Yellowstone National Park To Kill 1,000 Bison

Yellowstone National Park To Kill 1,000 Bison

The park has proposed a mass-killing of around 1,000 bison to prevent the migration of the animals into Montana.
46
views

Recently Yellowstone National Park has proposed a mass killing of wild bison this winter to reduce the animal's natural migration into Montana. Since 2000, the bison population of Yellowstone has been controlled through selective slaughtering per a federal agreement that states their numbers should remain around 3,000. According to the Associated Press, the buffalo population reached nearly 5,000 animals this summer, much higher than comfortable targets.

Historically, bison can spread a disease called brucellosis to livestock, and it is mainly for this reason that the state of Montana has an agreement with the federal government that allows the killing of the animals to prevent this spread. Brucellosis can cause pregnant animals, particularly cows, to miscarry their young. Additionally, Montana ranchers fear that a large influx of bison would overgraze lands they need for feeding their livestock.




If the proposal is approved, hunters would be able to hunt several hundred of the buffalo for sport. The rest would be slaughtered for the meat industry and the few left will supposedly be captured for scientific research purposes. The killing would place an emphasis on calves and females in order to curb population growth from increasing further. However, it is not yet set in stone. Yellowstone park officials are still waiting to meet with local Native American tribes and federal officials to come to a concrete agreement.

That being said, these methods of population control have been used for 15 years, and the federal agreement allowing them has been controversial from its conception. Yellowstone National Park is no stranger to public opposition to these population control methods. In fact, on the FAQ of their website they outline why this culling, or removal of buffalo, occurs each year and how. Essentially, the culling of bison is required by the agreement with Montana, and not done because of environmental factors within Yellowstone itself.

Many people suggest that the animals simply be allowed to be hunted for sport as a means for controlling the population. The Park Service explains that hunting is illegal within the park, and that hunting buffalo in Montana only reduces the population by around 300 each year, and, "a panel of expert scientists reviewing bison and brucellosis issues in 2013 concluded that culling or removals of bison, along with hunting, would be necessary to limit the size of the bison population." All hope for the animals is not lost, however, as weather is a crucial factor in their migration pattern: fewer bison will leave Yellowstone for Montana if snowfall is lighter, and the fewer that leave, the fewer that will be killed.

Cover Image Credit: Yellow Stone Park

Popular Right Now

5 Perks Of Having A Long-Distance Best Friend

The best kind of long-distance relationship.
271023
views

Sometimes, people get annoyed when girls refer to multiple people as their "best friend," but they don't understand. We have different types of best friends. There's the going out together best friend, the see each other everyday best friend and the constant, low maintenance best friend.

While I'm lucky enough to have two out of the three at the same school as me, my "low maintenance" best friend goes to college six hours from Baton Rouge.

This type of friend is special because no matter how long you go without talking or seeing each other, you're always insanely close. Even though I miss her daily, having a long-distance best friend has its perks. Here are just a few of them...

1. Getting to see each other is a special event.

Sometimes when you see someone all the time, you take that person and their friendship for granted. When you don't get to see one of your favorite people very often, the times when you're together are truly appreciated.

2. You always have someone to give unbiased advice.

This person knows you best, but they probably don't know the people you're telling them about, so they can give you better advice than anyone else.

3. You always have someone to text and FaceTime.

While there may be hundreds of miles between you, they're also just a phone call away. You know they'll always be there for you even when they can't physically be there.

4. You can plan fun trips to visit each other.

When you can visit each other, you get to meet the people you've heard so much about and experience all the places they love. You get to have your own college experience and, sometimes, theirs, too.

5. You know they will always be a part of your life.

If you can survive going to school in different states, you've both proven that your friendship will last forever. You both care enough to make time for the other in the midst of exams, social events, and homework.

The long-distance best friend is a forever friend. While I wish I could see mine more, I wouldn't trade her for anything.

Cover Image Credit: Just For Laughs-Chicago

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

Celebrating The Grand Canyon's 100th Birthday

Cheers to 100 years of climbing, camping, and boat trips down the Colorado River.

21
views

100 years ago last week, the Grand Canyon was established as the 17th National Park. Covering nearly 2,000 square miles of incredible desert wilderness, the Grand Canyon is consistently among the most visited parks and is recognized globally as a true wonder of the world.

While the canyon layers were formed long before dinosaurs roamed, fossils of ancient marine animals are often uncovered – some dating back 1.2 billion years.

The Great Unconformity refers to a gap in the rock record between Cambrian times (~550 m.y. ago) and the pre-Cambrian (anything earlier). An unconformity is a surface in the rock record, in the stratigraphic column, representing a time from which no rocks are preserved — a geological mystery of epic proportions.

Meaning 250 million-year-old sediment layers can be found right on top of layers holding those very same billion-year-old fossils. What happened to the millions of years in between? Nobody knows yet.

Of the many unconformities observed in geological strata, the term Great Unconformity is frequently applied to either the unconformity observed by James Hutton in 1787 at Siccar Point in Scotland or that observed by John Wesley Powell in the Grand Canyon in 1869.

These are both exceptional examples of instances where the contacts between sedimentary strata and either sedimentary or crystalline strata of greatly different ages, origins, and structure represent periods of geologic time sufficiently long to raise great mountains and then erode them away.

Carved over hundreds of millions of years by the Colorado River and measuring 277 miles (446 km) long, up to 18 miles (29 km) wide, the Grand Canyon is a major natural phenomenon, but it is also a place of deep historical mysteries and oddities as well.

It's days like today when I feel the most grateful to live where I do and to be able to appreciate so much of the great outdoors. To be able to climb and hike rocks that have existed for hundreds of millions of years.

Related Content

Facebook Comments