Your Birthday: Then vs. Now

Your Birthday: Then vs. Now

The childhood drink was apple juice. Now, maybe hard apple cider?
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fAs you grow older, birthdays become less and less exciting. It's still cool to feel like you have a day dedicated to yourself, but when adult life and responsibilities get in the way, celebration may be the last thing on your mind. Each year you may realize that...maybe you're not actually excited for your "special day" like you would've been in elementary school. As I grow older I find that a few things about birthdays change dramatically as we age. Here are some things you might've forgotten about entirely.

1. A Cake

I can't tell you the last time I had an actual birthday cake. Now, this may sound sad (it sounded sad to me as I typed it), but it's not like I couldn't get one. I just never really thought to. Personally, I'm not a cake fan myself, but even still. I've never felt sad about not having icing to lick off a numbered candle on my birthday. Unless you're having a big party, a cake just seems extraneous, doesn't it?

2. The Party Itself

I think my last birthday party was when I was thirteen, no joke. Past then I would usually hang out with some friends, grab some pizza, and watch a movie or something. Nothing special. But as I've grown even more and transitioned into adulthood, it'd be a miracle if I even leave my house on my birthday. I've got schoolwork to do, cleaning to get done, not to mention all the time my usual procrastinating will take. Who has time to think about hanging out with friends? I've got a shift at work and a paper to write. I can age next year.

4. Presents

Happy birthday to me. From: me. The best part about birthdays as you get older is people find it more and more acceptable to just give you money for your special day, which means you get the best gift of all: online shopping spree. Anyone can tell you my addiction to online shopping, but it is unparalleled come my birthday. I've got $250 dollars to spend? That's $200 worth of stuff plus shipping. That plus the blessing that I don't have to fake liking gifts anymore makes it the best time of the year. I get whatever I want, and the only person that might be questioning it is my banker when I suddenly drop $300 in one weekend.

5. Friends

When I was three, I remember inviting the entirety of my daycare class to my birthday party at McDonald's. When I was thirteen, about five of my friends came over and we giggled over Twilight (yes, I was one of those kids). Now, I might invite one person over to eat pizza and complain about life. As you grow older, people get busier, and can't just have their moms drop them off at your house for a party. Schedules constantly conflict in adulthood, but in my opinion, it's a blessing in disguise. Parties can be a hassle to plan, and with only one or two other people, it's much cheaper and easier to celebrate aging. One large pizza: $7.99. Eight large pizzas: my wallet crying.

6. Excitement


As a kid, I thought my birthday was the absolute best day of the year. I couldn't wait to get presents, be showered with affection, and see all my friends at my party. Not to mention getting a year older. But as I grow older the years go by quicker and quicker; everyone tells me I'll blink and I'll be 40. Growing another year just isn't exciting anymore. It's just another year closer to more responsibilities: a year closer to having to begin my career, a year closer to being off my parents' insurance, a year closer to my car breaking down and me having to buy a new one. Aging has just become more and more stressful; is it time to retire yet?

7. The Myth of the Day Off


Birthdays used to be so special that celebration would consume the entirety of my day's activities. It was wake up, have an awesome breakfast, get calls from my family, get ready for my party, have my party, then enjoy a super-long sleepover with a select group of my friends. Now it's like, 'Yes, happy birthday to me, but I have a paper due in two hours that I've barely written a paragraph for. Then I have to go to work.' Life doesn't stop for your special day anymore. That means you can't stop either.


Don't worry, birthdays don't suddenly get sucky as we grow older. We just have to celebrate them in a different way. It's more fun to celebrate as an adult, but those celebrations come with more responsibilities and consequences. So we just have to party safely, and enjoy this weird stage of adultish-youth while we can. As I'm told later on into real adulthood birthdays do just sort of get sucky. Guess we will all find out. Happy birthday!


Cover Image Credit: http://healthquest-fitness.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/birthdayparty.jpg

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move-in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 a.m. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest.

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old dorm room is now filled with two freshmen trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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14 Things You Relate To If You Grew Up WithOUT Any Cousins

*GASP* "What, you really don't have any cousins?"

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It always shocks every person who hears me state that I do not have any cousins. For some reason, this is just hard for people to really believe when it's actually not something impossible. I think we are all just so used to large families that it sounds weird when people say that they have no cousins. Yet, it is definitely a potential reality, and actually impossible if each of your parents is the only child to your grandparents.

Here are 14 things that you can relate to if you grew up without any cousins.

1. Nobody believes you when you say that you don't have any cousins

I'm serious, for the tenth time.

2. Your grandparents spoil you

With no other grandchildren to worry about, it's pretty easy to do.

3. You don't understand when people say that cousins are your first best friends

My best friend was my first best friend.

4. You and your siblings are always the youngest people at family events

This was simultaneosuly a good thing and a bad thing.

5. You get all of the attention at holidays

Since you're the youngest one around, then distant relatives are always doting over you.

6. Everything you do is deemed awesome by your extended family because there is nobody to compete with

It's much easier to be praised when you aren't being compared to someone similar to your age.

7. You don't know how to hold babies

You're never around them so why would you?

8. Family photos are pretty easy to coordinate

The less people, the easier.

9. Other family members spoil you just because 

Afterall, you are the only kid around...

10. The family will make comments regarding the potential for you to have a cousin as a justification for why they aren't doing something for you

When you hear, "I can't buy you too much because someday your aunt is going to have kids and I will have to do the same for them" you cringe and just had to know that all of the attention wouldn't last forever.

11. Birthdays are always a big deal

A perk of not having very many to remember.

12. If your parents' siblings own pets, then you refer to the animal as your cousin

Cat cousins, dog cousins, lizard cousins, and fish cousins can be pretty cool, actually.

13. Sometimes you dream of marrying into a big family

This is to ensure that your kids do grow up with cousins.

14. You appreciate the closeness of your tight-knit fam

Maybe the only thing you would miss if you had a big family is the opportunity to develop such close bonds with the few relatives that you do have.

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