10 Southern Stereotypes That Are 100% True

10 Southern Stereotypes That Are 100% True

Bless your heart, hun. Now go grab me a sweet tea, ma'am.
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Being from a tiny town near the Tennessee and Kentucky borders of Virginia, I've always considered myself to be "Southern." However, I didn't realize just what this meant until I came to college and truly discovered the different cultures of the United States. I've learned that in the eyes of most, the South is a lovely place that often has some hilarious stereotypes. While some of them aren't true, a lot of them are.

1. "Y'all"

This one is fairly obvious, but just for clarity, yes. We do say "y'all." All the time.

2. Calling people from the North "Yankees"

Anyone who isn't Southern is a Yankee. If you make us mad or act like a stereotypical New Yorker, you're a d*mn Yankee. *Note, this is the only time it is acceptable to cuss (yes, "cuss," not "curse")*

3. College football is a religion

I promise you that we really do show up to football games as "guys in ties and girls in pearls" for 98% of football games. That's just how it is. You've never been to a tailgate until you've been to a tailgate with SEC fans.

4. The Bible Belt

There's a church on every street and nearly everyone you'll meet has one that they attend at least semi-regularly.

5. "Bless your heart"

Perhaps the most Southern of Southern stereotypes, the "bless your heart" is almost always an insult. It's also pretty fun to substitute it with "I love *person* to death, but..."

6. Monograms

While I'm not as into the monograms as some, they're definitely a huge thing.

7. "Yes/no, ma'am/sir"

No one really knows why, but you just say it.

8. Sunday best/really nice church clothes

You'd better look as nice as you ever have when you go to church. Picking out an Easter dress is a massive ordeal that usually begins a month in advance at the very latest. Seersucker and pearls are a staple for any girl trying to pull this off. Essentially, anything that you'd picture being on a postcard for Southerners going to church is completely accurate.

9. Families are super important

Friends are great, but your family goes before everything except Jesus. Got a boy/girlfriend that your family doesn't like? Dump them. Family gatherings happen really often - like once a week often.

10. Sweet tea

You will be judged if you call it "iced tea." You will be judged if you don't like drinking it. You will be judged if you think hot tea is better. You will be judged if you think that unsweet tea (*shudders*) is better. There is one kind of tea. Lemon, peach, strawberry, blackberry, or raspberry flavoring optional. And yes, we really do drink it out of Mason jars half the time.

Cover Image Credit: pxhere.com

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I Am A Female And I Am So Over Feminists

I believe that I am a strong woman, but I also believe in a strong man.
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Beliefs are beliefs, and everyone is entitled to their opinion. I'm all about girl power, but in today's world, it's getting shoved down our throats. Relax feminists, we're OK.

My inspiration actually came from a man (God forbid, a man has ideas these days). One afternoon my boyfriend was telling me about a discussion his class had regarding female sports and how TV stations air fewer female competitions than that of males. In a room where he and his other male classmate were completely outnumbered, he didn't have much say in the discussion.

Apparently, it was getting pretty heated in the room, and the women in the class were going on and on about how society is unfair to women in this aspect and that respect for the female population is shrinking relative to the male population.

If we're being frank here, it's a load of bull.

SEE ALSO: To The Women Who Hate Feminism

First of all, this is the 21st century. Women have never been more respected. Women have more rights in the United States than ever before. As far as sports go, TV stations are going to air the sports that get the most ratings. On a realistic level, how many women are turning on Sports Center in the middle of the day? Not enough for TV stations to make money. It's a business, not a boycott against female athletics.

Whatever happened to chivalry? Why is it so “old fashioned" to allow a man to do the dirty work or pay for meals? Feminists claim that this is a sign of disrespect, yet when a man offers to pick up the check or help fix a flat tire (aka being a gentleman), they become offended. It seems like a bit of a double standard to me. There is a distinct divide between both the mental and physical makeup of a male and female body. There is a reason for this. We are not equals. The male is made of more muscle mass, and the woman has a more efficient brain (I mean, I think that's pretty freaking awesome).

The male body is meant to endure more physical while the female is more delicate. So, quite frankly, at a certain point in life, there need to be restrictions on integrating the two. For example, during that same class discussion that I mentioned before, one of the young ladies in the room complained about how the NFL doesn't have female athletes. I mean, really? Can you imagine being tackled by a 220-pound linebacker? Of course not. Our bodies are different. It's not “inequality," it's just science.

And while I can understand the concern in regard to money and women making statistically less than men do, let's consider some historical facts. If we think about it, women branching out into the workforce is still relatively new in terms of history. Up until about the '80s or so, many women didn't work as much as they do now (no disrespect to the women that did work to provide for themselves and their families — you go ladies!). We are still climbing the charts in 2016.

Though there is still considered to be a glass ceiling for the working female, it's being shattered by the perseverance and strong mentality of women everywhere. So, let's stop blaming men and society for how we continue to “struggle" and praise the female gender for working hard to make a mark in today's workforce. We're doing a kick-ass job, let's stop the complaining.

I consider myself to be a very strong and independent female. But that doesn't mean that I feel the need to put down the opposite gender for every problem I endure. Not everything is a man's fault. Let's be realistic ladies, just as much as they are boneheads from time to time, we have the tendency to be a real pain in the tush.

It's a lot of give and take. We don't have to pretend we don't need our men every once in a while. It's OK to be vulnerable. Men and women are meant to complement one another—not to be equal or to over-power. The genders are meant to balance each other out. There's nothing wrong with it.

I am all for being a proud woman and having confidence in what I say and do. I believe in myself as a powerful female and human being. However, I don't believe that being a female entitles me to put down men and claim to be the “dominant" gender. There is no “dominant" gender. There's just men and women. Women and men. We coincide with each other, that's that. Time to embrace it.

Cover Image Credit: chrisjohnbeckett / Flickr

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Yes, I Am A Female College Student, And Yes, I Am Pro-Life

You CAN be both.

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As a twenty-something year old woman at a liberal arts college, I often find myself on the not-so-popular end of pro-choice or pro-life debates. And, if I'm being completely honest, I generally try to avoid those debates altogether. But this past weekend, some of my fellow students, three buses of students from my old high school (including my little sister), and millions of people from across the country marched in Washington D.C. and all over the country in support of the Pro-Life movement.

While I went twice in high school and found it to be one of the most formative experiences of my life (it definitely made the way into a few of my college admittance essays), I wasn't able to attend the march this year. But in solidarity with my friends and family, I want them to know - and the whole world to know - that they are not alone in their fight for life.

Growing up in 13 years of Catholic schooling, I never got to hear the opposing side of the Pro-Life debate. Sure, I knew what Pro-Choice was, but in all honesty, it was a kind of vague, somewhat demonized stance that I didn't understand. Major talk in devils-advocate scenarios were always the extreme cases that people make for abortion like incest or rape, not real-life (common) critiques that would be valuable to learn to talk about.

Coming to college - and a liberal arts, non-religiously affiliated one at that - definitely made me grow up pretty quick and realize that, at least it would seem like I was the minority opinion, not the majority. And as anyone who has led a sheltered life to be confronted with the world can attest: it was not a comfortable eureka moment. In my first year of college, I was faced with a decision: I, after 13 years of school and 4 years in a pro-life club, could slowly remove myself from the debate and remain quietly pro-life or I could change my opinion to be popular with my peers. While I am proud to say that I didn't conform to the latter, I'm not necessarily proud to say that I did the former either.

During my freshman year, I joined Butler's pro-life club, Bulldogs for Life. (Yes, when I say the name to people out of context, they tell me it's nice that I care about dogs, and are then generally turned off when I explain that it's pro-life.) It was a small club, with inconsistent meeting times, and only about 10 members at each meeting. I, reluctantly, admit that in that year I probably only went to about 5 meetings and didn't go to almost any of the "engagement" activities. I was scared. There was such a stigma about being pro-life that I didn't even know existed. It went from quickly from an argument and stance that I made primarily through religion, to almost not being able to utilize these lines of argument because the people I was dialoguing with didn't even adhere to the same religion as me. It wasn't until my junior year that I felt really comfortable talking to my peers about my beliefs.

While I've always been taught and raised to believe that I could do and be anything I wanted to be - regardless of my gender - I was confronted with the idea that because I didn't believe in a woman's right to choose to murder her own child before it was born, I was against ALL women's rights. People where implicitly arguing that I didn't believe that women had the right to control their own lives. I believe that a woman doesn't have the right to choose whether a child lives or dies. We would be horrified if a woman killed her infant baby a few months after birth, but people go on Women's Marches lobbying for the right to do the same a few months before the birth.

Moving from a part of the body to the outside world doesn't make someone human, and that's basically, in a crude nutshell, what the difference is between a baby being in the womb and not. I know that there are plenty of lines of debate about what actually makes someone human. That is not possibly a debate that I could write in an Odyssey article to satisfy anyone. What I can do is say I FIRMLY believe that a child is a child from the moment it is conceived by its parents, and that baby should have the right to live the same to any other human being like you and me right now.

I don't expect to change the world with this article. I don't even expect that many people to agree with me. But please know, all of you high school students who went on the March for Life: it WILL get harder. When you graduate and move on to college, you will be faced with a choice to stand up and stick to what you believe or to quietly wait on the sidelines. You may feel pressured to not voice or even change your opinion. I hope that all of you know - and all the college students too - that there are people out there that believe that women can have it all, and ALL their children can, too.

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