Woolly Worm Festival in Boone, North Carolina

The Woolly Worm Festival The Coolest Festival Around

People from all over North Carolina and the United States come and visit their student or just enjoy Boone in Autumn.

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A huge thing for Boone, North Carolina, is the Woolly Worm Festival. This festival has been held now for 41 years and it celebrates the magnificent creature, the Woolly Worm. The festival was started by Jim Morton when he saw a Woolly worm and was afraid to pick it up for fear it would sting him and so he placed a blade of grass in front of it. He realized that when a worm is in a moving mood, it will crawl up something rather than across something, and thus the festival was born. The race consists of a 3-foot nylon rope that the worm crawls up. When you are racing the worms, you want to make sure that you don't have a large one, for they don't enjoy climbing and you want to make it sure it is in a good mood because they are very moody creatures.

When you are a person who lives in Boone or a farmer who has crops, you may rely on the Woolly Worm to predict the weather that is to come. The Woolly Worm has a reputation of being able to predict the weather that is to come, including rain and snow. The legend of this worm is the wider the rust-colored segments are, the milder the winter will be and the more black shown on the worm represents the more severe a winter will be. So far, I, personally, have seen a lot of completely black Woolly Worms and so did my father when he was in Boone for the severe winter of 1993.

The Woolly Worm festival is a race where the winning worm gets to be used to predict the weather for the High County. The Woolly Worm is to us as the groundhog is to everyone else. This worm has an 80-85% accuracy rating, which is pretty good for a little worm that lives in the mountains. The worm has held this record of accuracy for the last 20 years.

The festival itself includes the worm race, over 160 food vendors and craft stands with handcrafted items, as well as rides for children, musicians and dance teams. The festival is a wonderful time for the whole family and it allows people from the High Country to share their traditions through dancing and music as well as their crafts. This is a space for a nice day out where people can come and enjoy themselves as well as play with and watch Woolly Worms race. Anyone can join the race and when you win, not only does your worm predict the weather, but you also win a prize.

In this event, you get to make a worm house, should you want to keep your worm after it races. This is an event where the traditions and culture of Appalachia and the High County can be shared with those who are surrounded by it every day or those visiting for Parent's Weekend. This event is held the third weekend in October which coincides with the Appalachian State University's Parent's Weekend. People from all over North Carolina and the United States come and visit their student or just enjoy Boone in Autumn. If you can, I would recommend venturing to the festival.

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25 Helpful Tips To Survive Any General Admission Concert

The smaller the show, the better. Trust me.
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Live music is something we should all experience in our lifetimes, however, general admission shows can admittedly be a bit daunting. Whether you're a seasoned concert goer or a first timer, I'm sure some of these tips could help make your experience more enjoyable, or frankly, survivable. Let's face it, it gets a little scary in the pit sometimes....


Before the show (day of):


1. If you plan on being front row for your favorite band at a GA show, show up a few hours early to sit outside the venue.

This tactic is so much easier than having to wiggle your way to the front in a very territorial crowd. If you want front row, you're going to have to earn it, and that means sitting down on a cold patch of concrete for hours at a time. You will even meet some cool fans who are just as dedicated as you, and who knows, you may make a friend or two.


2. Always bring a printed copy of your ticket, just in case.

Most venues will accept electronic tickets from your phone, but some venues do not. It's always good to print out a copy of your ticket or check with the venue beforehand to ensure your e-ticket will suffice. Many venues have Twitter pages and will answer quickly if you wish to ask.


3. Never assume you can buy tickets at the door.

You may be able to get away with last minute ticket shopping for smaller shows, but for the most part, it's best to buy ahead as to minimize your panic on the day of the show.


4. Buy your tickets as far in advance as possible.

Most general admission shows are super cheap if you buy tickets as soon as they are released. However, if you put it off, a $20 show can easily become a $100 show. Keep up with your favorite band's tour dates and set reminders to buy tickets as soon as they go on sale to save some money. Beware of ticket resellers, as they will rip you off with zero shame and mercy.


5. Do not be afraid to attend a show by yourself if you are unable to find someone to come with you.

It's happened to all of us. Our concert buddy has to work on the day of a highly anticipated show and despite asking everyone we know, no one can tag along, so we stay home and drown our sorrows in cookie dough ice cream instead. But that is no longer okay. Attending a show by ourselves may seem daunting, unexciting, and let's face it, we don't want to be dubbed a loser. But I'm here to tell you, none of that will happen. Odds are, you're not going to be the only one riding solo at the show and no one will know if you're alone or with a pack of friends anyway. This may even be an opportunity to make new friends and branch out.


6. Make sure to pack a few water bottles for after the show, and if it's a summer show, bring a cooler.

Trust me, as soon as you leave the show, you're going to be dying for a bottle of ice cold water so make sure you have a bottle or two in the car. It will be your savior.


7. Eat a complete meal before the show.

Shows can be expend a lot of energy, so it's always a good idea to come to a show on a relatively full stomach. The last thing you want to happen is pass out a show because you didn't eat or drink beforehand.


8. Dress comfortably and forget about being cute.

Indoor general admissions shows can get a little sweaty, especially if you find yourself squished between a bunch of people. You're going to regret wearing your heeled booties after two hours of standing (trust me, i've been there, done that). You may leave the house looking cute, but odds are, you're going to look every bit of a sweaty disaster post-show.


9. If you're going to wear make-up, make sure it's waterproof.

During the show, you will have water poured on your face by security guards, you will sweat more than you ever have in your whole life, and there may even be a tear or two. Unless you want to have crazy mascara streaks and eyeliner on your nose, you should probably wear waterproof make-up. Then again, no one is going to judge you for your post-show appearance, because odds are, they're not going to be looking too hot themselves. Embrace your ugly and rock out.


10. Wear your hair up.

During the show your hair will likely be pulled, grabbed, and touched by the people in front of you. It's also super annoying to get a face-full of hair at a show, so to make everyone happy, it's a good idea to throw your hair into a high pony and call it a day.


11. Don't, I repeat, DON'T wear a a hoodie or jacket to a show.

Most venues are poorly air-conditioned, and when you throw a million lights and a room full of people into the mix, shows can get pretty hot. The hoodie may have seemed like a good idea going into the show, but five minutes in, you're going to be resenting that hoodie and every life decision you've ever made up to that point. Some venues will have coat-check, but they can get pretty expensive and why risk precious time checking in your coat when you can be rushing to the stage instead? I always try to dress as cooly as I can, despite the weather outside. You can always bring a flannel or light sweater to wrap around your waist when you get warm.


12. Bring in as little as you can to a show and leave the valuables in the car, if at possible.

If you absolutely need to bring things into the venue (phone, medication, merch/beer money, keys, etc.), it's a good idea to bring a small purse or fanny-pack (which are so in style right now) to the show. Don't haul your entire purse to the show because I guarantee you're going to regret lugging it around real quick. And to minimize lost or damaged items, it's best to keep your most beloved items locked safely in the car. Crowds can get pretty rowdy and it's not uncommon to have something broken.


13. To my fellow glasses-wearers: if at all possible, either ditch the glasses for the night or wear contacts.

It's going to rough, but if you can do it, you will not regret it. As mentioned above, crowds get super rowdy, and when you throw in all the crowd surfers who will inevitably kick you or fall on you, there are plenty of chances for your glasses to fall off or be broken. Trust me, I've had two separate pairs of prescription glasses broken beyond repair at shows, and i've seen it happen plenty of other times as well. One semi-blurry night is far better than having to pay for glasses repairs or replacements in the future. Trust me on this one, guys.


During the show:


14. Stay hydrated. Stay hydrated. Stay hydrated.

This is an important one. Whether it's an outdoor concert in the middle of summer or an indoor general admission show, it's going to get hot, you're going to sweat, and you will become dehydrated pretty quickly if you don't make an effort to stay hydrated. If you're close to the stage/barricade, you may get likely and have guards pouring water into your mouth between songs. If not, you may have to cough up five bucks for a bottle. You don't want to pass out or be the one puking into a bucket by the entrance, so drink plenty of water during any show-- especially if you plan on consuming alcohol.


15. Don't over do it and know your limit.

Being front row for a show is an incredible experience. Not only can you hear the music better, but you'll be able to see every sweat droplet on your favorite band member's forehead. However, it can take a lot out of a person. If you feel like things are getting too out of control and you need out, don't be afraid to retreat to side stage or further back where its safer. Enjoying the show is ultimately far better than being front row in the grand scheme of things.


16. If you enjoy mosh-pits, crowd-surfing and the constant push and pull of the crowd, front center stage is your friend.

This part of the show can be really exciting, but it definitely is not for everyone. Between people charging at you, arms and fists flailing, and crowd surfers slammed onto your head as they make their way to the stage, front center stage can get pretty scary and it isn't recommended for first time concert-goers. Of course, this differs from show-to-show and genre-to-genre, but generally speaking, only stand center stage if you're prepared for mass chaos. Also, the middle of the crowd can be pretty dangerous too, as you will find yourself both pushed forward by the people in front of you, and simultaneously pushed backward by the people in front of you.


17. But if you prefer simply enjoying the show in a calm and peaceful manner, side stage or farther back is for you.

Side stage is always a good bet, since you will still have a pretty good view, will be close to the stage, and will almost certainly avoid the chaos and crowd-surfers.


18. Look out for crowd-surfers and protect your head from stray kicks or drops.

While crowd surfers certainly make things a bit more energetic, they come at a price. Always pay attention to what is going on around you, or simply look at the guard's reactions to avoid a kick to the head or neck. Pass along the surfer when you can, or if it's too late, protect your head by ducking and covering it. Concussions are common at music festivals and general admission shows so try to prevent one at all costs. Again, majority of your crowd-surfer interactions will be center stage, so if the prospect of holding up a sweaty human does not sound very appealing to you, side stage is for you. Side note: if you're wearing heeled shows, please do your fellow concert-goers a favor and don't crowd surf. There is nothing worse than being stabbed in the head by someone's heel.


19. Talk to the people around you. Don't be shy.

Get to know the people around you before the show or between bands. You meet some pretty cool people this way and it's definitely worth engaging in small talk with them, even if it's to help make the time go by faster.


20. Always show up and listen to the opening bands.

I get it, you're here for the headliner, but don't dismiss the opening bands too soon. They're probably pretty similar in musical style to the band or artist you're there for, so the chances that you'll enjoy them are pretty high. I've been introduced to some of my favorite bands through opening acts, and there's even been shows where the opening band was better than the actual headliner. Opening bands deserve your time and attention just as much as the headliner, and just because they don't have an entire tour named after them, doesn't mean their music isn't good.


21. Take as many videos and pictures as you want, who cares what anyone has to say.

If you want to take a few videos or pictures to commemorate the night, by all means, go crazy(ish). Don't apologize for your absurdly long Snapchat story or the million pictures of your favorite band member either. Maybe not record the entire concert, but a few vids here and there are perfectly OK.


22. When a band tells you to jump, move, clap, or sing-along, YOU DO IT.

Shout out your favorite lyrics. Make the floor move beneath your feet. Dance like no is watching. Just go crazy.


23. Do not be embarrassed to let loose.

No one, absolutely no one, is judging your terrible singing or wacky dance moves so don't be afraid to go a little crazy. You're going to have a much better time this way than if you stand there, stiff as a bored, conscious of scrutiny and judgment. Trust me, everyone's focus is on the band so know is going to notice if you break out into the running man mid-song.



After the show:

24. Go crazy at the merch table.

Hopefully you brought the rest of your life savings with you, because you're going to need it. Whether you want to represent your favorite band or show them a little love, the merch table is something you should not avoid, unless you know, you're totally broke.


25. Go home, rehydrate, reminisce over the wonderful night you had and get ready for your next show.

If you're like me, you never give post-concert-depression the time to fester and develop because just as one show has ended, you're preparing for a next.

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Concerts Are My Guilty Pleasure And I Am Not Sorry About It

Sometimes my bank account doesn't like me because of it.

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There is something about the flash of the lights, the sound of the band coming out, the other excited people around you, and the intense feeling of seeing someone you like live. Concerts are such a unique medium that bring together the artists and the fans in a pretty close way. I have been going to concerts for most of my life and I have to say I don't know what it is, but there is something so special about concerts in my life.

No matter how many things that I do in life, I do try to be careful with my money and I try not to overspend on things, but concerts are definitely one of my main guilty pleasures. I am also definitely that person who likes to try and get the VIP/ Meet and Greet Experience when I go to shows. The mindset basically comes from if I am already going to spend the money to go to this show and it is for someone that I really like then why would I not want to be able to meet them. The other part of it too is it's someone that you really love and if the opportunity arises for you to meet someone, you never know when or if you will get to meet them again so why are you going to pass up that opportunity.

As I have grown up, I have become that person who goes to most shows/concerts alone and I am completely okay with it because it is so much fun. Yes, it is awesome to go to concerts with friends and enjoy that time, but I also like to go to shows my way and most of the ones I want to go to most people wouldn't want to go to. But none of that matter because concerts are something that I love and if it is someone that I want to see, I am going to go.

Everybody has their own guilty pleasure and mine is concerts. No matter what yours is whether is concerts or hiking or photography, people's opinion about what you like to do should not and does not matter. You should do what you like and it doesn't matter what people think about it. It's your hobby or guilty pleasure and what people think shouldn't matter. I used to worry about what people would think about me going to concerts by myself, but then I realized how stupid it was. First off, I am probably never going to see these people again. Secondly, if it is something I want to do, I am just going to do it and go to the show, no matter what people think about it.

Concerts/ shows are something that are so interesting to go to because not only are you seeing the people that you love and enjoy, you also get a glimpse into who they are. There may be a set designer for these shows, but the show still comes from the person who you are going to see and that's when you get to see a part of who they are. Creating a show is just that creating something that you love and you want the people who follow you to love. That's why I truly love concerts because they are this small moment of a few hours where the artist and the fans truly get to come together for a special moment.

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