10 Tips To Rock Any Interview

10 Tips To Rock Any Interview

From a self-proclaimed Interview expert.

Seeking jobs, admissions and any other important position usually require Interviews. During those nerve wracking 10-30 minutes, you are expected to show the interviewer(s) just how perfect you are for the position.

Whether over the phone, video calls or in person, these tips will help get you through your interview seamlessly and show that you are very qualified for the position you want. As an expert on taking interviews and getting the position, I’m going to share what worked for me and hope it works for you!

1. Dress semi-formal

For most positions that you’ll be going in for, the interviewer doesn’t actually care about how you’re dressed. Gone are the days of stereotyped hiring. If you’re going to visible, dress in a that fine line between casual and formal.

Too formal and you end up looking pretentious and over-dressed. Too casual and you look like you’re not taking it seriously.

2. Try to be interesting

Emphasis on try. You don’t have to be pretend to be someone you’re not though. Just answer any questions with as much enthusiasm as you can muster.

This is especially necessary for phone interviews. Be bright and bubbly!

3. Be slightly humorous

Laughter is always helpful for an interview. If you can make your interviewer laugh or smile at your humor, then that is an IN. It shows that you are easy to be around and also good company.

4. Make eye contact

Not the creepy stalker eye contact thing. For 75% of the time, make sure you’re looking at their faces.

If there’s more than one person, divide your attention between them. Make sure you don’t look away too quickly.

5. Be Prepared to Answer Questions

Nothing screams unprofessional like stumbling over your words and taking too much time to think. Before you get there, have the interview staple questions down.

Eg: “Why are you the most qualified for this position?”, “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”, “What qualities do you possess that you feel are most useful?”, etc.

6. Prepare 3-5 Questions to Ask Them

At the end of the interview, you’ll always be asked if you have any questions for them. Make sure you have those questions prepared beforehand.

Even if you really don’t have any questions, think of good questions that you already know the answer to. It makes you look more interested in the position.

7. Avoid Sentence Fillers

“Like”, “Literally” and “Umm” are unacceptable. As much as you want to let them escape, hold back from saying them. They make you sound as if you don’t know what to say.

Replace “Like” with words of similar meanings: for example, such as, as if, for instance, etc. If you are tempted to say “Umm” better keep shut and say nothing at all.

Never say Literally. Ever.

8. Use a Measured Tone of Voice

Many people tend to talk too loud, fast, low or slow when they’re nervous or under pressure. Try your best to keep track of how you sound when you speak.

Take your time to speak and listen to yourself so you can control your voice when the time comes.

9. Avoid Nervous Tics

Scratching your neck or scalp, rubbing your face, twirling your hair and any other nervous tics should be left at outside the interview room. It’s easier said than done but try to be extremely conscious of your body.

When you find yourself reaching for the hair, calmly stop. You don’t want to seem insecure during an interview.

10. Be Yourself

Don’t try to be someone you are not. The interviewers want to know YOU. Tell your own experiences and try to be comfortable in your own skin. Your stories and experiences are interesting, valid and wanted.

Now go forth and rock your next interview!
Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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Success Is Great, But Failure Is Better

Fail and fail often.

Don’t let success get to your head, but don’t let failure get to your heart. Know that things don’t always work out as planned, and that is OK!

For many millennials, it’s easiest to just give up when something doesn’t go your way. But take heart. Success is great, but failure is better. The reality is, you’re going to fail... a lot.

Failure does not mean your idea was not good or that your dream isn’t valid.

Failure means you have more to learn.

Failure is GOOD.

It shows you that you did something wrong and that you need to take a redirection. It’s an opportunity to come back stronger with a better attack plan. It’s a second chance.

Having failed many times in my life, there’s one thing for sure: failing sucks. It sucks being disappointed. It sucks not succeeding on the first try. However, you can learn to become a good failure.

Failing is inevitable, which is why it is important to learn from our mistakes. You’ll learn more from a single failure than a lifetime of success. Here’s what you can do when you mess up: accept what you can’t change, keep an open mind, maintain a positive attitude, and know that nothing will be perfect.

When I was a sophomore in high school, I was on an engineering team at my school. I was extremely confident in our abilities as a team, so when we didn’t advance to the world finals, I was devastated. The next year, however, my team placed second at the national competition, and we advanced to the world finals. If I had allowed that initial failure to consume me, I wouldn’t have been successful the next year.

It was not easy to advance to the world finals, but because I took my previous failure as a learning opportunity, my team succeeded. I knew I couldn’t change the past, so I didn’t focus on it. I kept an open mind about the competition and did not allow my bitterness to harden me, thus maintaining a positive attitude. My team wasn’t perfect, and I knew that. But I knew if we worked hard, we would succeed. We did.

Every failure is feedback on how to improve. Nothing works unless you do, and nothing works exactly the way you want it to. Failure is life’s greatest teacher; it’s nothing to be scared of. If we are so focused on not failing, we will never succeed.

So fail, and fail often.

Cover Image Credit: Pixabay

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7 Things English Majors Go Through

Yes, I'm an English major. No, I'm not throwing away my education.

I love being an English major.

And no -- I'm not lying.

While I do advocate for womxn in tech and the rise of STEM majors, my heart belongs to the humanities and more importantly: English Literature.

Here are some of the things as an English Major that I have experienced:

1. So... Do you wanna be a teacher?

As an English Major, my sole purpose of getting my degree is not to just become a teacher. I also want to be a writer. Get it right. I also want to be a teacher, though, so...

2. Writer's Block

Writer's block = hell unleashed. My brain is my most valued. My heart, too, but my brain is what helps me actually write my essays and poems. When my brain isn't working, I'm not working, and with those two not working -- I'm not getting anything done.

3. Having Friends Ask You To Edit Their Papers

My mood 24/7 when people ask me to edit their papers. I'm working on my own, leave me alone. Seriously though, I know I'm an English major, but there's a reason why office hours were created -- but if you REALLY need my editing/revising, pay up.

4. Reading "Whatever" Literature

There are some great works that I love reading (Frankenstein, Great Expectations, Dr. J & Mr. H, etc). But if I'm forced to read another book that EVERYONE has "read" and ends with the classic patriarchal ending -- I'd rather not. Give me some more Mary Shelley, please.

5. Reading AMAZING Literature

OK BUT WHEN THE CLASS READS SOMETHING LIKE MRS. DALLOWAY -- I AM SO HAPPY (I love you, V.W). But, honestly, I love most literature (especially classics). It's only with very few works that I'm upset with reading. (50 Shades of Grey? Blegh.)

6. Getting Trash-Talked About Your Major

OkAy, SuSaN, I get that you're happy with being in the business school, but frankly I don't care, so don't worry about me or my major. We, English majors, get trash-talked about our majors. Back in the day, our major was considered noble and great -- and now it's considered as "throwing away our education".

7. Knowing that We Chose the Right Major

In my experience in college so far, I've met very few -- actually no one who has changed their major from English Lit/CRTWRT. (Disclaimer: I'm sure there are some?) But those of us who stayed with this major know that we chose the right path for ourselves. While our friends in STEM, Business, etc. are "having fun" with their path, we get to read our favorite works, write, and appreciate the arts. So... who's the real winner? ;)

Cover Image Credit: Study Breaks

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