Why Networking Is The Most Important Part of College

Why Networking Is The Most Important Part of College

Not about what you know, but who you know

A strange concept college is – you pay tens of thousands of dollars to learn. And ultimately nothing could come of it if you do not put yourself in a good position.


There are a variety of percentages that I can throw at you describing the number of students that exit college with debt. But the point is, many collegiate students exit school with a degree, and need a way to pay back their debt. This means that after four years of working long into the early morning, preparing presentations and speeches, studying, averaging under five hours of sleep if that, and being broke all along the way, you have a good chance of entering the real world already in the hole.

So that ever-important goal of landing your dream career is not only ideal but essential. I personally did not know this until I was researching it myself, but basically, less than 20 percent of graduates have career type jobs after leaving school (less than 20 percent sounds at least a little better than the real number).

That's a scary figure. One out of every five people. So that means if you get in a full car of people to go out on a Friday night after class, only the driver is getting his/her career job when you all walk the stage and receive that elusive diploma.

The Washington Post gives some suggestions as to why this may be so; one example being that universities do not equip students with the right tools in the career services office. While I agree that sometimes schools may not be preparing students to directly enter the job field they intend to, it is hard to not only set thousands of students up with careers but have enough time to guide each student individually.

In my opinion, that is why networking is the most important part of the college journey. You can get a 4.0, dump $200,000 into your school (or loan line) and graduate with nothing. (Yes, if you have a perfect GPA and are shelling out top dollar at a top of the line school you are likely to be recruited, but you get the point).

As a more personal example, I'll use myself. Freshman year I did really well academically. I had that aspect all-together and was still able to have fun and enjoy my first year at Coastal Carolina. But I had no involvement. I wasn't a part of any club or organization, I wasn't scouting out internships, and I wasn't looking for opportunities. There were people with the same level of social involvement I had, but had lesser grades. But they were involved in organizations, fraternities, and sororities, or career-oriented assemblies.

If you're a part of a hiring team, who do you choose. The person you have known for years, first hand seen the level of involvement that they present, how dedicated their work ethic is, and feel like you can trust? Or do you hire the applicant who has a great grade point average and no involvement attached to their resume, no hands on experience to show?

Seems like no contest.


Grades are important, I'll be the first to attest to that. Spending long nights in the library, making hundreds of useless flashcards, and getting assignments done before the due date are part of my routine. But I've realized a lot of the time in this world it's not necessarily about what you know. The real world is often like a fraternity party. So when you show up at the world's front door, you better have a good answer to the question, "Who do you know here?"

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Five Ways to Deal with a Loud Roommate

There is still hope...for a good night's sleep

There is nothing wrong with wanting to bring friends over to your dorm or apartment, but sometimes it is not the right time. During the day, it is completely fine to blast music, but when midnight comes around, it becomes obnoxious. Getting woken up on a school night is not fun, so here are some ways to handle having either one or two loud roommates.


1. Play Loud Music(With/Without Headphones)

If their talking extremely loud or having a loud karaoke session with their friends, it’s only fair to blast your mixtape or your favorite song. Really good ear buds or headphones will do the trick too.


2. Bring Over Your Friends

They want to have a party, then make it a party! You can ignore your roommate while having fun with your own squad. If they get annoyed when their being just as loud with their friends, it means they are hypocrites and it is not your problem.


3. Buy a Big Fan

This works better in an apartment where everyone gets their own room. I know from personal experience that once that loud fan comes on, it blocks out most of the noise surrounding you. I don't recommend using it during the winter unless you get really annoyed.

4. Leave


This is my least favorite solution since it’s not fair, but it isn't a bad idea when you’re on the verge of cursing someone out. Try finding a friend to hang out with. If not, drive or walk around for a while. Just find some peace and quiet, especially if you have to study.


5. Talk to Them

Even if you don’t think they will listen, it doesn't hurt to try. You could address them while their being loud to remind them that you're not deaf. Or you could sit them down and make some sort of an arrangement where you both feel comfortable. If you talk to them and they chose to still be obnoxious, then you might want to consider the other solutions above. Or better yet, get a new roommate.





Cover Image Credit: psIloveyou

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Find Some Time To Do Nothing

Why the suburbs raised me well and I didn’t realize it.

I was born and raised in a small village in Upstate New York called Pittsford. Population: 27,219. I mostly hated growing up there. I always thought I was destined for a city- constant people and things to do. Probably because I was and always have been bad at boredom. Boredom, in many ways, is my worst enemy. As a kid, I never knew what to do with it. I would drive my mom insane pacing around the house trying to get her to take me to do something or play a game with me or just let me ramble about how bored I was to her.

She would incessantly ignore me to the point where I would freak out and get so tired I would have to take a nap. Then she would say - “there you go, that’s all you had to do was just be still.” I never understood that- “just be still.” It made no sense to an anxious, vigorous mind like mine. “Just being still” was just simply not an option.

After almost 10 years of this routine - boredom, anxious pacing and freaking out - I had had enough. I was in 9th grade and I couldn’t take it anymore. I had one last major ‘freak out’ over winter break that year. It lasted nearly 10 hours. I had plainly lost my mind. One shattered mirror, a smashed iPhone and many slammed doors later, I was nearing the end of some of the most painful, dreadful 10 hours of my life.

I found myself lying on a bench in the hallway of my mothers' house, squeezing my head and telling it to shut up. My mom sat with me silently for many hours, repeating the words “just be still.” I got it- I finally got it. That was what was wrong. My head could not be still and boredom itched that reality a little bit too harshly.

With lack of ability to find constant entertainment in my small little town and quaint, quiet neighborhood, I was forced to face the demons in my head that boredom would expose. I realized, through many anxiety attacks and silent days and nights alone with my thoughts, I realized that there had to be an alternative reality- that life couldn’t possibly consist of such incessant anxious nagging thoughts because otherwise, the human race wouldn’t exist.

As a result, I came to understand more of the depths of my being and the crevices of my mind that often acted like black holes. I began to reach inwards for long-term contentment instead of reaching outwards for provisional bliss. Boredom thus has forced and allowed me to come to know myself on a deeper level.

I have been able to understand the demons of the mind and know them on the most personal level possible. I have also learned how to combat these demons before they are even born as a result of knowing them so deeply. So, despite the bad reputation that boredom gets, I attest that it is one of the most crucial parts of personal and spiritual growth. Contrasting with the words of Tyler the Creator- I proclaim that we, the human race, “find some time to do ‘nothing’.”

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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