To The Jerks Who Order Delivery In A Snow Storm, I'm Calling You Out

To The Jerks Who Order Delivery In A Snow Storm, I'm Calling You Out

If you wouldn't drive in it, you shouldn't make a teenager with a 1996 Honda Accord do it instead.

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We live in an amazing world where if we want delivery at 2 a.m., we can get it. That being said, if there's a pretty terrible snowstorm out you can probably bet that your local Domino's is open and delivering. But just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

I work in a franchise pizza place and often when there's snow on the road, our orders come in, and a majority of them are deliveries. And just as often, people often ask if ordering when there are inches of snow outside makes them a jerk. Quite frankly, yes, it does. If you're sitting in your home looking outside thinking it's too dangerous for you to drive, then order delivery because you can't just cook for yourself for one day, yes, you are kind of a jerk.

Let me explain why. As we get piled up with orders, most of the time the roads aren't cleared and customers don't even do the slight courtesy of shoveling a quick walkway to their door. So not only are drivers risking their lives with the elements and other drivers, but they're also slipping on their way up to your door. And of course, because of careful driving, the delivery time may take longer than usual and that often leaves to little tips.

So 20-year-old Johnny in his 1996 Honda Accord pushes against horrible weather and risks his life so you can get your food, and receive barely a tip? This is what you don't do!

However, people will always order delivery when there's terrible weather, and you should be more grateful that drivers make it to your door instead of the company's ability to deliver to you at this moment. Because companies will always be there to deliver in your time of need, the least you can do is be a little less of a jerk by doing these simple things:

Tip well. Like, really well. Delivery fees often don't go to the drivers and they're making anywhere from 2 to 5 dollars while driving. Your delivery person will greatly appreciate it after they just risked their lives!

Allow extra time. When there's snow, there are orders. Chances are you aren't the only delivery at this time and the drivers are doing their best to get your food to you in a timely manner while still staying safe. Don't call after 20 minutes complaining about where the food is. Everyone is just trying their best!

Don't leave negative reviews. Seriously, if there's an actual problem call your restaurant and explain so they can at least resolve it with a credit for the next time you order. Give them some slack, don't make them suffer because the wait was too long in terrible weather or they forgot your ketchup packages.

Or maybe just reconsider ordering delivery? Working in the service industry is hard, snow days make it so much harder and really push employees to their limit. People show up to work because they need the money so someone will always be there to deliver for you, but consider making their day slightly easier by cooking your dinner at home instead.

Just because a delivery driver can make it, doesn't mean he/she should even go for it. Consider skipping the delivery during a terrible storm, or at least, don't be a total jerk about it because we truly do appreciate it when we at least get proper gratitude during this hard time.

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The Unspoken Dangers of 'Mukbang' Culture

Ever wondered why you can't stop clicking on these addictive, self-made eating shows?

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Unless you've been living under a rock for the past five years, you've probably heard of the internet trend commonly referred to as a mukbang, or "eating show." These self-produced video clips typically involve one hungry individual, their filming device, and an obscene amount of delicious foods.

Though these broadcasts originated all the way from South Korea (hence the foreign vocabulary), the growing popularity of eating videos has taken the internet by storm. Nowadays as you scroll through YouTube, you'll find an outrageous amount of uploads with titles like "10,000 CALORIE PASTA MUKBANG," "EATING EVERYTHING ON THE MCDONALD'S MENU," or "THE ULTIMATE CHOCOLATE CHALLENGE."

Popular 'mukbangers' such as Peggie Neo, Megan McCullom, and Steven Sushi have made a sizable profit off of their viral eating shows, some collecting tens of thousands of dollars in revenue.

So, what's the big deal you say? You order a large quantity of food, indulge in said food, film yourself completing this menial task, and upload to the internet for money and fame. On the outside, this may seem like a luxurious lifestyle, but behind the camera lens sits an individual battling their own demons and influencing the world of social media to partake in their harmful behaviors.

Mukbanger Livia Adams ("Alwayshungry" on YouTube) has opened up about her unhealthy relationship with food in the past, praising herself for fasting several hours in order to justify her over-indulgence on camera.

Similarly, internet sensation Trisha Paytas claims to diet and starve herself for weeks just to be able to satisfy her subscribers with epic mukbangs, which are essentially binges.

In all actuality, these social media celebrities are negatively impacting (and possibly triggering) vulnerable viewers.

Many fans only see the highlight reel of YouTubers shoveling bowls of cereal or boxes of doughnuts into their mouths, yet remain completely unaware of what truly goes on behind-the-scenes. Messages saying:

"I'm on a diet... watching this is giving me some sort of satisfaction, like as tho I ate, you know?"
"I watch these videos because I know I physically can't afford to eat like this because I gain weight too easily."
"When having an eating disorder, watching Trisha's mukbangs is sorta comforting in a way omg"

flood the comments sections of Paytas' videos. Quite obviously, fans young and old are heavily influenced by this content and continue to support these creators to fulfill a self-destructive need.

Additionally, famous mukbang accounts never seem to include the painful after-effects of their ginormous feasts in videos. Fitness model Stephanie Buttermore flaunts her slim physique just days after consuming over 10,000 calories for a challenge, giving the impression that her previous overindulgence had no repercussions on her health whatsoever. Because Buttermore is a trained, athletic young woman, she was able to quickly bounce back after a series of workouts and low-calorie meals.

On the contrary, if a sedentary woman of about the same age were to attempt this challenge, she would most likely feel sluggish, irritable, bloated, stomach discomfort, and even vomitous post challenge. Eating regularly like this could lead to bigger issues such as heart disease, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, and certain types of cancer. Unfortunately, because topics like these aren't glamorous and attractive to subscribers, mukbangers often edit them out.

Now don't get me wrong. Though not everyone who uploads a mukbang to the internet has an eating disorder or an evil agenda, they have to realize the kind of audience they're appealing to. This generation is more susceptible than ever to emulate the actions and words of their favorite celebrities. Young boys and girls look up to successful adults, and influencers should be remembered for the change they inspired, not the disease they encouraged.

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Dear Mother Nature, We're Cold And Ready For Spring!

Where is spring and all the fun, warm weather activities it has to offer?

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It begins to set at the same time of year, around the end of February, the overall frustration with the post-January, pre-spring winter blues. Mornings are dark and cold, nighttime starts at 4 p.m., and the motivation to do anything is just nonexistent. Which brings up the question of where is spring and all the fun, warm weather activities it has to offer?

Come December, the holiday season brings out the love of winter the strongest, everyone is merry, spending time with loved ones, ice skating, drinking hot cocoa, cuddling up to watch movies, and just overall taking advantage of the cold weather. However, the weeks following New Years is when the mood starts to change and happiness begins to plummet people seem to fall into a post-holiday funk and the cold weather sure as hell doesn't help. It seems like the month of January is centuries long, I don't know if it's because it has 31 days or if the cold weather somehow stretches out the month, but making it through January is an accomplishment in itself. January is basically Winter in its own, so when it ends, people are more than ready to shake off the snow and get into some warmer days.

Then, February second rolls around and people are eagerly scoping the news to watch a groundhog predict our fate as they anxiously hope for him to not see his shadow and an early spring arrives at last. At least that is what happened this year. It seems that year after year the groundhog sees his shadow, gets scared, sprints back into his hole and we are left with six more weeks of winter, but this year told a different tale. The groundhog saw his shadow and ultimately it was predicted for an early spring. This prediction alone has sparked warm weather anticipation epically. People went straight to online shopping for bathing suits and shorts, rather than sweaters and boots.

Now, it may just be Virginia's wishy-washy weather but I somehow believe mother nature is playing tricks on us. One day will be 65, the next will snow, the next will rain and be 42, and the next will be 75. I even think the early spring prediction made Valentine's day for singles a little more bearable, because the 15th, the day after Valentine's day, was sunny and in the 60s. So mother nature, when is the inconsistency going to stop?

I think I speak for most when I say that we are ready for some spring weather. Ready for no jackets, shorts, getting in your car without having to clear it off first, longer days, flowers in bloom, and baby animals running around. Not to mention actually enjoying walking places in the warm spring breeze, rather than speed walking bundled up in 5 layers with a wind-chill that chaps up your face. It's something about warm weather that just makes people nicer, and overall puts us in better moods. Even on my most stressful day, if I walk outside and its anywhere above 60 and sunny, I automatically feel at ease.

I am not asking to fast forward to summer I am just ready for some mood enhancing, sunny, spring weather to make its way on over and terminate the winter blues.

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