10 Job Interview Answers To the Question: "Is There Anything You Would Like To Ask Us?"

10 Job Interview Answers To the Question: "Is There Anything You Would Like To Ask Us?"

How to use this question to interview THEM

40
views

It is usually the final thing you're asked in almost any serious job interview.

"Is there anything you would like to ask us?"

And you've probably been told to always say something at this point, right? But what?

Advice usually ranges along the lines of "just be yourself" to "remember, you're interviewing them just as much as they are interviewing you", but in the thick of the interview, these platitudes are of very little practical use.

In my short but eventful professional life I have spent plenty of hours on both sides of the interview table and I have put together an article that is going to give you a handful of quick-fire options that will apply to almost every interview situation. These questions will help lock in that second round interview but, more importantly, they will give you information you need to know about your potential employer.

1. How's the work/life balance at the compan​y?

Basically a nice way of asking if employees are expected to put in extra hours and, if they are, how many.

This is a crucial bit of information. The value of any salary you are offered can only be properly evaluated when it is compared against the amount of hours you will be putting in.

2. Can I see the area I'd be working in if I get the job?

Many companies will interview at a separate location to where you will end up actually working (for a variety of reasons, sometimes completely legitimate).

Asking for a tour of your potential workplace is a great question for a number of reasons:

  1. It will be perceived as extremely proactive and help you stand out from other candidates
  2. Seeing your work environment will help you gauge how to approach you first day of work, eg: dress code, kitchen facilities etc
  3. It will give you a small snapshot of the conditions (and to a certain extent the culture) of the company.

3. How long have you been with the company?

If the answer to this question is only a handful of months, this could be a red flag.

This is not a definitive guideline, but most companies will try and get someone in the room that is trusted and knows the business well.

If your interviewer is new to the company themselves this might point to staff retention issues.

4. Is this position a new position or am I replacing someone who has left?

This can be a question that tells you a lot about the company.

If it is a new position, this points to growth. In this case, follow up on it by asking about the company's journey over the last 1 to 2 years. A recent history of growth means opportunity, which is a good sign that you will be able to move up in a short period of time.

On the flip side if you are filling a vacant position you should try and find out why it is vacant. Did the previous employee leave the company or were promoted internally. Also try and find out how long they were in the role for. If someone left a position less than 12 months after accepting it, that could be the sign of a bad culture.

5. Does the company have a high turnover rate?

This might sound a little blunt, but if the interviewer is expecting you to walk on eggshells, then this might not be the sort of job you want anyway.

High turnover is almost always the sign of a negative work environment. Whether people are leaving because of stress, work overload, poor processes, unpleasant working relations or anything else, the bottom line is: if no one wants to be there, why would you?

If they give you an non-specific answer to this question, ask something along the lines of: "How long does the typical employee stay with the company before moving on?"

6. How would you describe the company culture?

If you are qualified enough for the role you're likely to get a similar range of offers at the same level. This is what makes company culture such an important aspect. You're going to be spending a minimum of 40 hours a week at this place for the foreseeable future and spend more time with your workmates than most of your friends and family.

Having an insight into company culture is more important than nearly any other information you could get from the interview.

7. What is your favourite thing about working here?

This is a good follow up to the previous question.

Chances are a handful of interviewers will have a canned answer to any question on company culture. If what they are saying feels fake make it specific to them and they'll find it a little harder to dodge the question.

8. What does a typical day entail in my position?

The answer to this question will tell you how focused and professional the company is.

Be wary of answers like: "There really isn't such thing as a typical day in this role". While this might be pitched as a positive or exciting aspect of the job, it could just as easily suggest that you will be walking into an unorganised mess of a position, or that the interviewer doesn't truly understand the position they are trying to fill.

Either way it is bad news, as you're either getting fed to the sharks or potentially joining a workforce full of poorly recruited employees.

9. Is there anything in particular that is giving you reservations about hiring me?

A tactical question more than anything else.

Gives you the chance to address anything that otherwise might go unsaid.

It also gives you the opportunity to show how you deal with constructive criticism and shows a self-awareness in your abilities and desire to improve.

10. Is there any question you feel like I haven't fully answered?

Another tactical question.

Helps you get a second change if you think you've flubbed a question but also helps cut down the reasons you might get cut from any second round process.

After you've left and they are narrowing the field it will be a lot harder to justify filing your resume in the trash can for failing to properly answer a question if you specifically asked if they wanted more.

And one final note:

Always remember you don't want to ask these questions to impress or show you're engaged. Ask them because you want to know the answers. You need to decide if the company is worth your professional effort.

Go in the room and hold them accountable. With this attitude you will seem calm, capable and independent. Doing this is what will really land you the offer.


Popular Right Now

Why I Love The Film '8 Women'

A movie review

379
views

The film is set in the 1950s in a large country residence. As the family comprised of mostly women prepares for Christmas, the 'master' of the house is discovered dead in his bed, with a dagger stuck in his back. The murderer must be one of the eight women in the house at the time, and in the course of the investigations, each has a tale to tell and so many secrets to hide.

The scene opens with Suzon returning from school for Christmas break, finding her mother Gaby, her younger sister Catherine, and her wheelchair-bound grandmother Mamy in the living room, where most of the action of the film takes place. Gaby eventually tells Catherine to go wake up her father Marcel, which is when she finds that her father's been stabbed to death. Attempting to call the authorities, they find that the phone is disconnected, and soon come to the realization that the murderer is either of them As the women begin to question and prod at each other, many secrets come to light: that Louise slept with Marcel, that Chanel loves Pierrette, that Suzon is pregnant, that Suzon is not Marcel's daughter, which is just as well since she is pregnant with his child, that Gaby was about to leave with Marcel's business associate and that Mamy had poisoned her husband a long time ago. The plot concludes with Catherine revealing that Marcel is not dead and that she had plotted everything in order to show her father the truth about "his women". As she opens the door to his bedroom, he shoots himself in the head.

For a movie boasting of an all-female cast, the movie is an astonishingly anti-feminist film. Starting with the fact that all 8 female characters are built around a man, Marcel. Throughout the film, we are given the impression that one of them killed Marcel, only later to discover that he was never dead. All these women are both appealing and appalling, it is clear that they are each willing to do whatever it takes for money, love, revenge, and this is in fact what really kills Marcel. The movie is filled with songs with themes of disappointed love, loneliness, and yearning. To me, these songs seem to be each of the women's victimizing, self-justification for their appalling actions. What I find most concerning is Mamy's crime (she poisoned and killed her husband) and Suzon's confession (she is pregnant with her 'father's' child). The movie, instead of presenting these very private secrets as serious and appalling claims, turns the death of Marcel into a joke. The whole movie, to me, seems as though it is a criticization of females and their relationships with males, and yet somehow, it seems absurd for me to criticize it for this appalling view as it is supposed to be a satirical comedy.

While I do appreciate this very obvious comedy, I cannot help but find that the movie happened to be a humorous crossover between sexual decadence and violence. Though this film is veiled within the guise of being feminist, it somehow manages to completely demonize each of the female characters. What stands out to me the most is the way in which each female character is so under-represented and villainized. Don't get me wrong though, this movie is worth a watch, the depth of the dialogues, the vibrancy of the characters, the songs, all come together to paint a wonderful yet slightly peculiar picture of French culture.

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating
Facebook Comments