Rubberneck Now Open On Chicago Ave

Rubberneck Now Open On Chicago Ave

Get to know the new gallery on the block.
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Founded in May of 2017 by Charlie and John Cibula, Rubberneck serves as a studio, gallery, and residence on the near west side of Chicago (@ 2058 W. Chicago Ave.) Adding to the growing art hub of West Town Chicago, Putt-Putt in the City is the inaugural opening of the gallery.

The exhibition space is a commercial gallery that specializes in contemporary art; painting, photography, and fiber-based artworks. The newcomer gallery will promote the work of emerging local and underrepresented artists and seeks to strengthen local and global networks, adding to a tradition of growing independent, cooperative and artist-run spaces in Chicago.

Putt Putt in the City features the works of multidisciplinary contemporary artists Faith Wittrock and John Cibula curated by Lauren Iacoponi and Cassidy Kean.

The inaugural opening took place on Saturday, September 30th and was a huge success, with 12 out of 25 pieces sold on the opening night. Guests enjoyed food catered by El Metro Mexican Cantina and drinks provided by the gallery. Attendance reached well-over one-hundred guests, including fellow artists, collectors and well-wishers from the neighboring community.

Putt-Putt in the City

Negotiated Narratives | 2017

Each individual is responsible for constructing their own reality--bridging the gaps between new, unfamiliar information acquired daily, and their existing perception.

This exhibition addresses these psychological operations. Through specialized modes of rendering varied figures and incorporating drawing within paintings, these works examine the dual processes of reshaping observations to fit perception, and conversely, reshaping perception to accommodate new, challenging observations. Upon introduction to specific figurative scenes, paired with diagrammatic representations of psychological structures, viewers are invited to entertain the emotional ramifications accompanying a reformation of perception.

Diagrams charting separate phases of cognitive functions, or visualized structures of a dynamic psyche, directly discuss mechanisms involved in the incorporation of information gleaned from any worldly interaction into an individual’s understanding. Heavily altered sketchbook inclusions offer an example of a homogenized reality, blending perforated edges and disparate subjects--with systematic outlining and compression of space with a standardized latex paint--into a single string of consciousness.

Figure paintings exhibiting specific “scenes” prompt the viewers to assume the role of observer and participant in each piece. Whether or not concrete meaning can be gleaned from context information, these paintings simulate the experience of overcoming a dissociated view of an occurrence and conducting a narrative of relevance.

If willing, viewers may become participants of painted scenes, and attempt to negotiate the disconnect between empathized desires for intimacy, and their own objective observations. With this stage of engagement, Wittrock and Cibula aim to question relationships between actual life occurrences and the potential of perception.

The negotiation and reformation of individuals’ developing realities is a common thread within Wittrock and Cibula's work, driving them to further explore the continual affectation of past and current understandings and the in the way in which we weave personal truths.

-Press Release by Faith Wittrock (edited by Lauren Ike)




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Cover Image Credit: © Rubberneck Gallery

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The End Of The Semester As Told By Todd Chrisley

Because we're all a little dramatic like Todd sometimes.
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The last 3-4 weeks of every college student’s semester are always crazy hectic. We have last minute assignments, group projects, and exams all squeezed into the last few weeks before break.

Sometimes we all need a little humor, and sometimes we are all a little dramatic, so why not experience the last few weeks of the semester as told by the king of drama himself, Todd Chrisley of Chrisley Knows Best.

1. Sitting in class listening to your professor explain upcoming assignments/exams.

2. When your group project members refuse to do anything until the night before it's due or just show up the day of to present.


3. When you and your roommate try to cook with whatever few ingredients you have left in stock.

Because we definitely want to avoid going to the grocery store at the end of the semester if we can.

4. When your parents get tired of you calling them about every little inconvenience in your life.

5. Sitting down to work on assignments.


6. Your thoughts when the professor is telling you what they want from you out of an assignment.


7. When you've had about 30 mental breakdowns in 2 days.

8. Trying to search out the class for the right group members.

9. The last few days of classes where everyone and everything is getting on your nerves.

10. When your friend suggests going out but you're just done with the world.

11. This. On the daily.

12. When all you want to do is snuggle up and watch Christmas movies.


13. Studying and realizing you know nothing.


14. When your finals are over and it's finally time to go home for break.


You're finally back to your old self.

Cover Image Credit: Instagram

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12 Classics That All College Students Should Read

Reading is important — yet many people forget about books.

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These are the classics that I think all college students should read.

1. "Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger

This classic by J.D. Salinger is a staple for many high school kids. Yet, I believe college students should revisit this novel, as it's a great portrayal of adolescence.

2. "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald 

Love him or hate him, Jay Gatsby is one of literature's most recognizable characters. "The Great Gatsby" is a tragic story of a man stuck in the past, and a grim warning of the empty happiness money buys.

3. "The Time Machine" by H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells was far beyond his time. His novel, "The Time Machine," explores what would happen if time-travelling could happen. It's both an evocative and frightening tale, full of important philosophical questions.

4. "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde 

This novel is about the degradation of Dorian Gray, and his descent into depravity. It showcases one of the greatest character declines in literature. By the end, Dorian Gray finds his life to be empty, his hedonistic lifestyle pointless.

5. "Norwegian Wood" by Haruki Murakami 

Haruki Murakami is famous for his surreal novels. "Norwegian Wood" follows a college student in Japan, as he navigates life after a tragedy. It's both beautiful yet melancholy. If nothing else, it'll get you listening to the Beatles' Norwegian Wood.

6. "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte 

I consider "Jane Eyre" to be one of the first feminist novels. It's a fantastic Gothic novel about an independent and strong woman — Jane Eyre — who meets the mysterious Mr. Rochester. It's more than a romance — it's a commentary on Victorian societal expectations of women, with Jane representing objection to it.

7. "The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak

This novel is a beautiful story about a girl in Nazi Germany. Liesel Meminger knows the importance of books, and uses her knowledge and kindness to save a Jewish refugee. It's a poignant novel that expresses the importance of literature and books.

8. Any Sherlock Holmes mystery by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

If you've watched the Sherlock series with Benedict Cumberbatch, then you should definitely give the novels a go. The mysteries are exciting and intriguing, despite their old age.

9. "Great Expectations" by Charles Dickens

This is one of my absolute favorites novels. It follows a young boy named Pip, who befriends a beggar, meets the depraved Miss Havisham, and falls in love with unattainable Estella. This novel is at once a bildungsroman and a tragedy.

10.  "Lolita" by Vladimir Nabokov 

This controversial novel by Vladimir Nobokov follows the perspective of Humbert Humbert, a depraved man who falls in love with 12-year-old Lolita. Nobokov showcases his mastery of the English language, while writing a depraved and tragic story following two terrible people.

11.  "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen

Perhaps one of the most famous novels of all time, "Pride and Prejudice" stands the test of time by showing how two outwardly opposite and contrary people can come together and form an amazing love. It's about accepting one's flaws and getting to know people beyond surface level.

12.  "All Quiet on the Western Front" by Erich Maria Remarque

This is a fantastic novel that depicts the absolute horrors of war, particularly World War I. If this doesn't enlighten you about the realities and horrors of war, then no book will.

Reading is important as it broadens one's horizon. Literature is one of the greatest inventions of mankind.

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