One Year Has Passed, Where Is The Conversation On Gun Control Today?

One Year Has Passed, Where Is The Conversation On Gun Control Today?

A year ago a movement for gun control was sparked, where is that movement today?

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One year ago, 17 students and faculty of Stoneman Douglas High School were killed by a gunman. One man, who was nineteen years old, used a semi-automatic weapon and shot seventeen innocent people. His actions on February 14, 2018, sparked a movement that is determined to ensure that this tragic event does not occur again.

When the Parkland shooting happened, people around the country stood by these students in a fight to establish a stronger control on guns and those who could attain them. Students from high schools around the country also organized a national school walkout day as a symbol to those lives that were lost on valentines of 2018 and to show the government that they need to figure out a solution to this problem before it happens again.

Today, there is still a conversation on gun reform and control but it is less so on our government's agenda. People no longer speak of its importance and currency. The topic of gun control only will arise so strongly again if another major incident happens.

We need to stop this cycle and start taking action before it is too late.

Valentine's Day a year ago sparked a movement that created the "March For Our Lives," which had thousands of high school students and others from around the country gathering in Washington to march towards the White House in protest. It showed students coming together to protest to our government that their lives are more important than guns.

Many people disregarded this conversation of gun control because they believed these students were advocating for the government to take away guns from our society. This movement wanted to ban semi-automatic weapons and create better regulations on attaining guns and not allow just anyone the ability to receive a license to own and carry. The man who killed seventeen students and faculty at Stoneman Douglas High School on February 14, 2018, attained his semi-automatic weapon legally. He was mentally unstable and was still able to acquire a weapon.

This is the kind of change this movement wanted and still wants.

While this topic is no longer on the government's agenda, it still is a topic of importance. People need to understand that kids should not be afraid to go to school. More and more kids in our generation understand an active shooter drill rather than math or science. If you are one of the critics of this movement, just look at your own kids or think about your future kids - how would you feel if they were at Stoneman Douglas High School a year ago? Would you change your mind?

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7 Of The Most Influential Women In History Who Left Their Stamp On The World

6. Daisy Bates

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These are the women who made put the foundation to make our present and future possible. Even today, they still continue to inspire other young men and women. In honor of international women's history month which lasts from March 1st through the 31st, here are seven of the most influential women in history.

1. Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks is a well known African American female who refused to give up her seat on a segregated bus in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955. As a result of her actions, she was arrested which led to a nationwide campaign boycotting city buses in Montgomery.

Her brave actions played a very important role during the civil rights movement that eventually led to the end of bus segregation. Rosa Parks was given the nicknames "The First Lady Of Civil Rights" and "The Mother Of Freedom Movement".

2. Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman was a former slave and abolitionist who escaped from her plantation to lead other slaves to freedom using the Underground Railroad. The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses that led to the northern states. She dedicated her whole entire life to helping others slaves escape who wanted freedom too. Harriet Tubman also led a secret life as a former spy during the war helping the Union Army.

3. Madame C.J Walker

Madame C.J. Walker whose real name was Sarah Breedlove, an African American, who became a self-made millionaire and entrepreneur. In fact, she was considered the wealthiest African American businesswoman in 1919.

She created her own wealth by developing and selling her hair care products. Madame C.J. Walker stumbled upon her wealth when she tried to find a product that would help with her scalp disorder which made her lose the majority of hair.

This is when she began to experiment with home remedies and store bought hair treatments which inspired her to help others with their hair loss after she saw significant improvement in her hair. She also was a very generous person who helped her community by giving to those less fortunate.

4. Coretta Scott King

Coretta Scott King was an American activist and writer alongside her husband, the world famous, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, who fought for civil rights through peaceful protest. She supported nonviolence and women's rights movements.

After her husband's assassination, Mrs. King assembled and established an organization called "The King Center" in memory of her husband who believed in non-violent social change. She also led the petition to have her husband's birthday become a federal holiday which was eventually successful.

5. Susan B. Anthony

Susan B. Anthony, a Caucasian female, was a suffragist and civil rights activist. She campaigned against slavery and fought for women to be given the right to vote.

Her role definitely played a vital part in providing for the preparations for laws in the future for women rights. She worked with Elizabeth Cady Stanton to create the America Equal Rights Association (AERA) in 1866.

6. Daisy Bates

Daisy Bates was an African American activist and in 1952, she became the president of the NAACP in Arkansas. As a mentor who played a key role in helping to integrate the school system in Arkansas, she wanted to end segregation and helped do that with the introduction of the Little Rock Nine.

The Little Rock Nine was nine African American students who were enrolled in Little Rock Centeral High School, but the governor of Arkansas refused their admittance. In 1954, the Supreme Court ruled segregation in schools were unconstitutional; however, African American students were still being denied in all white high schools.

In 1957, history was made when Daisy Bates helped nine African American students known as the Little Rock Nine to become the first African Amercians to attend an all white high school.

7. Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells was a former slave in Mississippi, African American journalist, and a leader in the civil rights movement in its earlier years. Ida was born in 1862 to parents James and Elizabeth Wells.

In 1892, she began an anti lynching campaign after three African American men were abducted by a mob and then subsqequently murdered. She was a founding member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People also known as NAACP.

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I Absolutely LOVE The Abortion Bill Oklahoma Has Passed

"Men controlling women"? Get over yourself.

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"A pregnant woman seeking to abort her pregnancy shall be required to provide, in writing, the identity of the father of the fetus to the physician who is to perform or induce the abortion." The bill does include exceptions for cases of rape, incest, and when the mother's life is in danger or cases where the father of the fetus has died (and of course, there has to be proof of his death).

A woman HAS TO PROVIDE CONSENT OF THE FATHER in order to abort her pregnancy and I absolutely love this. People in my hometown and state-wide are obviously upset about this because a decent number of them are "pro-choice." They're claiming that this is just another way for "men to control women" and God forbid that gets in the way of their feminist, pro-choice agenda (and I'll address this unfathomable bullshit in a minute).

If you didn't notice already, I'm pro-life. I 100% agree with the bill, even the exceptions. I may be a pro-life Republican, but I'm also a decent human being. I'm sure pro-choice Democrats are either laughing or disgusted thus far, but let me tell you something.

There are other answers compared to killing something that you, or any other woman helped to create. One specifically is adoption. Before you make the cliche argument "Why would I place a child in such a terrible system when I could spare them the agony of a potentially terrible life?" (OR ANYTHING ALONG THOSE LINES), let me shed light on this.

Think of all the couples that desperately want children but have zero ability to have their own. Think about the families that would do anything to raise a child. While you, or any woman, is/are pregnant, there are plenty of adoption agencies that you can visit. You can look through hundreds-of-thousands of files, searching for an amazing family that you like. From there, you can sit through interviews and meet these families that are so. eager. to have a baby. If anything, think of how saddened and desperate Chandler and Monica were when they found out they couldn't have a baby. Instead of ripping away and literally killing a couple's chance of having a baby, give them yours.

A 9-10 month commitment isn't that big of a deal when you think in terms of granting happiness to someone for a LIFETIME. And considering that it's a felony homicide in Oklahoma now.

When you get an abortion, outside of the exceptions listed above, you're selfish. You're only thinking about yourself and the fact that you don't want to be a mom (and perhaps not financially stable--but we shall revisit the adoption topic). Well guess what? Someone is. Give them that chance. And if you're thinking I'm a hypocrite and wouldn't follow through with adopting a baby like I'm preaching right now, you're wrong. I would 100% adopt.

As for "men controlling women," get over yourself. Feminists rant about gender equality all the time and guess what? Think of how many women kept their babies even though their boyfriends, baby daddies, and maybe even fiances and husbands didn't want one. This is the same thing, but a gender reverse. I can think of many guys that wanted to be dads, but their girlfriends decided otherwise with no remorse for their feelings. If the father wants to keep the baby and be a dad, he deserves to fight for it.

It takes two to make a baby. The fathers of these unborn rays of sunshine deserve rights and, in Oklahoma, they just got it. You ladies want gender equality? You just got it. Quit the double standards. Quit your bitching.

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