m. chatting about unimportant things.


6. She makes you laugh at the most inappropriate of times.


Most notable time: the class you signed up to take together.

7. She can read your mind.


The look says it all.

8. She lets you have the good shower.

Communal bathrooms are rough, so naturally, you shower at the same time (in different showers) so you can chat through the gross experience. Your saint of a best friend lets you have the least gross of the two because she is sent from heaven.

9. She may have a boyfriend, but you two are dating.

By this point, you have just accepted your life as a third wheel.

10. She may not have known you for long, but you both are completely yourself around each other.

You probably dance around weirdly together 90 percent of the day.

11. She does that annoying hug thing. Even if you went 2 weeks without seeing each other.

Yeah, you are those people you make fun of. It happens.

12. She understands your weird quirks and probably has even weirder ones.

Weird Snapchats and all.

13. She fights with you like a five-year-old.

Because your fights aren't actually about anything important.

14. She will be there for you at 2 a.m. or 2 p.m.

Always there with a hug, tissues and a snarky remark about how your mascara is running and how ugly you look because of that.

15. At the end of it all, she is your soulmate and you really just can't explain why.

You just know that she can't ever get rid of you.

Cover Image Credit: Jessica Lynk

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Jason Kulpa, San Diego CEO and Founder of Jason Kulpa Wife Scholarship, Reveals 3 Smart Ways to Tame the High Cost of College

The cost of college is going nowhere but up, but you do not have to succumb to all that debt.

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If you are worried about the high cost of higher education, you are not alone. With the cost of college tuition going nowhere but up and financial aid holding steady or going down, even middle- and upper-class parents often worry that they will not be able to make their dreams of a college education for their children come true.

No matter who you are or where you live, the cost of a college education keeps going up. If you want to help your son or daughter graduate without crippling college loan debt, you need to think out of the box and look for creative ways to tame the high cost of a college education.

Apart from applying to scholarships to fund higher education, such as the Jason Kulpa Wife Scholarship (learn more at www.jasonkulpawife.com), there are three strategies you can use to reduce the cost of college without sacrificing the education your child needs and deserves.

1. Use Tuition Assistance to Enhance Your Career at Virtually No Cost

Even in today's high-cost college environment, there is a way to get an excellent education and do it at virtually no cost. This path may take longer, but the thought of graduating from college with a stable full-time income and no debt whatsoever is undoubtedly an attractive one.

There is something to be said for entering the workforce right after high school, and a growing number of young people are considering this option. Many employers offer tuition assistance to even entry-level workers and going to college part time while working full time is more feasible than ever, thanks to the widespread availability of online learning and virtual college courses.

If you take this approach, you could graduate with marketable skills your current employer will appreciate, setting you up for future promotions and a higher salary. Best of all, the cost of that education could be negligible, putting you on a sound financial footing and helping you enjoy even greater success while your peers are struggling with college debt.

2. Take Advantage of Work/Study Opportunities

Working your way through school does not necessarily mean delivering pizzas on the weekend or tending bar in the evenings. Many colleges provide work/study opportunities for their students, giving young people the chance to earn a living while securing their future education.

Some of these work/study opportunities are limited a single field of education, while others are open to all. If you are looking for a way to avoid college loan debt, you owe it to yourself to check out these work/study opportunities and take advantage of them when you can.

3. Start with a Community College Education

Compared to the cost of a four-year college or university, the price of community college is a real bargain. More and more community colleges are offering courses specifically designed to give budget-conscious learners a head start on the education they need.

Taking your first year or two of education at a community college could save you a ton of money on tuition and room and board. Once you have a solid background in your course of study, you can transfer your community college credits to a four-year school and continue your education without incurring huge college loan debt.

The cost of college is going nowhere but up, but you do not have to succumb to all that debt. If you are willing to think outside the box and take an unorthodox path to higher education, in addition to seeking out and applying for niche scholarships such as the Jason Kulpa Wife Scholarship, you could escape the college loan trap and get a jump start on a great career.

About: The Jason Kulpa Wife Scholarship is just one of several investments Jason Kulpa has pledged to his community. Jason Kulpa founded San Diego based UE.co in 2008 after holding operations positions at a number of fast-growing Ad-Tech companies. Since becoming CEO, he has taken a hands-on approach to driving strategic partnerships and creating a company culture that promotes innovation and respect for high-level vision. Mr. Kulpa graduated from the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

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No, A Colored Student Did Not 'Steal Your Spot,' They Worked Hard To Get Here

I keep hearing this ignorant question of, "How come illegal immigrants can get scholarships, but I can't?"

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Real talk, this whole "they're stealing our resources!" thing has to stop.

It ranges from welfare to acceptance letters into prestigious universities. People (and by people, I'm referring to those who identify as white) have made the assumption that they are having their opportunities stolen by people of color. That's ridiculous.

I love my university. I love the people at my university. However, when I sit in a classroom and look around at my colleagues, the majority of them are white. Of course, there are some classes that are filled with more people of color, but for the most part, they're predominantly white. So, let's say that out of a classroom of 30 students, only 7 identify as people of color.

In what world can somebody make the argument that those 7 students are stealing the spot of a white student? I don't think people realize how hard those 7 students had to work just to be in the same spot as their white counterparts.

Let me use my experience: I am a Latina woman who is attending university on a full-ride scholarship. I don't always tell people about this, because I don't feel like being asked, "wow, what did you do to get that?!" A lot. I keep hearing this ignorant question of, "How come illegal immigrants can get scholarships, but I can't?"

First off, those "illegal immigrants" you're bashing, don't even qualify for financial aid. They don't qualify for most scholarships, actually. Second, have you considered that maybe, that "illegal immigrant" worked hard in and outside of school to earn their scholarship? I received my full-ride scholarship on the basis of my GPA, but also because I am a lower-class woman of color and was selected because I am disproportionately affected by poverty and access to a quality education.

So, this scholarship was literally created because there is an understanding that minorities don't have the same access to education as our white counterparts. It's not a handout though, I had to work hard to get the money that I have now. When white students get scholarships, it's not a handout but when you're Latina like me, apparently it is.

This way of viewing minorities and their education is damaging, and further discourages these people from receiving a quality education. We didn't steal anybody's spot, we had to work to get where we are, twice as hard as our white colleagues that are not discriminated against on a daily basis.

Instead of tearing down students of color because you didn't get a scholarship, why not criticize the American education system instead? It's not our fault tuition is $40k a year, and we have no reason to apologize for existing in a space that is predominantly white.

To students of color: you worked hard to get where you are, and I am proud of you. To white students: I'm proud of you too. We all worked hard to get to where we are now, let's lift each other up, not put each other down.

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