How We Can Help Millennials With Mental Illnesses

How We Can Help Millennials With Mental Illnesses

Make Mental Health Less Taboo.
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Over the course of my childhood, there have been people here and there who, including myself, have suffered from various mental illnesses. But recently, as I began college, I noticed more and more people having to deal with severe mental issues. Why is this happening? Were they always there and I just noticed? Or are we at that age where our brains are put under so much pressure that they cannot handle it without some type of medication?

This is a subject that has bothered me for a while. In high school, I had to tip-toe around others to hide that I'm dealing with things like anxiety and depression. But in college, as you are scrolling through your social media accounts, there are many jokes that normalize these mental illnesses. They become those "relatable" memes that everyone "likes." These memes include "funny" captions like "Netflix and Avoid People"

or "Me to me," with Kermit the frog talking to himself about self-destructive behaviors.

Not that comic relief isn't a good thing, but that makes it so normal that people don't understand the actual amount of suffering that happens while you are experiencing mental illnesses. There are "funny" memes where there are fake text messages saying phrases such as "I'm in the middle of a mental breakdown, you? / Just got through a mental breakdown."

While this is light, the main issue isn't addressed. Why are millennials (people approximately 18-early 30s) suffering from these mental illnesses?

My theory is that as we develop into adults, much like a sorting hat, it seems we are each assigned a battle to fight as we develop into who we are supposed to be. Maybe we are healthy children, but the habits we develop as adults cause some type of mental or physical illness.

According to an article for the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI):

"Millennials are often referred to as the 'anxious generation.' They were the first to grow up with the constant overflow of the Internet and social media. The Internet can make life better, but it can also make life complicated, as Millennials often compare their personal and professional achievements to everyone else’s. This can result in low self-esteem and insecurity."

The article is right about social media causing low self esteem. I know when I was growing from a teen into an adult, I started to want to be friends with certain people because they looked "cool" on Facebook and Instagram. I diminished my achievements because it didn't seem "good enough" to match everyone else's. I'm not saying social media causes that actual chemical imbalance that is a mental illness, but it certainly doesn't help it.

Also, as I said before, maybe it's the fact that we are given more pressure somewhere, starting from the most important year in high school- junior year -and all throughout college when we are trying to figure out our career paths. We have deadlines, are expected to manage our time between rest, work, school, maintaining appearance and a social life. I know for a FACT if you have no social life, and I've had that, it can lead to depression; a socal life is just as important as the other parts of life.

I like to reference the mental and emotional health pyramid, also known as Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs:

The pyramid is not properly taught growing up and should be included in the school health curriculum. Now I'm not saying that knowing all these things will actually deter the medical problem that is mental illness, but it will give you at least an idea of what important factors to focus on in your life. Also, therapy is still a taboo subject. Therapy is not just for people with mental illnesses; it is like having a life coach. And it is all about you. THAT is what needs to be normalized. WHY so many people experience health problems at this age; I'm not a doctor so I don't know, but we can help each other by opening a discussion about it.

Cover Image Credit: geralt / Pixabay

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These Are 4 Proven Ways That Vaccines Cause Autism

Stock up on those essential oils.

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Let's just start with the first (and main) point.

1. They don't.

Susan in your anti-vax group is not a scholarly source (despite her hours and hours of Google research).

2. But in case you still believe Susan...

Maybe you'll believe Autism Speaks who says, "Scientists have conducted extensive research over the last two decades to determine whether there is any link between childhood vaccinations and autism. The results of this research is clear: Vaccines do not cause autism."

3. And if Autism Speaks still didn't convince you...

Feel free to take a look at this comprehensive list of studies that all say that there is no relationship between vaccines such as the MMR vaccination and the development of autism.

4. But here's what you should know...

There have been a few studies lately that have shown that autism develops in utero aka before a baby is even born AND before a baby can even receive vaccinations.

Vaccinations have prevented COUNTLESS deaths and illnesses. Vaccination rates are continuing to fall and do you know what that means? Measles will make its way back. Whooping cough will come back. Rubella, mumps, and polio will come back and there will be no way to stop it.

So, now that you know that vaccines do not cause autism, you're welcome to go tell Susan from your anti-vax group that as well as tell her that the Earth isn't flat. But, don't forget to mention it to her that her essential oils and organic foods are not keeping her children safe from the measles or tuberculosis.

Vaccinate your children. And, besides, even IF vaccinations caused autism, wouldn't you rather have a child with a developmental disorder rather than a child who died from the measles?

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I Lost Two Babies Before Age 20, And I’m Proud Of Alabama For Banning Abortion

Life begins at conception.

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Gov. Kay Ivey signed the Alabama Human Life Protection Act into law on May 15 after it passed with flying colors in both branches of Alabama legislature.

The Alabama Human Life Protection Act will criminalize abortions in Alabama, with a "successful abortion" being a Class A felony (punishable by up to 99 years in prison), and an "attempted abortion" being a Class C penalty.

Before moving on, I feel as though I need to point out that these felony charges are NOT for the woman, but for the doctor/professional who performs the abortion.

Much of the opposition comes from the lack of exceptions for cases of rape and incest. However, there is an exception in cases where the mother's life is at extreme risk.

SEE ALSO: Alabama's Abortion Ban, Passed Into Law By 25 Men, Is Not Pro-Life — It's Anti-Woman

I've seen A LOT of posts lately from the liberal/pro-choice side of the issue, with little public representation (outside of personal social media outlets) from the pro-life side. So, here is my take on the matter.

I've always been a very open person and someone who can at least listen to (and respect) the opinions of others, even when they don't match my own beliefs. But the topic of abortion is my only exception.

I will NEVER be able to fathom how anyone in their right minds can support abortion. To me, it isn't an issue of pure opinion. It's about morals. Either you're okay with the murdering of unborn children or you're not. And unless you are in the latter group, your morals should be in question.

My opinions and beliefs on abortion are not based on culture or religion. When I was young, it could be argued that my raising or my Christian beliefs could be "to blame" for my pro-life stance. However, that is no longer the case. While I do still live in the same culture and still believe in the same religion, my stance is all my own, based on my own life experiences.

I became pregnant at 17 and was certainly scared out of my mind, but I made my choices and my own careless actions resulted in the conception of that beautiful, unmistakable life that grew inside of me.

But I lost that little life due to circumstances that I could not control.

At 19, I became pregnant again, for an even shorter period of time. Honestly, even in such early stages of pregnancy, there is still proof of that life inside of you. Little things that sometimes are hard to notice and sometimes are hard to ignore. I knew I was pregnant very early on both times, but I can promise you that, while one pregnancy was planned and one was not, that little life inside of me was ALWAYS a life.

From the moment I conceived, there was a life separate from my own.

As a woman who has lost pregnancies and worries about her future fertility, it angers me to even begin to think about a careless woman taking the life of her child due to her own selfish agenda.

Some argue that while our adoption and foster system are overrun, abortions should continue (and are considered to be the most viable option). Honestly, though, our world is crowded, over-populated, and dying, but you don't see liberals promoting mass genocide and murder just to protect and/or save the other half of the population.

SEE ALSO: I'm A Small Town Christian From Alabama, But As A Woman, I Cannot Support Banning Abortion

No one is standing up and saying, "But wouldn't it be better for everyone just to kill off half of us? Those who die will not have to suffer and those who live will prosper." Isn't that sort of what abortion is? Murdering a select group of life, just to save them from suffering and to protect those still here?

While I understand the utter travesty and pain of those impregnated due to rape, who are we to decide that the life of a baby conceived in such ways is any less important than another? I get that the lack of exceptions is infuriating to those who already believe abortion to be justified.

But honestly, a life is a life is a life.

One life is no more or less worthy of protection than another.

The state of Alabama and its elected officials have shown bravery and efficiency these past couple weeks. Their hard work and dedication have brought this state honor and pride.

Rep. Terri Collins, the bill's sponsor, is courageous and strong. Even though the risks and backlash were known, Collins pushed this bill anyway and saw to it that the state of Alabama would no longer sit by the wayside and be a part of the murdering of innocent, unborn children.

I'm so glad that my home state now has the most strict laws on abortion in the United States since Roe v. Wade.

I firmly believe in The Alabama Human Life Protection Act.

I proudly stand with Alabama and its elected officials because life begins at conception.

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