12 Life Struggles You Only Know If You're Short

12 Life Struggles You Only Know If You're Short

Jeans always need to be cuffed like seven times.
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My mother never made it to five feet tall and my dad isn’t very tall either so I knew I was destined to be short. The day the doctor told me I finally made it to five feet tall was definitely one of the greatest days of my life. With my genetics, I didn’t think the day would come.

Obviously short people are the best (no offense to the tall people in the world). However, despite being the best, we go through a lot of struggles being vertically challenged.

1. When people say, “wow, you’re really short”

I love the people who feel the need to say this. As if I have no idea how tall I am. Really? I’m short? This is news to me.

2. Top-loading washing machines

I absolutely hate top-loading washing machines. I always end up diving in to reach the clothes at the bottom.

3. Trying to reach anything on the top shelf

We short people are masters of climbing on counters, the shelves in grocery stores, and whatever else we need to reach stuff on the top shelves.

4. Trying to see at a general admission concert

I always end up spending the whole night on my tiptoes trying to catch the tiniest glimpse of the band or artist I came to see.

5. Jeans

Even when I buy jeans that are labeled “short” they still bunch up at my ankles. The struggle is real. I always have to cuff my jeans.

6. Meeting height requirements

One day I almost didn’t meet the height requirement to ride the go-karts at a kids play center. The guy stared at me for a second and then asked me if I was able to reach the pedals. My eleven-year-old cousin was tall enough to ride them no questions asked.

7. “Good things come in small packages”

I don’t ever want to hear someone say this to me ever again.

8. Trying to get served at a bar

Bars are crowded and it’s very easy for short people to get lost in a crowd. I feel like I practically need to send up a smoke signal to get the bartenders attention. On the flip side of this, sometimes I think they see me just fine they are just probably thinking, “Why is this 12 year old at a bar?”

9. Drive up ATMs

I actually have to get out of my car to use the ATM. I can’t reach the buttons if I’m sitting in my car.

10. When people think it’s their right to put their arms on your head and lean on you

Do taller people see shorter people and think, “wow I must lean against that short person”. Because I’m pretty sure that’s how it goes down. Word of advice, don't do this to me. It makes mad.

11. Being at armpit-height of everyone on public transportation

As if public transportation doesn’t smell bad enough, we have to smell everyone’s BO along with the general stench of public transport. Being at armpit-height means we also struggle with holding on to the handles that were intended for average sized people.

12. When you sit down and your feet don’t touch the ground

Personally, this is the most embarrassing one. I always feel like I’ve gone from 22 to 12 when my feet don’t reach the ground when I sit down. What’s worse than sitting in a chair that’s too tall? Sitting on one of those abnormally tall toilets and having your feet not touch the ground. Let me tell you, that’s really freaking weird.

Short people struggles are very real. So thank you to all of the tall people in the world who help us out. And to all my short people out there, I hope you continue to be small but mighty.

Cover Image Credit: Unsplash

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​An Open Letter To The People Who Don’t Tip Their Servers

This one's for you.
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Dear Person Who Has No Idea How Much The 0 In The “Tip:" Line Matters,

I want to by asking you a simple question: Why?

Is it because you can't afford it? Is it because you are blind to the fact that the tip you leave is how the waiter/waitress serving you is making their living? Is it because you're just lazy and you “don't feel like it"?

Is it because you think that, while taking care of not only your table but at least three to five others, they took too long bringing you that side of ranch dressing? Or is it just because you're unaware that as a server these people make $2.85 an hour plus TIPS?

The average waiter/waitress is only supposed to be paid $2.13 an hour plus tips according to the U.S. Department of Labor.

That then leaves the waiter/waitress with a paycheck with the numbers **$0.00** and the words “Not a real paycheck." stamped on it. Therefore these men and women completely rely on the tips they make during the week to pay their bills.

So, with that being said, I have a few words for those of you who are ignorant enough to leave without leaving a few dollars in the “tip:" line.

Imagine if you go to work, the night starts off slow, then almost like a bomb went off the entire workplace is chaotic and you can't seem to find a minute to stop and breathe, let alone think about what to do next.

Imagine that you are helping a total of six different groups of people at one time, with each group containing two to 10 people.

Imagine that you are working your ass off to make sure that these customers have the best experience possible. Then you cash them out, you hand them a pen and a receipt, say “Thank you so much! It was a pleasure serving you, have a great day!"

Imagine you walk away to attempt to start one of the 17 other things you need to complete, watch as the group you just thanked leaves, and maybe even wave goodbye.

Imagine you are cleaning up the mess that they have so kindly left behind, you look down at the receipt and realize there's a sad face on the tip line of a $24.83 bill.

Imagine how devastated you feel knowing that you helped these people as much as you could just to have them throw water on the fire you need to complete the night.

Now, realize that whenever you decide not to tip your waitress, this is nine out of 10 times what they go through. I cannot stress enough how important it is for people to realize that this is someone's profession — whether they are a college student, a single mother working their second job of the day, a new dad who needs to pay off the loan he needed to take out to get a safer car for his child, your friend, your mom, your dad, your sister, your brother, you.

If you cannot afford to tip, do not come out to eat. If you cannot afford the three alcoholic drinks you gulped down, plus your food and a tip do not come out to eat.

If you cannot afford the $10 wings that become half-off on Tuesdays plus that water you asked for, do not come out to eat.

If you cannot see that the person in front of you is working their best to accommodate you, while trying to do the same for the other five tables around you, do not come out to eat. If you cannot realize that the man or woman in front of you is a real person, with their own personal lives and problems and that maybe these problems have led them to be the reason they are standing in front of you, then do not come out to eat.

As a server myself, it kills me to see the people around me being deprived of the money that they were supposed to earn. It kills me to see the three dollars you left on a $40 bill. It kills me that you cannot stand to put yourself in our shoes — as if you're better than us. I wonder if you realize that you single-handedly ruined part of our nights.

I wonder if maybe one day you will be in our shoes, and I hope to God no one treats you how you have treated us. But if they do, then maybe you'll realize how we felt when you left no tip after we gave you our time.

Cover Image Credit: Hailea Shallock

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Everyone Should Care About Latinx Issues, Regardless Of Their Own Identities

It's important no matter who you are or where you come from.

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Disclaimer: As someone who is white, I am speaking on a culture that is not my own and which I am not an authority on. Please remember this and do your own research. Reach out to those who do identify as Latinx but as always, respect that it is not the job of any minority population to field all questions and educate.

People often say that no matter how old you get or how much you think you know, you never stop learning. I've always found this to be true but recently I was reminded of just how true it really is. On March 27, Bowling Green State University held their 24th annual Latino/A/X issues conference. I had heard about the conference in passing much earlier in the month and it piqued my interest but admittedly slipped my mind pretty quickly after hearing about it. It wasn't until a friend of mine had informed me that she and another one of our friends were receiving awards at the conference that I finally put it on my calendar.

As I looked through the program at all of the different events scheduled for the day, the first to catch my eye was a theatrical performance called Spanish Ohio: Reflections on loss, gain acceptance and belonging moderated by a Bowling Green professor and friend, Emily Aguliar. I can confidently say that I have not, in a long time felt so confused and lost in a theatrical setting in a long time. The performance was presented in about 90% Spanish and 10% English and having little more than a basic understanding of Spanish from my high school days, I was able to understand a few key words or phrases here and there but more I just found myself intrigued by what I didn't understand...which was a lot. At the end of the performance, there was a sort of Q&A; where we as the audience could ask questions to the performers. During which time an audience member made a comment that really opened my mind.

She had said that it was important for people outside of the Latinx community to be lost in that moment. That the not understanding was what so many people whose first language isn't English feel all the time.

This statement really hit me hard and stuck with me. Even though I was at a performance at my college where I knew that I was safe, secure and taken care of, not knowing what was going on around me was overwhelming and a little unsettling. Not because I fear the existence of languages other than English, but because I felt as if I was expected to understand and take away things that I simply couldn't. And the fact that people move about in the world feeling like this every day in a society where they are not looked after or cared for was a painful but oh so necessary realization.

People are being forced to exist in a place that doesn't make it easy for them to do so. All too often the one piece of 'advice' given to those who speak any language other than English is simply to 'Just speak English' as if it is more important for the majority to feel comfortable and unthreatened by the existence of a language outside of our own than it is to respect the culture, language, and diversity of the Latinx community.

This conference really opened my eyes to the struggles of the Latinx community but at the same time, it highlighted and celebrated the achievements as well. I was lucky enough to be able to see two women who are very important to me receive awards for the work that they've done in and around the community. Both of these women are beyond deserving of the accolades they received. They are passionate, strong, opinionated women with knowledge and heart and I was thankful to be there to witness both of them receiving the recognition that they so deserve. It is SO important to recognize the contributions of people who have been pushed to the sort of outskirts of the conversation so to speak and I can say that it was very moving for me to see my friends as well as the others at the conference reveling in their identities and their cultures.

This is how it should be at all times, not just at a conference.

People should feel comfortable in their identities and people who are in positions of privilege should be using their voices to amplify the marginalized. I am so very thankful to have been able to attend this event and learn and grow in my understanding of culture, identity, and people. So, thank you to BGSU and LSU for putting in the work to make this possible for everyone, and to Emily and Camila-I'm proud of you both! Amplify the marginalized and underrepresented and never stop learning everything you can.

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