It's Time We Face The Truth: Women's Clothing Sizes Are BS

It's Time We Face The Truth: Women's Clothing Sizes Are BS

Why am I a small in one store and a large in another? Can we please have a system that actually makes sense.

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With summer just around the corner, I recently went shopping and looked for new shorts and jeans. I had a hard time finding shorts that fit me and my size changed depending on the store and brand, it was beyond frustrating.

This is a problem that a lot of girls have had with clothes over the years. I even found old shorts that were from the same store, same brand and had the same appearance, but were three different sizes from three different years. How is a size 5, 3, and 1 all the same in everything but in how it's labeled?

I learned a few years ago that guys pants come in two sizes based on their waist and inseam measurements and they can pick up a pair that is that exact size and check out. They don't even really need to try them on. Why do guys get exact clothing sizes? Why do these sizes not change? Why are girls pants and shorts different sizes from store to store and on top of that, why don't stores accommodate all sizes? Why are shirt sizes so drastically different? Why are bras the only easy garment to buy, but even that is an entire process?

I was curious and googled women's clothing size history and ended up at this chart and this article.

Women's clothing sizes are up to designers and aren't regulated by any standards. A size eight could fit anyone from a 26 size waist to a 31 size waist. That's a five-inch difference for pants that should theoretically be the same size. So you could be a size eight at one store and a size 12 in another.

Not only does it make it harder and more time consuming for women to shop, but it also is detrimental to our mental health, plus online shopping is always a gamble. When you can't find pants that fit or change drastically in size, you can start to feel crappy and have negative body images, which you shouldn't feel bad about your size and it should NEVER be hard for you to find clothing.

It's so frustrating. I wish that there could be some kind of standard for women's clothing and more variety because everyone should be able to go to a store and find pants and a shirt that fit without having to go through an entire process every time. It's really not that much to ask for, is it?

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PSA: Keep Your Body-Negative Opinions Away From Little Girls This Summer

But our own baggage shouldn't be shoved on to those we surround ourselves with.

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It's officially swimsuit season, y'all.

The temperature is rising, the sun is bright and shining, and a trip to the beach couldn't look more appealing than it does right now. This is the time of year that many of us have been rather impatiently waiting for. It's also the time of year that a lot of us feel our most self-conscious.

I could take the time to remind you that every body is a bikini body. I could type out how everyone is stunning in their own unique way and that no one should feel the need to conform to a certain standard of beauty to feel beautiful, male or female. I could sit here and tell you that the measurement of your waistline is not a reflection of your worth. I completely believe every single one of these things.

Hell, I've shared these exact thoughts more times than I can count. This time around, however, I'm not going to say all these things. Instead, I'm begging you to push your insecurities to the side and fake some confidence in yourself when you're in front of others.

Why?

Because our negative self-image is toxic and contagious and we're spreading this negative thinking on to others.

We're all guilty of this, we're with family or a friend and we make a nasty comment about some aspect of our appearance, not even giving a single thought to the impact our words have on the person with us. You might think that it shouldn't bother them- after all, we're not saying anything bad about them! We're just expressing our feelings about something we dislike about ourselves. While I agree that having conversations about our insecurities and feelings are important for our mental and emotional health, there is a proper and improper way of doing it. An open conversation can leave room for growth, acceptance, understanding, and healing. Making a rude or disheartening remark about yourself is destructive not only to yourself, but it will make the person you are saying these things around question their own self worth or body image by comparing themselves to you.

My little sister thinks she's "fat." She doesn't like how she looks. To use her own words, she thinks she's "too chubby" and that she "looks bad in everything."

She's 12 years old.

Do you want to know why she has this mindset? As her older sister, I failed in leading her by example. There were plenty of times when I was slightly younger, less sure of myself, and far more self-conscious than I am now, that I would look in the mirror and say that I looked too chubby, that my body didn't look good enough, that I wished I could change the size of my legs or stomach.

My little sister had to see the older sibling she looks up to, the big sis she thinks always looks beautiful, say awful and untrue things about herself because her own sense of body image was warped by media, puberty, and comparing herself to others.

My negativity rubbed off onto her and shaped how she looks at herself. I can just imagine her watching me fret over how I look thinking, "If she thinks she's too big, what does that make me?"

It makes me feel sick.

All of us are dealing with our own insecurities. It takes some of us longer than others to view ourselves in a positive, loving light. We're all working on ourselves every day, whether it be mentally, physically, or emotionally. But our own baggage shouldn't be shoved on to those we surround ourselves with, our struggles and insecurities should not form into their own burdens.

Work on yourself in private. Speak kindly of yourself in front of others. Let your positivity, real or not, spread to others instead of the bad feelings we have a bad habit of letting loose.

The little girls of the world don't need your or my negative self-image this summer. Another kid doesn't need to feel worthless because we couldn't be a little more loving to ourselves and a lot more conscious of what we say out loud.

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Gucci’s Commodification Of Cultural Clothing Is A Problem The Fashion Industry Needs To Address

Brands like Gucci and Zara are only commodifying the culture of others rather than making any attempt to celebrate and respect them.

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Recently, Gucci faced backlash for selling Sikh turbans as hats for $790. The brand had already come under fire when the turbans were featured in Gucci's Fall 2018 show, especially due to Gucci's use of white models to wear the turbans on the runway. It seems that the previous backlash has not discouraged Gucci from continuing on to sell the turbans for a high price.

Members of the Sikh community were quick to express outrage at the monetization of the turbans, pointing out the religious significance of the Sikh turban. The reduction of the turban to a mere accessory for fashion is offensive enough on its own, but selling them at such a high price only further commodifies an item that is considered sacred to many and would normally not cost nearly as much in the Sikh community.

This incident with Gucci, however, is far from being the only instance where a cultural item has been monetized in the fashion industry. Many have also questioned Zara's new sandals, which bear a close resemblance to waraji, woven straw sandals that were once popular among common people in Japan. The main source of confusion among members of the Japanese community was the price of the sandals, which are being sold at 7,990 yen ($72) while waraji are usually only 200-300 yen (about $2-$3).

Waraji do not appear to have the same spiritual significance as the Sikh turban, but both Gucci's and Zara's attempts to sell these items for much higher prices are all-too-common examples of cultural appropriation. Even if the item does not have sacred or religious value, it is still something that belongs to another culture and should not be monetized in such a manner. Drawing inspiration from other cultures is not harmful on its own if done respectfully, but simply borrowing cultural items and selling them as luxury items at a higher price range is far from being respectful. In these instances, these items are passed off "better" than the original by a brand that does not come from the culture it is borrowing from. Zara should not be given more credit than the people of Japan who used to wear waraji. In the case of Gucci, the turban should not have been touched at all.

The monetization of other cultures is, unfortunately, far too common, especially in the fashion industry. Brands like Gucci and Zara are only commodifying the culture of others rather than making any attempt to celebrate and respect them. Hiking up the prices of items belonging to another culture is a glaringly obvious act of cultural appropriation and a trend that needs to stop.

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