College Living Is Comfortable But Less Than Glamorous At University Village

College Living Is Comfortable But Less Than Glamorous At University Village

12 reasons University Village is not the best place to live in Clemson.

82
views

1. Maintenance will come to your apartment with little or no notice.

2. Everything is white.

3. The people at the front desk don't know the answers to half your questions.

4. Answers range from person to person at the front desk.

5. Charge ridiculous fees. 

6. Too much advertising.

7. They will send emails to you saying you will be evicted if you don't pay your rent soon, but you paid it on time, a while ago. 

8. Your friends have to add their devices to your account in order to use your WiFi. 

9. When everyone else's pools are open in April, ours doesn't open until May. 

10. Bathrooms are tiny.

11. Not much kitchen cabinet space.

12. When you order a maintenance request, they take forever to fix whatever needs to be fixed. 

If you want to live somewhere, I would pay more to stay somewhere nicer. It'd be worth it.

Popular Right Now

Why Nursing School Is Different Than Any Other Major

Because most other majors can't kill someone accidentally by adding wrong.
37242
views

College is hard. Between studying for numerous amounts of tests and balancing eating, working out, maintaining a social life, and somehow not breaking your bank account, it’s no wonder a common conversation among students is “how many mental breakdowns did you have this week?” Every major will pose its own challenges; that’s truth. Nursing school, however, is a special kind of tough that only other nursing majors can understand.

SEE ALSO: Quit Bashing Radford University

Nurses are the backbone and unsung hero of healthcare. Their job is to advocate for the patient, collaborate care among all other healthcare team members, carry out physician orders, recognize and report patient progress (or lack thereof), run interference for the patient with any unwanted visitors, research and validate evidence based practice, all while maintaining a certain aurora of confidence for patients and their loved ones that “everything will be okay” and “I’ve got this under control”. If that sounds like a lot; that’s because it is. The majority of skills that we learn that make good nurses cannot actually be taught in theory classes. It’s the hours of actual practice and a certain knack for caring for people- all people- that makes a good nurse great. The countless, unrelenting hours that are spent on the floor in clinical humble us, we know that we’re not great yet, but we’re trying.

Our professors expect us to be humble as well. Nurses do not seek gold stars for their actions, instead the precedence that is set for us to that we “do the right thing because it is the right thing to do”. Most nursing programs grading scales are different. To us, a failing grade isn’t actually getting a 69 or lower, it’s an 80. And that makes sense; no one would want a nurse who only understand 70% of what is happening in the body. We have to understand the normal body response, what happens when things go wrong, why it happens the way it does, and how to properly intervene. We want to learn, it interests us, and we know that the long theory classes and the hard days on the floor are just to make us better. However, any triumph, anytime you do well, whatever small victory that may feel like for you, it just what is supposed to happen- it’s what is expected, and we still have much to learn.

I look back on my decision to take on nursing school, and I often find myself questioning: why? There are so many other majors out there that offer job security, or that help people, or would challenge me just as much. But, when I think of being a nurse- it’s what fulfills me. There’s something that the title holds that makes me feel complete (and that same fact is going to resonate with anyone who wants to love their job). I wouldn’t change the decision I made for anything, I love what I am learning to do and I feel that it’s part of what makes me who I am. The other students who I have met through nursing school are some of the most amazing people I have ever come into contact with, and the professors have helped me understand so much more about myself than I thought possible.

Nursing is treating and understanding the human response. Meaning that it’s not just the disease process, or the action of the medication, or the care that we provide, but that nurses treat the way in which people deal, react, feel, and cope with good news, bad news, terrible procedures, hospital stays and being completely dependent on other people. And the fact of the matter is that all people are different. There is no one magic treatment that will always work for every patient. In addition to course work, the clinical hours, the passion and drive to want to be a nurse, and the difficulty that comes with any medical profession, we have to understand each individual patient, as people and not their illness. And, in order to do that so much self discovery goes on each day to recognize where you are and how you are coping with everything coming your way.

What is taught in nursing school goes far beyond just textbook information or step by step procedures. We have to learn, and quickly, how to help and connect with people on a level which most struggle to accomplish in a lifetime. It's a different kind of instruction, and it either takes place quickly or not at all. The quality of nurse you become depends on it. Nursing school is different, not harder or better than any other school, just different.

SEE ALSO: Stop Putting Down Radford University



Cover Image Credit: stocksnap.io

Related Content

Connect with a generation
of new voices.

We are students, thinkers, influencers, and communities sharing our ideas with the world. Join our platform to create and discover content that actually matters to you.

Learn more Start Creating

The Possible Strike At Rutgers University Hinges On Barchi's Unfortunate Spending Decisions

It's time for Rutgers to fix its priorities. Our faculty is what keeps our university running. We stand with our teachers, and we expect change.

43
views

Whispers have been floating throughout the Rutgers University campus for quite some time of a teacher strike, and whether people are interested in the solidarity of faculty or the possible break from classes, there are a lot of questions being asked.

So what does this mean? And what do we know?

To understand the effect is to understand the cause. The union at Rutgers, American Association of University Professors - American Federation of Teachers (AAUP-AFT), has been fighting "the corporate university" for over a year to achieve affordable education, more diverse representation, and better quality of our education. This could call for the first faculty and grad strike in the university's 253-year history, as President Barchi's priorities have been deemed twisted to those who are affected by them.

"Our working conditions are our students' learning conditions," said Rutgers AAUP-AFT.

The union has outlined what exactly they are fighting for, including three subcategories of equity, quality higher education, and security. This includes equal pay for part-time faculty, female faculty, and faculty in Newark and Camden campuses for equity, improvement of student/faculty ratio by hiring more full-time faculty, more diverse faculty, and more teaching assistantship to improve the university's quality of education, and salary increases ahead of cost-of-living, five-year graduate funding packages, longer and more secure contracts for non-tenure track faculty, and family/research-friendly work schedules for security.

AAUP-AFT has also highlighted some unnecessary, costly expenses that Barchi has been selecting to indulge instead of faculty salaries. These expenses include athletics subsidies ($193 million), liquid unrestricted reserves ($783 million), and money spent on coaches/administrators "golden parachutes" ($11.5 million).

Union members at Rutgers Newark have demonstrated protests by picketing for three hours last Tuesday. Rutgers — New Brunswick plans to follow this display if no contracts are made or improved, affecting its approximate 38,000 students just as the spring semester draws to a close.

"It's a final warning — contract or strike," said Deepa Kumar, the president of Rutgers AAUP-AFT. "Do the right thing and give us a fair contract. Otherwise, we will have no choice but to go on strike."

I stand with AAUP-AFT Rutgers professors who are prepared to strike in order to defend affordable, quality higher education. When we organize and stand together, we win.

Bernie Sanders (@BernieSanders)

Though the university's spokespeople are claiming that negotiations are underway, a strike is still on track to happen at some point next week, leaving classrooms empty and students without work.

"Yeah, it's going to be complicated. Every syllabus is going to be screwed up," said Margaret Curran, an undergraduate student at Rutgers University – New Brunswick. "But it's something that needs to be done. We understand and we stand with our professors."

It's time for Rutgers to fix its priorities. Our faculty is what keeps our university running. We stand with our teachers, and we expect change.

For more information, you can visit www.rutgersaaup.org.

Related Content

Facebook Comments