Everyone Has a Disability

Everyone Has a Disability

Disability has a negative connotation, but should it?

Disability- Anything that disables or puts one at a disadvantage. (Dictionary.com)
Think of the word disability, what is the first thing that comes to mind. Is it the kid in the wheelchair, a handicap parking place. Most people when they hear the word disability, they do not think of themselves. When the truth is, most people have a disability of some sort.

As you go about your day, notice the people who wear glasses. Bad vision is a disability. Notice people who are short. They are put at a disadvantage when playing basketball, so that is a disability.



So I ask you as you read my perspective of my disability; not to feel sorry for me, but to try and understand. I want you to understand that while a disability may seem small, it also can be quite frustrating.

Imagine what it would be like to be unable to button a shirt, sign your name, or carry a cup of coffee without spilling it. Imagine having days when it is so difficult to eat your lunch that you finally give up. Where counting out change is so terrifying a task that you do not go shopping without your little sister there to count your change.

What I have is an essential tremor. It is a neurological disorder which causes you to shake uncontrollably. It is made worse by stress, anxiety, caffeine, hunger, and many other things. It is a common disorder; an estimated 10 million Americans have it. Although it is more common in older people, children and teens are able to develop it.

This causes quite a bit of frustration in my life.

People tell me to stop. My mom yelled at me, she told me I needed to stop, when I spilled a cup of coffee on the floor of the church. This causes frustration because I really cannot stop, however, people seem to think I should be able to.

Today for lunch I was trying to eat crackers. Sounds simple, right? Well, not always! I would pick up the cracker and my hand would start shaking, so I would end up dropping the cracker. This would just make me frustrated. This causes the tremor to get worse, which can turn into a vicious cycle.

Sometimes I will be signing my name, and I realize that I will have this condition for the rest of my life. This is extremely frustrating. I tend to think, why me? Why now? I am not old, I thought only old people had this problem?

Well, although some people wouldn’t consider this a disability. I would argue that this is as much a disability as anything else. The definition of disability, as stated above is, “Anything that disables or puts one at a disadvantage.” I would have to say this does put me at a disadvantage to others. It makes writing difficult, especially under stress. As well as, keep me from doing many simple things like buttoning a shirt.

I do not want you to pity me, or to pity anyone else with a disability. Rather, I would like you to try to understand. Stand in our shoes for a day before you make fun of someone because their hands shake, or call someone who wears glasses, a four-eyed monster. Thank You.















Cover Image Credit: Insurance Age

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Family And Friends Of Chronic Illness Need Support Too

Before you get upset about a family member or friend misunderstanding the effect of your condition, think of how it affects THEM.

At first I was upset that I poured my heart out in an eczema support group and received no response whatsoever. A lady in this group had a son experience such bad eczema that she turned to the group as a last resort for support. Dozens of comments said "I'm sorry" and offered their medicines, creams, diets and holistic methods, but I was the only one to comment on the most important factor in healing myself: long-term emotional and spiritual support of the person in pain. I was wondering why someone would ask for help and then give no feedback that they accepted or denied the comments. I felt like my response, which mattered so much to me, was shunned, because it wasn't good enough.

I was wrong in asking myself why she didn't respond. How dare I ask such a question without considering what she's going through? How must she be feeling getting all these responses that her son may or may not have already tried? What is she going through being a mother with a child in pain? She posted about her son, which caused me to respond, but that doesn't mean I should have expected anything in return.

In the heat of the moment, I could have written an article called, "I Wrote This Long Emotionally Invested Comment About Chronic Pain That Was Ignored," but that would have accomplished nothing. Instead, I'm writing an article celebrating the strong voices in a community of struggles. You are amazing for reaching out with your concerns and using your voice to share awareness.

I want people outside of these support groups to know that we're not against each other. We should celebrate our accomplishments together, and offer any assistance possible when others need it. So response or no response, if you feel affected by my comment in anyway, that's all that matters to me.

On January 11, 2018, Kaehla Maurer wrote:

I hope you find something helpful in these comments. Although I'm not giving a cure, as someone who has battled extreme eczema and anxiety my whole life I know this is just as important. When his skin is good continue to practice preventative measures, such herbal remedies, diet, keep him active, UV, salt rooms, allergy testing, etc even when you think things are no longer necessary. Keep your house clean and organized, especially the air. Learn to live a healthy lifestyle so he can learn too. I've found living healthy makes it much more manageable.

I hope you find something helpful in these comments. Although I'm not giving a cure, as someone who has battled extreme eczema and anxiety my whole life I know this is just as important. When his skin is good continue to practice preventative measures, such herbal remedies, diet, keep him active, UV, salt rooms, allergy testing, etc even when you think things are no longer necessary. Keep your house clean and organized, especially the air. Learn to live a healthy lifestyle so he can learn too. I've found living healthy makes it much more manageable.

But especially when it's bad, continue to give him absolute love and support to make it as easy to cope with as possible. Even if you're frustrated that he can't help but scratch and have flare ups, don't yell or show disgust. That will eventually break him.

Reassure him that the pain is only temporary (since it comes and goes) and have him focus on the things that relieve his stress and work his mind and body in a healthy way (for me that is performing arts and traveling). Really listen to him and hone in on his passions and strong suits even as early on as being a baby. Learn his triggers as early as possible to reverse the symptoms faster. What's going on around him that might cause him discomfort, and how can he turn them into something positive? Help him to be stronger in aspects of his life that will overshadow his condition.

I would also try different kinds of health professionals, whether doctor or allied health professional. There are thousands of accredited people out there but you have to find one that you TRUST and one who LISTENS. Derm problems are way more than skin deep and even if your dermatologist may be fantastic there is only so much they can do.

I'm may not give advice for immediate relief but this will definitely pay off when he's growing up. I'm just speaking from experience.

Growing up with chronic pain will never be easy, but it will make anyone a stronger person.


Definitely start with allergy testing. I've grown up in the swamps of Florida and only in college did I figure out I'm allergic to mold. Now I'm able to prepare when the count is higher in the air and if a building does not tend to moisture problems or clean their ventilation I know to leave because I start sneezing and flaring immediately.














The bottom line is this: Growing up with chronic illness makes the person AND their family and friends stronger. Keep finding those strengths to thrive.

Cover Image Credit: Jenn Evelyn-Ann

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Why Should I Love My Body?

Don't you love your body?

Everyone has different bodies. Some of us are tall and skinny; while some of us are short with some extra pudge. We all come in different shapes and sizes. No one should ever hate their bodies because they do not look like someone else.

Why love your body?

1. God gave it to you; so be grateful.

When I say this; I look at it as I have friends and family that I have outlived even though I am only 39 years old. I would take my body over being 6 feet under at my age.

2. Even if your body is different; it's not going to change anything about your life.

You can be 500 pounds and become and super model, but nothing about your life will change except you just became a healthier person. You will still be in the same job and financial situations.

3. Food is amazing; we should be eating it.

There are so many different kinds are foods. How can you not love to eat? If you are worried about keeping your figure this plays a big role. You will be so worried about what goes in your body instead of just enjoying the food in front of you. There are many homeless people that would love that food.

4. Looks don't last.

Let's get real. We all hit a certain age where things are going to start to sag and it will be hard to change that unless plastic surgery is involved.

5. You're beautiful just the way you are.

Simple. Everyone is beautiful in their own way. It doesn't have to be looks it can be so many different things.

My point is no matter what walk like Beyonce.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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