Poetry On Odyssey: Who Am I

Poetry On Odyssey: Who Am I

Our Ancestors Live Within Us
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Who Am I?

I am Angelou's inspiration

That exceeded limitation

I am Gandhi's patience

Waiting for peace and cooperation

Yet I am X's passion

Violence only in reaction

I am Benjamin's hope

Fighting in a war that will never repay him

I am Bessie Coleman's vision

Saw what could be and wind it

I am Langston Hughes' creativity

Art filled with messages and life lessons

I am Rosa Parks' feet

Willing to stand for beliefs

I am Ray Charles' senses

Redefining magic touch

I am Ali's stamina

Fighting my way to victory

I am Huey and Angela's mindset

Ready to die for cause if necessary

And In Them I Am Born

I am History


Cover Image Credit: Pexels

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6 Things You Should Know About The Woman Who Can't Stand Modern Feminism

Yes, she wants to be heard too.

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2018 is sort of a trap for this woman. She believes in women with all of the fire inside of her, but it is hard for her to offer support when people are making fools of themselves and disguising it as feminism.

The fact of the matter is that women possess qualities that men don't and men possess qualities that women don't. That is natural. Plus, no one sees men parading the streets in penis costumes complaining that they don't get to carry their own fetus for nine months.

1. She really loves and values women.

She is incredibly proud to be a woman.

She knows the amount of power than a woman's presence alone can hold. She sees when a woman walks into a room and makes the whole place light up. She begs that you won't make her feel like a "lady hater" because she doesn't want to follow a trend that she doesn't agree with.

2. She wants equality, too

She has seen the fundamental issues in the corporate world, where women and men are not receiving equal pay.

She doesn't cheer on the businesses that don't see women and men as equivalents. But she does recognize that if she works her butt off, she can be as successful as she wants to.

3. She wears a bra.

While she knows the "I don't have to wear a bra for society" trend isn't a new one, but she doesn't quite get it. Like maybe she wants to wear a bra because it makes her feel better. Maybe she wears a bra because it is the normal things to do... And that's OK.

Maybe she wants to put wear a lacy bra and pretty makeup to feel girly on .a date night. She is confused by the women who claim to be "fighting for women," because sometimes they make her feel bad for expressing her ladyhood in a different way than them.

4. She hates creeps just as much as you do. .

Just because she isn't a feminist does not mean that she is cool with the gruesome reality that 1 in 5 women are sexually abused.

In fact, this makes her stomach turn inside out to think about. She knows and loves people who have been through such a tragedy and wants to put the terrible, creepy, sexually charged criminals behind bars just as bad as the next woman.

Remember that just because she isn't a feminist doesn't mean she thinks awful men can do whatever they want.

5. There is a reason she is ashamed of 2018's version of feminism.

She looks at women in history who have made a difference and is miserably blown away by modern feminism's performance.

Not only have women in the past won themselves the right to vote, but also the right to buy birth control and have credit cards in their names and EVEN saw marital rape become a criminal offense.

None of them dressed in vagina costumes to win anyone over though... Crazy, right?

6. She isn't going to dress in a lady parts costume to prove a point.

This leaves her speechless. It is like the women around her have absolutely lost their minds and their agendas, only lessening their own credibility.

"Mom, what are those ladies on TV dressed up as?"

"Ummm... it looks to me like they are pink taco's honey."

She loves who she is and she cherished what makes her different from the men around her. She doesn't want to compromise who she is as a woman just so she can be "equal with men."

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Your Identity Isn't Invalid If You Change Your Label Or Feel Like You Need To Come Out Again

Coming out multiple times or labeling yourself different does not invalidate who you are and don't let anyone else tell you otherwise.

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When you're younger, coming to terms with your sexuality and gender identity can be difficult. Oftentimes there aren't resources or support for younger questioning individuals and that makes it really hard to process your feelings. For me, all I had was one out friend and the internet. Although my friend was a lot of help, they are only one person and I didn't want to annoy them with my questions. So I looked to youtube, social media, tumblr, and other platforms to hear people's stories and see if I could put a name to my feelings.

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If you are thinking about coming out again or feel that your identity might be in transition. IT'S OKAY. Sexuality and gender are fluid. They are everchanging and it is perfectly normal to feel like you need to label yourself differently to stay true to yourself. It is also perfectly fine to not want to label yourself at all. That is the beauty of the LGBTQ+ community. We accept everyone. This community was founded in love and no matter who you are or how you identify, you are valid and you are supported.

Coming out multiple times can be a daunting task. But I promise, living as your authentic self is so much better than hiding. Even if it isn't safe for you to come out or you aren't ready to, know that you still matter and your identity is still legitimate. You have an entire community that is rooting for you! Coming out is hard. Doing it again doesn't make it any easier. But I've been there, and I know you're doing your best.

Support your friends and family while they are in their journey of finding who they are. Be there for them, reassure them, answer their questions, and remind them that no matter where they are in their journey, that you will love and accept them no matter what. Also be sure to change your behaviors as necessary. Have a friend who is questioning their gender? Maybe ask them if they'd like to try out different pronouns or if they want to go shopping for different clothes. Know someone who is struggling with their sexuality? Maybe introduce them to other queer friends and share resources that they might find helpful.

Figuring out who you are is scary. Questioning your gender and sexuality can sometimes make it worse. So support your friends and family, be an ally to all, and remember that there isn't one set path to being LGBTQ+. We are all on our own journey, but changing your journey doesn't make it any less real or beautiful.

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