Brandy Melville's One-Size-Only Thing Is Something We Need To Talk About

Dear Brandy Melville, I Love You But This Is The Reason Other People Don't

Brandy, we've got to talk...

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I have been shopping at Brandy Melville for as long as I can remember. Okay, I actually remember buying my first shirt from there in my freshman year of high school. The point is, I've been giving them business quite consistently for the past six years of my life. I would say that the majority of my wardrobe is from Brandy Melville, and at least one part of my outfit every day is a staple item from them. However, my enthusiasm for their products allow me to turn a blind eye to one of the biggest issues surrounding their clothes: they only come in one size.

Shopping at Brandy Melville has usually never been an issue for me. I'm usually a small in other clothing brands, and Brandy's "one size" is generally closest to a size small/extra small anyway. However, there have been quite a few times when the jeans or shorts did not fit me. Now I knew what it was like for all of the people who are not size small, which happens to be most people. It's 2019. By now, you would think that a clothing company as widely known as this one would know to make their sizing more inclusive. I'm also surprised there hasn't been more discussion about this, shaming the company for their "one-size" choice.

Brandy Melville is an international company, and as a Brandy enthusiast, I have gone out of my way to visit their store in several European cities, including Florence, Rome, Barcelona, and Amsterdam. I have noticed that in some European chains, a range of sizes does exist, which makes me question why it is just the United States that continues the one-size concept. Especially with the recent movements for body-positivity, self-love promotion, and a lot of other companies expanding their size ranges, I fail to understand why the company has not followed suit. Not only would their business spike most likely, but the company's reputation would probably benefit greatly.

Perhaps I am a little bit biased, but I think Brandy Melville's simplistic and easy-to-match style is one that everyone should consider investing in, at least a few pieces. But the fact that only individuals who fit a typical size extra small/small can wear their clothes just excludes so many, which I personally don't think is fair. So a note to Brandy Melville: I love your clothes, and I'm sure everyone else would if you just let more people wear them. Size smalls aren't the only size.

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Your Guide To Dressing For The Most Confusing Temperatures

I’ve finally figured out the right wardrobes for 40-to-65 degree-weather…I think.
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I’ve been living up north for nearly three years now, and I absolutely love it, but one of the main struggles I’ve had is that I just have absolutely no idea what to wear half the time I am going outside. Sure, it’s easy when it’s in the 30s and below, or in the 70s and up, but I’m talking about those in-between temperatures that have regularly confused me to no end. After countless guessing and checking (and taking photos of my outfits that I caption with the temperature and my thoughts on how comfortable I am), I might have finally figured out exactly what to wear in weather ranging from 40 to 65 degrees. In a nutshell, here are my conclusions:

1. 40 to 45 degrees and sunny


For this weather, I wear some kind of coat that isn’t your heavy-duty winter one. Underneath, I sport a lightweight long-sleeve top, and leggings or jeans, but steer clear of ultra-ripped ones.

2. 40 to 45 degrees and cloudy

It’s time to bring out the look that is one step away from your winter garb. Grab your second-warmest coat and pair it with a thick long-sleeve top or lightweight sweater, or wear a super thin sweater underneath your warmest jacket. Leggings are definitely the move, and it wouldn’t be the worst thing in the world for you to have a beanie on standby.

3. 46 to 52 degrees and sunny

To stay cozy in this brisk temperature, slip on a normal-to-thick sweater and a warm jacket that you’ll want to zip up. If there’s no wind, you might be able to get away with ripped jeans, but of course there’s always leggings, too.

4. 46 to 52 degrees and cloudy

Wear the jacket that comes just before you’d pull out any kind of coat from your closet. I would air on the side of caution by styling it with a thick sweater, but if you don’t get cold easily, you could probably just wear that jacket with a lightweight top and maybe a vest. I wouldn’t say this weather is ripped-jeans-friendly, yet, but hey, it’s your call.

5. 53 to 59 degrees and sunny

This is where you can have the most fun! You can wear a sweater and a vest, a warm long-sleeve and a poncho, any kind of top and a somewhat-warm jacket – it’s all about trading off the weights of your layers to create a snug balance. Opt for any kind of bottoms that will cover your legs, whether it be pants, ripped or non-ripped jeans, a skirt and tights, etc., and you will be good to go.

6. 53 to 59 degrees and cloudy

To me, this is pretty similar to the 53 to 59 degrees on a sunny day. Basically, stick to its sunny-weather counterpart’s directions, but tip the balance of your layers to a slightly warmer side.

7. 60 to 65 and sunny

No matter what you wear in this weather, it’s hard to go wrong – you’re pretty much guaranteed to be at least somewhat comfortable. Rock a t-shirt, long-sleeve or a flannel, but have an extra layer handy just in case. As for bottoms, anything is fair game.

8. 60 to 65 degrees and cloudy

I’d say same as everything in the suggestions above, except you’re definitely going to want to have that extra layer – doesn’t have to be thick, just something to keep you comfortable without the sun’s warmth.

Oh and pro tip: if it’s windy, increase the warmth of your layers everywhere.

Cover Image Credit: blog.stitchfix.com

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The Faces And Future Of Sustainability In The Fashion Industry

The science is unanimous: climate change is real, and it's only getting worse.

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While the conversation surrounding climate change is often plagued by alarmist statements and perilous precautions, there is a practical and hopeful narrative that can be found in its solutions. As much finger pointing as society likes to do, the causes of climate change would take all ten fingers and more to point out the root issues. One of the culprits that hit closest to home is the fashion industry. As an aspiring design major, I've been directly faced with the reality of the industry's harmful habits. Quick turnaround, high demand, and evolving expectations make the production environment very complex to navigate at the least.

Although the fashion industry caters to just about 7 billion people, it doesn't excuse companies, brands, and labels from producing at the expense of our world. Despite the long-held attitude of indifference towards its side-effects; as of late, climate science has left no choice for the industry but to change course. The science has made it evident that we've run out of time to be apathetic; action must be taken, and it must be taken now.

Enter the side of the climate change conversation that's introduced a variety of initiatives to promote change. Whether it's recycling ocean plastic into tennis shoes like Adidas, using up waste fabrics from larger companies like Zero Waste Daniel, or Kate Hudson's Happy x Nature, which has been developed from sustainable materials, the fashion industry is venturing into a greener future.

Adidas first announced its plans to create a sneaker from recycled ocean plastic in 2015, "Parley for the Oceans." Since the release of their first tennis shoe four years ago, they sold 5 million pairs in 2018, and they're aiming to turn out 11 million pairs in 2019. Ocean plastic is a huge threat to marine life, and it's not enough to just stockpile it in a landfill. Adidas's product development team cleverly provided a solution for at least some of that plastic. What's great about the shoe, too, is that it retails right around the price point of most of their other styles at around $130.

Alongside Adidas's recycling, Zero Waste Daniel, a designer based in Brooklyn, NY, has made it his mission to use excess fabric scraps from the industry in his own designs. Using a number of techniques, Daniel combines these remnants into new fabrics, fashions them into appliqués or mosaics, or creates whole garments. Alarmingly enough, it's reported that about 21 billion pounds of waste textiles are going to the dump from the US alone. By gathering up the leftovers from other companies, his products are helping to prevent the wastes from continuing to end up in landfills.

Although not made from reused fabrics, Kate Hudson's latest fashion venture, Happy x Nature, is produced solely from sustainable materials. The fibers of the fabrics are made from recyclables like plastic bottles, and the packaging is stated to be biodegradable. Not only is the new line eco-friendly, but it's also relatively affordable with prices ranging from $45 to $150. Let me tell you, Hudson really knocked it out of the park with this concept. I've browsed through the pieces and have fallen in love with the majority. The pieces are seriously adorable and so trendy, but the biggest seller is that I can feel good about purchasing them.

While recycling ocean plastic and sourcing waste fabrics are important strides in the right direction, consumers play an enormous role in this issue. For any of these initiatives to work, there must be consumer demand at the other end of the product. Companies and brands need to see potential consumers for greener products in order to place such products on the market. As such, as consumers, we should reevaluate our own shopping habits in regards to the apparel industry. We must take accountability for how much we purchase, how often we purchase, and how we manage the clothes after we've bought them. Our demands as customers must also align with the push for greener production and shopping patterns.

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