Theater Sometimes Deserves More Recognition Than Sports

11 Reasons Theater Scholarships Should Be More Popular Than Sports Scholarships

It's time we all recognized theater as something that requires just as much effort and skill as sports.

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Before you get angry at this headline, I'm going to preface this with a fact about myself: I love sports. I myself played volleyball and tennis all throughout junior high and high school, and I am forever grateful for the lessons I learned while participating in those sports, and I will always remember the joy they brought me.

But there is another thing that has been a part of my life longer than sports, and that's theater.

I've been in love with the stage since I was five. I was constantly in shows as a young student, and I loved every second of it. And while I may not do theater anymore, I have never stopped loving it and recognizing how much work goes into every show. Theater deserves way more credit and recognition than it is currently given to it, and I believe that starts with theater scholarships. In order to raise up the next generation of artists, they need to be given the proper tools in order to succeed. Here are thirteen reasons why I believe theater scholarships should be more popular than sports scholarships.

1. Theater is more competitive than sports, maybe even more.

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Sports try-outs are stressful, but I guarantee you there's nothing more stressful than competing against almost a hundred other people for a single role. At least with sports, there are multiple spots for people to try out for.

2. Athletes are not chosen for teams based on their appearance.

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Sure, height is a part of the criteria for getting chosen for a team, but the main component of getting on a sports team is ability. With theater, you have to be talented enough to have the role and look the part, as well. I can't tell you how many times I've been rejected from roles because I have red hair.

3. The people who work behind the scenes are just as important as the actors themselves.

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Sports teams have managers, but they tend to be more out in the open. In theater, there are stage managers, props masters, costume designers, lighting crews, and set designers. Without them, there would be no show. All their hard work should definitely be recognized.

4. Actors are just as committed to theater as athletes are to sports.

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Actors have to follow a vigorous rehearsal and show schedule, as well as staying on top of their assignments, jobs, and spending time with their friends and family. Sometimes rehearsals go until midnight. This is very much like a practice schedule for athletes.

5. Theater requires actors to have many skills, not just one.

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Athletes need to have all the basic athletic skills, but they usually just learn skills that are specific to their position. Actors have to be able to sing, dance, and act if they want to receive the roles they want.

6. Actors devote themselves to theater for years.

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Actors don't just develop their talent overnight! It takes years and years of practice in order to become the best they can be. This means constantly attending all kinds of lessons and rehearsals in order to become one of the best of the best.

7. Memorizing lines, lyrics, cues, etc. is not easy.

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Actors have to remember their lines, choreography, and cues all within a split second. This comes from hours of rehearsal and complete and total dedication to their role.

8. Theater helps people to develop a sense of drive.

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If any actor wants to succeed in theater, they need to give each role their all, whether they're the lead or in the ensemble. Just like any athlete who wants a top spot on their team needs to put all the effort they can into it, actors need to put all the effort they can into becoming the best they can be.

9. Theatrical productions are a great way to give back to the young community.

So many kids look up to actors and actresses, and their stories of pursuing their dreams help kids to realize they can achieve those dreams too. Without actors and actresses to give back to the community, so many kids would be without great role models in the art world.

10. Theater is a great way to escape.

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When actors perform in a show (and the audience comes to see a show), they find themselves being transported to a brand new place they've never been to before. They can find themselves in turn-of-the-century New York, Ancient Egypt, or even Oz. Sports still leave people in reality, but theater helps people forget reality for a while.

11. Theater brings so many people joy.

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It's nearly impossible not to smile when you either watch or are a part of a show. Sports definitely make people (especially myself) happy, but theater has a special kind of joy that's all its own. And that definitely deserves some recognition.

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The Types of Musical Theatre

It's about more than just "Hamilton."
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With the spike in interest after the opening of "Hamilton," I thought I would take the time to explain the beautiful world that is —

But what is musical theatre? Well, the Google definition is "a genre of drama in which singing and dancing play an essential part" but there is so much more to it than that. Musicals have so many different types, and so many aspects other than just what is seen onstage. Let's look at the different types of musicals: Book musical, Revue Musical, and Rock/Pop Musicals.

1. Book Musicals

A "book musical" is one with traditional musical with a story that drives the music and characters. This category includes: "CATS," "RENT," "Annie," "The Book of Mormon," and "Oklahoma"!

2. Revue Musicals

"Revue"s are a collection of songs, with a common element. This category has no definite shows dedicated to them, but they are still a part of the musical theatre genre. This can include a musical revue of composers of musicals, or a well-known actress (see: GIF of Barbra Streisand).

3. Concept Musical

A "concept" musical is where the metaphor or theme is equally or more important than the musical itself. It may comment on a social injustices. There may be dissociated plot line, or unacquainted characters. Category includes: "The Last Five Years," "Allegro," "Follies," and "Love Life."


4. Jukebox Musical

A collection of songs from a group or artist is called a "jukebox musical". These musicals may not have a storyline, but are created to showcase a performance. Category is: Mamma Mia! (The music of ABBA), Ring of Fire (Johnny Cash), Rock of Ages (Glam rock of the 80s), and Come Fly Away (Frank Sinatra)

5. Rock/Pop Musical

The use of rock or pop music (or Rock/Pop Opera) to further the story, usually with little to no dialogue. This category includes such amazing works as "Grease," "The Little Shop of Horrors," "Godspell," "The Phantom of the Opera," and "Next to Normal."


As you can see the world that is musical theatre is much larger than the beauty of "Hamilton," I hope this gave you a little bit of insight to the magical world that is musical theatre!

Cover Image Credit: hamiltonbroadway.com

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I Went To My First Broadway Show And It Was Tony-Worthy

To be clear, this was my first Broadway show on Broadway, and I loved almost every minute of it.

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Let me just make the clarification now that this wasn't my first Broadway show I've seen. I've seen several at the Arizona Broadway Theater and also recently saw Wicked at ASU Gammage. However, this was my first ever Broadway show that I actually saw on Broadway. I was excited, to say the least. I knew it was at one of the smaller theaters on Broadway, but I was just as excited as I would have been for any of the other performances. It really all about the experience, and overall mine was great.

Deciding which show I was going to see was no small feat. I had a mini list that included Aladdin, Waitress, and Chicago. Deep down I really wanted to see Hamilton, but as a broke college student who recently started to make payments on their new car, Hamilton tickets were not even an idea. It really came down to what I could afford and what I would regret the most not seeing. So I chose Chicago. The ticket that I bought was relatively inexpensive since I sat in the far back of the theatre and would still have enough money left over for a commemorative t-shirt.

I was originally planning on going with one of my cousins that lives in New York, but her plans changed and I ended up going by myself. Some of you reading this are probably thinking, "aww that's so sad, going to the theatre by herself." Let me just squash that thought by saying how much I prefer going to things like that alone. I go to the movies alone more times than I go with someone else. That could be a whole other story on why I prefer my alone time, but in short: I'm an introvert. So I was fine seeing the musical by myself. My dad and I walked around Time Square before showtime. He dropped me off, and then we both went our separate ways for a few hours.

Like I said earlier, this was one of the smaller theaters on Broadway so it wasn't hard to find my seat. I bought my shirt before I went to my seat because I assumed there was going to be a line after the show. There wasn't, but I was still happy I got it earlier because then I could just leave after the show. My seat was literally four rows away from where the back wall of the theater was. Which was fine. I have great eyesight and I could see all of the stage clearly. That was until the large group of teenage girls sat directly in front of me and completely blocked my view of center stage.

During the first half of the musical, I was swaying side to side to get a view of the stage. I didn't want to yell at the girl and tell her to sit properly so the people behind her could see. Mainly because her mom was sitting next to her, and I didn't want that drama in the middle of the play. So during intermission, I moved seats. To my right, there were several empty rows of seats with no one for a few rows ahead of them so I thought "might as well." I made the decision to move because someone came and sat behind me about two songs into the music and started to complain that she couldn't see as well. So I took the liberty for both of us to have an experience and moved out of the way. The rest of the time was marvelous. I was able to see clearly. I sang along without having an older lady next to me judging my ability. It was fantastic.

The only thing that I wish would have happened, but I guess that only happens in lesser productions is when the audience gets to meet the cast and get an autograph. Of course, I didn't have a pen or sharpie with me so it was honestly for the best, but that would have been the cherry on top. Hopefully the next time I am in New York I have enough money to see another Broadway show. Maybe if I save up it could be Hamilton.

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