Why Networking Is The Most Important Part of College

Why Networking Is The Most Important Part of College

Not about what you know, but who you know
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A strange concept college is – you pay tens of thousands of dollars to learn. And ultimately nothing could come of it if you do not put yourself in a good position.


There are a variety of percentages that I can throw at you describing the number of students that exit college with debt. But the point is, many collegiate students exit school with a degree, and need a way to pay back their debt. This means that after four years of working long into the early morning, preparing presentations and speeches, studying, averaging under five hours of sleep if that, and being broke all along the way, you have a good chance of entering the real world already in the hole.

So that ever-important goal of landing your dream career is not only ideal but essential. I personally did not know this until I was researching it myself, but basically, less than 20 percent of graduates have career type jobs after leaving school (less than 20 percent sounds at least a little better than the real number).

That's a scary figure. One out of every five people. So that means if you get in a full car of people to go out on a Friday night after class, only the driver is getting his/her career job when you all walk the stage and receive that elusive diploma.

The Washington Post gives some suggestions as to why this may be so; one example being that universities do not equip students with the right tools in the career services office. While I agree that sometimes schools may not be preparing students to directly enter the job field they intend to, it is hard to not only set thousands of students up with careers but have enough time to guide each student individually.

In my opinion, that is why networking is the most important part of the college journey. You can get a 4.0, dump $200,000 into your school (or loan line) and graduate with nothing. (Yes, if you have a perfect GPA and are shelling out top dollar at a top of the line school you are likely to be recruited, but you get the point).

As a more personal example, I'll use myself. Freshman year I did really well academically. I had that aspect all-together and was still able to have fun and enjoy my first year at Coastal Carolina. But I had no involvement. I wasn't a part of any club or organization, I wasn't scouting out internships, and I wasn't looking for opportunities. There were people with the same level of social involvement I had, but had lesser grades. But they were involved in organizations, fraternities, and sororities, or career-oriented assemblies.

If you're a part of a hiring team, who do you choose. The person you have known for years, first hand seen the level of involvement that they present, how dedicated their work ethic is, and feel like you can trust? Or do you hire the applicant who has a great grade point average and no involvement attached to their resume, no hands on experience to show?

Seems like no contest.


Grades are important, I'll be the first to attest to that. Spending long nights in the library, making hundreds of useless flashcards, and getting assignments done before the due date are part of my routine. But I've realized a lot of the time in this world it's not necessarily about what you know. The real world is often like a fraternity party. So when you show up at the world's front door, you better have a good answer to the question, "Who do you know here?"

Cover Image Credit: effectivesoftwaredesign.com

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It's Time To Thank Your First Roommate

Not the horror story kind of roommate, but the one that was truly awesome.
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Nostalgic feelings have recently caused me to reflect back on my freshman year of college. No other year of my life has been filled with more ups and downs, and highs and lows, than freshman year. Throughout all of the madness, one factor remained constant: my roommate. It is time to thank her for everything. These are only a few of the many reasons to do so, and this goes for roommates everywhere.

You have been through all the college "firsts" together.

If you think about it, your roommate was there through all of your first college experiences. The first day of orientation, wishing you luck on the first days of classes, the first night out, etc. That is something that can never be changed. You will always look back and think, "I remember my first day of college with ____."

You were even each other's first real college friend.

Months before move in day, you were already planning out what freshman year would be like. Whether you previously knew each other, met on Facebook, or arranged to meet in person before making any decisions, you made your first real college friend during that process.

SEE ALSO: 18 Signs You're A Little Too Comfortable With Your Best Friends

The transition from high school to college is not easy, but somehow you made it out on the other side.

It is no secret that transitioning from high school to college is difficult. No matter how excited you were to get away from home, reality hit at some point. Although some people are better at adjusting than others, at the times when you were not, your roommate was there to listen. You helped each other out, and made it through together.

Late night talks were never more real.

Remember the first week when we stayed up talking until 2:00 A.M. every night? Late night talks will never be more real than they were freshman year. There was so much to plan for, figure out, and hope for. Your roommate talked, listened, laughed, and cried right there with you until one of you stopped responding because sleep took over.

You saw each other at your absolute lowest,

It was difficult being away from home. It hurt watching relationships end and losing touch with your hometown friends. It was stressful trying to get in the swing of college level classes. Despite all of the above, your roommate saw, listened, and strengthened you.

...but you also saw each other during your highest highs.

After seeing each other during the lows, seeing each other during the highs was such a great feeling. Getting involved on campus, making new friends, and succeeding in classes are only a few of the many ways you have watched each other grow.

There was so much time to bond before the stresses of college would later take over.

Freshman year was not "easy," but looking back on it, it was more manageable than you thought at the time. College only gets busier the more the years go on, which means less free time. Freshman year you went to lunch, dinner, the gym, class, events, and everything else possible together. You had the chance to be each other's go-to before it got tough.

No matter what, you always bounced back to being inseparable.

Phases of not talking or seeing each other because of business and stress would come and go. Even though you physically grew apart, you did not grow apart as friends. When one of you was in a funk, as soon as it was over, you bounced right back. You and your freshman roommate were inseparable.

The "remember that one time, freshman year..." stories never end.

Looking back on freshman year together is one of my favorite times. There are so many stories you have made, which at the time seemed so small, that bring the biggest laughs today. You will always have those stories to share together.

SEE ALSO: 15 Things You Say To Your Roommates Before Going Out

The unspoken rule that no matter how far apart you grow, you are always there for each other.

It is sad to look back and realize everything that has changed since your freshman year days. You started college with a clean slate, and all you really had was each other. Even though you went separate ways, there is an unspoken rule that you are still always there for each other.

Your old doom room is now filled with two freshman trying to make it through their first year. They will never know all the memories that you made in that room, and how it used to be your home. You can only hope that they will have the relationship you had together to reflect on in the years to come.


Cover Image Credit: Katie Ward

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6 Characteristics A Good Baking Mentor Should Possess

Make sure that your teacher is an open-minded person who is ready to listen to your grievances and queries
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Baking is an art but teaching it requires a lot of patience and positivity. You might be a skilled baker but that doesn’t mean that you can be a great teacher as well. This is why it is important that you choose a good mentor for yourself when you are learning how to bake else you would end up bad baking results.

How do you select the right teacher for yourself? What characteristics or qualifications should you look out for?

Don’t worry, we have listed down a few characteristics that you should look out for when choosing the perfect teacher for yourself.

1. Great organizational skills

One of the most important qualities of a good baking teacher is how to lead the students and carry out their baking class. A good teacher will have the whole baking class outlined which will include specific timing for theory and hands-on session to train the students properly. They would also account any issues that might arise during the class and how to deal with them efficiently.

2. Patient and motivating

New bakers in training often make mistakes or are to slow to understand the instruction which is why a good teacher will need to be patient with them. If you choose a highly-qualified teacher who is impatient and always criticising then you are likely to give up the baking class and maybe never get back into it as a career too. This is why it is extremely important that you find a teacher who will be patient and motivating and will explain to you things gently without getting frustrated easily.

3. Highly-trained and qualified

Of course, a teacher needs to be properly qualified in order to teach you the subject so make sure that you choose a teacher who has the necessary baking qualifications and certifications. While you can choose a teacher without the diploma or certifications in baking and cake decoration courses, it is likely that you would get a more thorough training if you do. So, check out their educational background before you start taking classes with them.

4. Good communicator

Another important quality of a good teacher is to be able to communicate their thoughts clearly to the students, so that it's easy for them to understand. If a teacher is not able to communicate the recipe properly or isn’t able to share the baking tips with you then the complete class would turn out to be an utter waste of your time. So, make sure that you choose a teacher who has good speaking skills and is able to efficiently get their point across to the students.

5. Creative and inspiring

No one feels inspired by a boring, monotonous class with the teacher droning on or following the same class schedule every day. This holds particularly true for bakers as they need some inspiration to bake new and innovative things. If your teacher lacks the creativity and always follows the course rules then you are less likely to enjoy their class. On the other hand, if your teacher is always bringing something new to the table and motivates the students to use their own imagination then you are more likely to feel inspired to bake.

6. Ready to listen

Finally, make sure that your teacher is an open-minded person who is ready to listen to your grievances and queries. You don’t want to learn from a teacher who won’t listen to your ideas or answer your queries as this will be counter-productive to your learning. Make sure you choose a teacher who will be supportive and helpful and will always clear your doubts so that you can be properly trained.

Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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