Texas A&M Calls "Here" For Late President George H.W. Bush

Texas A&M Calls "Here" For Late President George H.W. Bush

There's a spirit.

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As students like myself heard the news of President George H.W. Bush's death, we fell silent. Though we were not shocked by the news, we were halted by the reality finally hitting us.

TAMU had a surprising kinship with George H.W. and Barbara Bush. Neither of the two attended the school I call home. In fact, George was primed to be aligned with stereotypical East Coast exclusivity, growing up in Connecticut and enrolling at Yale.

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How did he grow to love College Station, arguably the opposite of his privileged northeastern origin?

How did he bond with the ideals of TAMU so much that he decided to hold his presidential library and his resting place here? (Personally, I can vouch for the inspirational potential of this presidential library.)

How was he able persuade all the living former presidents to travel to Aggieland in the sweltering heat of summer for a charity event? (I went to this event. It was awesome.)

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Despite seemingly different roots, Texas A&M and H.W. had a lot in common. In his essence, H.W. Bush was a devoted Navy man and public servant. At its core, the university's culture of respect and tradition finds its genesis in an earnest reverence of service for others – in the military or otherwise. It comes down to a mutual pride in something bigger than yourself; we have a kindred hope in humanity to improve with enough humble work.

This is the attitude with which H.W. Bush led the country in his term as Commander in Chief. Although many young people don't recall the highlights of his single term presidency, he excelled in foreign policy and used his qualifications to problem solve locally.

My favorite aspect of his politics remains his bipartisanship, a concept foreign to modern mindsets. He had the rare desire to reach across labels and unify the government. He inspired Democrats and Republicans alike towards policy and change, so much so that he received the 2010 Medal of Freedom from President Barack Obama. He made domestic mistakes in power. My university makes many mistakes, (trust me). This article isn't supposed to nostalgically gloss over reality in favor of a fantasy that never actually happened.

The reason the late President had a soft spot for my school is that TAMU and H.W. Bush both strived for similar ideals, always falling short, but always remaining steadfast in the hope to manifest to again the principles and the purposes upon which we act every single day.

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As President George H.W. Bush is laid to rest on December 6, 2018, I will lean into the shared ideals of Texas A&M; and the man who believed in us.

As an Aggie, it is my duty to pay my respects to a man who strove to respect human dignity. With pomp and circumstance throughout my town, his funeral will be a military procedure fit for a war hero. A&M; honors 41 because he lived to honor humanity, just as we should exert our efforts.

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To The Nursing Major During The Hardest Week Of The Year

I know that no grade can possibly prove what kind of nurse you will be. I know that no assignment will showcase your compassion. I know that no amount of bad days will ever take away the empathy inside of you that makes you an exceptional nurse.

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To the Nursing Major During Finals Week,

I know you're tired, I know you're stressed, and I know you feel like you can't go on. I know that no part of this seems fair, and I know you are by far the biggest critic of yourself. I know that you've thought about giving up. I know that you feel alone. I know that you wonder why in the world you chose one of the hardest college majors, especially on the days it leaves you feeling empty and broken.

But, I also know that you love nursing school. I know your eyes light up when you're with patients, and I know your heart races when you think of graduation. I know that you love the people that you're in school with, like truly, we're-all-in-this-together, family type of love. I know that you look at the older nurses with admiration, just hoping and praying that you will remain that calm and composed one day. I know that every time someone asks what your college major is that you beam with pride as you tell them it's nursing, and I know that your heart skips a beat knowing that you are making a difference.

I know that no grade can possibly prove what kind of nurse you will be. I know that no assignment will showcase your compassion. I know that a failed class doesn't mean you aren't meant to do this. I know that a 'C' on a test that you studied so. dang. hard. for does not mean that you are not intelligent. I know that no amount of bad days will ever take away the empathy inside of you that makes you an exceptional nurse.

I know that nursing school isn't fair. I know you wish it was easier. I know that some days you can't remember why it's worth it. I know you want to go out and have fun. I know that staying up until 1:00 A.M. doing paperwork, only to have to be up and at clinicals before the sun rises is not fair. I know that studying this much only to be failing the class is hard. I know you wish your friends and family understood. I know that this is difficult.

Nursing school isn't glamorous, with the white lab coat and stethoscope. Nursing school is crying, randomly and a lot. Nursing school is exhaustion. Nursing school is drinking so much coffee that you lose track. Nursing school is being so stressed that you can't eat. Nursing school is four cumulative finals jam-packed into one week that is enough to make you go insane.

But, nursing school is worth it. I know that when these assignments are turned in and finals are over, that you will find the motivation to keep going. I know that one good day of making a difference in a patient's life is worth a hundred bad days of nursing school.

Keep hanging in there, nursing majors. It'll all be worth it— this I know, for sure.

So, if you have a nursing major in your life, hug them and tell them that you're proud of them. Nursing school is tough, nursing school is scary, and nursing school is overwhelming; but a simple 'thank-you' from someone we love is all we need to keep going.

Sincerely,

A third-year nursing student who knows

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2020 Democrats Need To Stick Together If They Don't Want A Repeat Of 2016

Democrats have to be willing to swallow their pride if they want the executive branch to turn blue.

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With a sufficient amount of democratic hopefuls, one of the largest problems in the party is actually choosing one. In the 2016 election, Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton were two household names that circled about. However, even after it became statistically improbably for Sanders to win the Democratic primary, he did not back down. He continued to campaign, which led to divisions in the party and might have been the reason to why the Democrats lost the election. Obviously, we have to learn from the past with the upcoming 2020 election.

Parties do better when they stick together.

When there is a division within the party, the votes get divided ultimately giving the win to the competing party. In the 2016 election, Democrats were strongly divided to a point that they were willing to vote for the Republican candidate rather than the other Democratic candidate (which did happen). Some Sanders supporters were unwilling to vote for Clinton just because it was her. They ended up voting for Trump since he wasn't Hillary. We know how that all worked out.

Democrats have to stick together and not become a hindrance to each other.

Although the candidate you were rooting for didn't win the primaries, they still share more ideals than the opposing party does. Elections are becoming more candidate-centric than party-centric which is quite concerning. Candidates have personal interests in mind and could change them on a whim. Parties have an established party platform that does change but only changes every four years.

Democrats don't want to relive what happened in the 2016 elections again.

With the high number of candidates running for the Democratic ballot, the fear of 2016 occurring again is high. Many of the candidates are extremely qualified and have dedicated voters that might put the candidate before the party. Democrats have to be willing to swallow their pride if they want the executive branch to turn blue.

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